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Does the higher capacity and smaller design, or even higher bandwidth have a material benefit in the car? I figure whatever cables one uses for the car, stay in the car. $10 at amazon for an A-to-C cable, or $9 for a C-to-C cable, with both providing an identical experience except when plugging them in, after which the car side connector never gets a second thought... am I missing something?

For me personally, I have plenty of A-to-C cables and would be annoyed if I had to buy C-to-C cables because my car lacked A ports.

Edit: something else occurred to me. For that front USB port, where someone might possibly knock the cable either moving around or reaching for something, I much prefer it is an A connector, especially a right-angle one, with its sturdier construction and wider trace width contacts.
It doesn’t have a higher benefit to you because your devices and needs don’t seem to require it.
Benefits:
“USB C is the all-one-one cable to rule them all. USB Type-C and USB 3.1 is the future of cables and ports. It's universal, fast, powerful, tiny, reversible, open, and backwards compatible. This USB-C standard uses the new USB 3.1 and supports data, power, and video all in one cable! Finally, the holy grail of ports! When you travel with your laptop, phone, and tablet, no longer will you need to bring 12 different cables with you.”

Lack of USB C in the Ioniq 5 meant I needed to buy a cigarette USB C adaptor. I exclusively buy only USB C devices to keep cables and adaptors/etc. to a minimum. (my iPhone 13 Pro Max use wireless charging mostly via MagSafe)

I just picked up the NOCO GBX 46 booster pack because of the 12V battery issue in the I5. I can fast charge it with my USB C Apple Laptop Charger in under an hour. What’s not to like about USB C?
Font Audio equipment Musical instrument accessory Tool Gadget

  • Turbo Chargeable - Boost X is equipped with USB-C technology that, combined with power delivery, gives you lightning-fast recharges. Completely recharges in just 48-minutes, or go from 0% to jump starting in just 5-minutes of charge.
  • Charge Everything - With USB-C Power Delivery, you have the power to charge almost everything. Its internal power bank provides 60-watts of power - both in and out - to effortlessly power your favorite USB-C devices, like phones, tablets, laptops, wearables, and more.
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    Output device Font Material property Technology Gadget

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What’s not to like about USB C?
Nothing wrong with USB C at all, but there is a difference between having a USB C connector and providing USB C level of service. Just because a charging port in a car is physically a USB C connector doesn't mean it will support anyone's device's elevated capabilities.

Since USB C ports have started appearing on cars, I have been under the impression that the only difference is the form factor, not the hardware behind it. This article seems to state this as well: My car has a USB C Port. Is it better? It's from 2020 though, and may be outdated. This passage sums up my (perhaps outdated) mindset:

An oval hole doesn’t mean the underlying circuitry is running the latest USB data specification, or that it has more juice on tap for charging your phone. But it might …

I suspect many reviewers are under the impression that if the physical format is there, then the hardware must be too.

Anyone have more recent info if newer cars have any different charging hardware behind USB C ports than they already have for USB A ports? It would be really interesting to know if the USB C ports in the EV 6 charge any quicker.

If the commotion is over not only having the physical form factor but also the elevated--and certainly more expensive--charging hardware, that's a different prospect for the manufacturer. How many drivers are willing to pay more or give up other features so that a probably small minority can start a one hour drive with a nearly empty large device and pick up 5000 mah instead of 1000 mah? Diminishing returns will hit well before they can approach the performance of a wall charger plugged into the interior V2L connector for those that have it.

It seems the manufacturers are assuming most drivers and passengers use the chargers to "top up" or avoid depleting a small device during 99% of aggregate commuting, and they are probably not far off. My quick charge capable phone (Note 10 plus) ends every drive with more charge than I started, despite using nav and streaming music via AA during every drive longer than a few miles.
 

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I remember seeing a news article that Hyundai is totally changing to a new supplier for the entertainment/navigation system, just don't remember where! But that could explain the lack of some functionality. EVs are just like laptop computers, smart TVs and mobile phones etc - the technology is already obsolete when they are released.
Hyundia will be moving to Nvidia's new 'Nvidia Drive' platform. I'm guessing that the Genesis G60 will be the first to have it.


Sure wish these systems were upgradable ! (I know someone who was able to update to a new 'computer' in a ten year old Ford Cmax !)
 

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Does the higher capacity and smaller design, or even higher bandwidth have a material benefit in the car? I figure whatever cables one uses for the car, stay in the car. $10 at amazon for an A-to-C cable, or $9 for a C-to-C cable, with both providing an identical experience except when plugging them in, after which the car side connector never gets a second thought... am I missing something?

For me personally, I have plenty of A-to-C cables and would be annoyed if I had to buy C-to-C cables because my car lacked A ports.

Edit: something else occurred to me. For that front USB port, where someone might possibly knock the cable either moving around or reaching for something, I much prefer it is an A connector, especially a right-angle one, with its sturdier construction and wider trace width contacts.
You are missing that USB-C charges faster than USB-A. On an iPhone for example, the USB-C to lightning cable is 4x faster than a standard USB-A. That is as long as Hyundai actually adapts USB-PD which they should.
 

