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Probably, that difference is mostly due to the lower Winter temperature you experience in the far north of Europe, compared to the temperature for the WLTP-test. That can make a difference of 30%. Also, a different speed may play a role. The current list of reported range estimations in the Google Sheet (starting in October, so no Summer temperatures) is:

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The average of them is now 300 km. When we have had Summer 2020, the numbers will have become higher.
 

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This is a comparable overview for the pre2020 28kWh version. As you can see, it varies with temperature (and speed) from 100 to 400 km range.
 

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I think I did not copy the link correctly. It should work now.
 

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It works for me too. Make sure you use the link given in the original post, not the link in the quoted post. The quoted post still has the wrong link.

Does anyone have experience with the Ioniq ev during extreme cold, such as on days when it is - 20F / -29C? I have an 80 mile commute and a few days every few years get that cold. The car would sit outside for 8 hours while I'm at work, so will it continue to lose range while parked in extreme cold? I'm thinking an EV may not be the right option, but I hate to give up the benefits for those very rare days.
 

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It works for me too. Make sure you use the link given in the original post, not the link in the quoted post. The quoted post still has the wrong link.

Does anyone have experience with the Ioniq ev during extreme cold, such as on days when it is - 20F / -29C? I have an 80 mile commute and a few days every few years get that cold. The car would sit outside for 8 hours while I'm at work, so will it continue to lose range while parked in extreme cold? I'm thinking an EV may not be the right option, but I hate to give up the benefits for those very rare days.
I imagine the Norwegians do, and until recently they were the country with the most EV owners. Maybe Bjorn has a video on it.
 

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Not a range issue as such, but may be of interest. Having had the 12v battery go flat - apparently a common problem, I had to sit in the car while it recharged from the main battery. (Incidentally, this took 2 miles/1% off the battery status. Re-charging took an hour) I killed off the auto climate control etc, so sat in a quiet, fan-free car. Did a short journey - just a few miles - and noticed 5.2kWh performance. Reminded me to reset the auto CC. Return journey showed 3.8kWh. I was surprised at the difference.
 

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Not a range issue as such, but may be of interest. Having had the 12v battery go flat - apparently a common problem, I had to sit in the car while it recharged from the main battery. (Incidentally, this took 2 miles/1% off the battery status. Re-charging took an hour) I killed off the auto climate control etc, so sat in a quiet, fan-free car. Did a short journey - just a few miles - and noticed 5.2kWh performance. Reminded me to reset the auto CC. Return journey showed 3.8kWh. I was surprised at the difference.
You had a battery go flat and were able to charge it just by waiting for an hour? Or was this after jump starting?

Reset the auto CC? Do you mean changing to AUTO CC meant the efficiency dropped to 3.8kWh/mi from 5.2kWh/mi?
 

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You had a battery go flat and were able to charge it just by waiting for an hour? Or was this after jump starting?

Reset the auto CC? Do you mean changing to AUTO CC meant the efficiency dropped to 3.8kWh/mi from 5.2kWh/mi?
After it had been charged a bit via the AA's mobile charger. Yes, changed back to Auto, 21C, driver only from Off.
 

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In Norway, a comparative test was done of the 2020 Ioniq EV and the Model 3 Short Range. In cooperation with a towing service, both cars were driven from 100% until they stranded totally empty. After this, they were charged again (after 20 minutes delay due to the towing). Some of the outcomes were:
  • Prices in Norway: Ioniq from NOK 272 000; Model 3 from NOK 385 000
  • Battery and consumption: Ioniq 38.3 kWh battery, 37.2 kWh consumed; Model 3 54 kWh battery, 50.3 kWh consumed
  • Achieved range: Ioniq 272 km; Model 3 314 km
  • Achieved efficiency: Ioniq 13.7 kWh/100km; Model 3 16 kWh/100km
  • Energy loss during charging (percentages of total input delivered by the charger): Ioniq 9.5%, Model 3 15.9%
  • Charging power: Ioniq average 30 kW, max 45 kW; Model 3 average 81 kW, max 100 kW
The temperatures while driving were between +8 degrees C and -10 degrees C.

So, in contrast to the EPA data on efficiency, in this test, the Ioniq was the most efficient one (16% more efficient in terms of kWh/100km). So, don't consider the EPA numbers as a gold standard; maybe they can also be manipulated. Also, the loss percentage during charging was much lower for the Ioniq (40% lower). In summary, in this test, the Ioniq proves to be by far the most efficient one of the two, both from wall to driving and from battery to driving.

For range vs price also the Ioniq wins with 1 km/1000NOK versus 0.8 km/1000NOK, so for each 1000 NOK you pay, you get 22% more range with the Ioniq.

Concerning the last bullet, the provided info was not 100% clear. 1) Charging up to 80% or up to 100%? 2) There seem to be inconsistencies between the numbers in the graph and the numbers mentioned in the text. 3) How much did the battery cool down during the 20 minutes of towing?
 
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