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You are missing that USB-C charges faster than USB-A. On an iPhone for example, the USB-C to lightning cable is 4x faster than a standard USB-A. That is as long as Hyundai actually adapts USB-PD which they should.
I disregarded the faster charging on the presumption that in-car USB C chargers--especially in consumer class products--still use the same charging circuitry as the legacy ones. I would be happy to be proven wrong.

And it might just be my lifestyle, but I don't see faster charging in-car USB ports having a great impact on quality of life. Nowhere near the other advantages that the E-GMP vehicles bring to the table, and to me, probably not worth the cost. Heck, if I had the option of buying a $10 C-to-C cable to increase charging speed in an existing C port, I probably wouldn't even bother. Of course, YMMV.
 

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I disregarded the faster charging on the presumption that in-car USB C chargers--especially in consumer class products--still use the same charging circuitry as the legacy ones. I would be happy to be proven wrong.
I guess it depends on the manufacturer. On the Tesla it is 27W (PD) and on the Mach-e it is 15W (non-PD).
Both are better than the max of 10W on the USB-A.
 

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You are missing that USB-C charges faster than USB-A
Yes, capable of, which doesn't mean the maximum power is actually implemented - it is just a connector standard. I read many complaints here that Android devices would discharge while plugged in (presumably with a map program running and streaming music) with the original Ioniq. No complaints with iPhone users (including me) - my phone charged fine with heavy use while driving. While Android specific, there was clearly an underlying technical issue with the Ioniq too, even at USB-A max power.

Similarly, cables may have the connectors you need, but may not be able support the maximum connector design power or data speeds. Likely not an issue with cars. Yet.
 

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Yes, capable of, which doesn't mean the maximum power is actually implemented - it is just a connector standard.
Yes and the standard would be 5V at 3A for non PD implementations. That is 15W.

I read many complaints here that Android devices would discharge while plugged in (presumably with a map program running and streaming music) with the original Ioniq.
That would be because those USB ports are only 5W.

Similarly, cables may have the connectors you need, but may not be able support the maximum connector design power or data speeds. Likely not an issue with cars. Yet.
I'm not sure what exactly you mean by this. If a cable is USB certified or came with the device, it supports the full power standard.
 

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I'm not sure what exactly you mean by this. If a cable is USB certified or came with the device, it supports the full power standard.
Certified? By whom? Not sure certification drives third party sales of cables. In any case, power standards possibly compliant. Data standards often not. Came with device? No cable came with my car. That would have been nice!
 

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Certified? By whom? Not sure certification drives third party sales of cables. In any case, power standards possibly compliant. Data standards often not. Came with device? No cable came with my car. That would have been nice!
Umm, USB. You do know that USB is a certification correct? Like USB is actually the name of a company that comes up with the standard. It’s not just the name of a cable.
Also since when is your car a “device”. I’m obviously talking about the device you are charging, like your phone or tablet. You know, the thing that gets plugged into the USB port to charge.
 

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Nothing wrong with USB C at all, but there is a difference between having a USB C connector and providing USB C level of service. Just because a charging port in a car is physically a USB C connector doesn't mean it will support anyone's device's elevated capabilities.

Since USB C ports have started appearing on cars, I have been under the impression that the only difference is the form factor, not the hardware behind it. This article seems to state this as well: My car has a USB C Port. Is it better? It's from 2020 though, and may be outdated. This passage sums up my (perhaps outdated) mindset:

An oval hole doesn’t mean the underlying circuitry is running the latest USB data specification, or that it has more juice on tap for charging your phone. But it might …

I suspect many reviewers are under the impression that if the physical format is there, then the hardware must be too.

Anyone have more recent info if newer cars have any different charging hardware behind USB C ports than they already have for USB A ports? It would be really interesting to know if the USB C ports in the EV 6 charge any quicker.

If the commotion is over not only having the physical form factor but also the elevated--and certainly more expensive--charging hardware, that's a different prospect for the manufacturer. How many drivers are willing to pay more or give up other features so that a probably small minority can start a one hour drive with a nearly empty large device and pick up 5000 mah instead of 1000 mah? Diminishing returns will hit well before they can approach the performance of a wall charger plugged into the interior V2L connector for those that have it.

It seems the manufacturers are assuming most drivers and passengers use the chargers to "top up" or avoid depleting a small device during 99% of aggregate commuting, and they are probably not far off. My quick charge capable phone (Note 10 plus) ends every drive with more charge than I started, despite using nav and streaming music via AA during every drive longer than a few miles.
Type C is still way better than Type A if for no reason other than you can’t plug it in the wrong way. Irregardless of charging speeds or other issues mentioned, USB C is standard equipment on most model year 2022 vehicles. Its a glaring omission by Hyundai as is no wireless Apple CarPlay. To those who disagree apparently don't upgrade their technology often or don't use iPhones.
 

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Type C is still way better than Type A if for no reason other than you can’t plug it in the wrong way. Irregardless of charging speeds or other issues mentioned, USB C is standard equipment on most model year 2022 vehicles. Its a glaring omission by Hyundai as is no wireless Apple CarPlay. To those who disagree apparently don't upgrade their technology often or don't use iPhones.
Globally, 3 out of 4 phones aren't iPhones. I buy the best Android phone I can afford and update it as long as I can, if necessary by installing an alternative OS such as Lineage.

My Mate 10 Pro still opens Google Maps in about a second, so no point sending it to landfill just yet. USB-A suits me fine: it's only a £2 cable to go from A to C and it came with the phone foc. At least the Ioniq 5 supports Android Auto and CarPlay, unlike some other EVs…

Incidentally, my phone is carefully kept between 20% and 80% charge and, after five years, still reports 91% battery capacity compared to new (originally 4000 mAh), so it runs around 2 days between charges.
 

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Globally, 3 out of 4 phones aren't iPhones. I buy the best Android phone I can afford and update it as long as I can, if necessary by installing an alternative OS such as Lineage.

My Mate 10 Pro still opens Google Maps in about a second, so no point sending it to landfill just yet. USB-A suits me fine: it's only a £2 cable to go from A to C and it came with the phone foc. At least the Ioniq 5 supports Android Auto and CarPlay, unlike some other EVs…

Incidentally, my phone is carefully kept between 20% and 80% charge and, after five years, still reports 91% battery capacity compared to new (originally 4000 mAh), so it runs around 2 days between charges.
Globally most vehicles aren’t EVs, so that is a moot point. I would say most EV owners of $40K+ vehicles use Apple. I don’t see a android pay option on Tesla’s site. You guys/gals don’t give up on this USB C and wireless CarPlay thing. Why can’t we expect manufacturers to provide the latest tech on their 2022 vehicles? Hyundai is the premium brand in Korea not Kia and USB C is in the EV6.
 

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Valid point, USB A and Wired CarPlay should be standard on Hyundai's most expensive vehicle (Nexo doesn't count). I am coming out of an ID 4 and it had USB C and wireless CarPlay on all models. (Note: MagSafe on iPhones need USB C to power otherwise you need to use cigarette lighter and USB C adaptor)
Hyundai doesn't have it all figured out though:
Auto dimming the screens is stupid when it occurs with every underpass. Needing to press the start button when I can just press brake pedal to start. Having a parking brake switch when it can be eliminated. Having a conventional headlight stalk that needs to be twisted manually to turn headlights auto/off and returned manually to its neutral position to stop auto lane change. No hard climate control button. No quick access to seat heaters/heated steering wheel and no automation under certain temperatures or occupancy detection and annoyingly turning off after what seems like only 30 mins. Poor main screen infortainment layout that gets blocked when steering wheel is adjusted to a lower setting. Super tiny side mirrors and lack of a rear wiper are sub optimal. A driver's seat that doesn't go low enough for some driver's over 6 ft. The worst LED headlights I have ever experienced. I-Pedal resetting each time car is put into park. Having to come to a complete stop to shift into drive or reverse is annoying with an electric car with no transmission. Auto wipers, lighted footwells and powered seats (both sides) should be standard in this price range.
the above sounds like the I5 is a bad car choice
 

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the above sounds like the I5 is a bad car choice
I have a Limited and I think it's a great choice. I think they have a lot figured out as I would counter most of these items as minor or a non-issue for me. For example:

"Super tiny mirrors": really??? Never noticed. When I use my blinker I normally use the camera view on the display and/or the blind side indicators. Or the camera while backing up.

"Come to a complete stop to shift into drive or reverse". Why would I want to be moving?
 

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I have a Limited and I think it's a great choice. I think they have a lot figured out as I would counter most of these items as minor or a non-issue for me. For example:

"Super tiny mirrors": really??? Never noticed. When I use my blinker I normally use the camera view on the display and/or the blind side indicators. Or the camera while backing up.

"Come to a complete stop to shift into drive or reverse". Why would I want to be moving?
Only the $55K Limited has camera indicators so the mirrors are still tiny to me. Why do I need to come to a complete stop in the I5 to change drive modes if every prior EV I have owned doesn’t require it?
 

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The Korean twins are currently the best of the non Tesla EV’s. Their drivetrains, battery technology, build quality, and charging compete competitively with Tesla. IMHO they need to spin off the Ioniq brand, focus more on software, and quickly get serious about benchmarking Tesla. Tesla is not distracted by producing ICE and continues to refine its EV platforms by removing unnecessary parts developing multi use parts/systems, assembling vehicles quicker with castings/less parts and is collecting massive amounts of data on its EVs due market share and its supercomputer Dojo. Additionally, improvements to manufacturing, vehicle hardware + software, get integrated as developed without waiting for the next model year or redesign.
And many would argue that the "Korean twins" are better than the Teslas as well. I've heard of chronic fit and finish and quality issues with Tesla, but reviews for the "twins" give a big thumbs up on these aspects. Living in the Bay Area near the Tesla plant, I see and hear of a lot of problems with cars coming out of Tesla's plant. My neighbor across the street has had his 2021 model Y in for problems at least five times now. They are always taken care of under warrantee, but his hassle of dealing with repairs for five times in less than a year is a show stopper for even considering a Tesla. I would never consider such an unreliable car.

And besides, I don't believe in joining a cult. ;)
 
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