Hyundai IONIQ Forum banner
41 - 60 of 70 Posts

·
Registered
2022 IONIQ5 Limited AWD Cyber Gray
Joined
·
926 Posts
With tesla the maximum warranty is only 80,000km where I live, which I would blow through in 2.5 years. With hyundai its 100,000km, of which only 3yr/60k I believe for electronics. But for around $3000 can buy extended warranty which bumps everything to the battery/power train warranty of 8 years/160k.
Buddy just blew through his 50k warranty on his M3P and at 51K the front started making horrible noises. Service center says is the linkage in the suspension but it's not failing and would thus be an out of warranty repair (apparently designed just to last the length of the warranty) and would cost him over $5,000 to fix.

Boss has had his cameras, roof, front drive unit replaced during that initial period.

There's a reason Tesla ranks in the bottom of long term dependibility. They're making great strides to improve but when you start at 80's Chryslers levels it's a pretty big jump to where OEMs are now. It's great they can fix so much with software but it's the build of the vehicles and the service experience most friends with them have had (several swearing off the brand after early model s experience due to quality, long term durability and service center malaise issues) - that would keep me from buying one were it the same price.

In fact I walked my parents through buying an EV and they paid considerably more than the Model 3 price for a Polestar 2 in large part due to ride quality and general quality issues as well as concerns of long term durability and upkeep costs.

Anywho, buddy with the blown suspension just bought a new 2022 M3P because 'he likes to go fast'. I get the "telsa is an ev charger hellcat" folks. If just going fast is your thing and you don't care about any of the quality issues or potential long term issues, great - it's not that much difference service and upkeep wise than a porsche or a bmw and it's in many cases cheaper. I just value my time too much to fight with the service center or have the vehicle in for repair for months because parts are hard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Buddy just blew through his 50k warranty on his M3P and at 51K the front started making horrible noises. Service center says is the linkage in the suspension but it's not failing and would thus be an out of warranty repair (apparently designed just to last the length of the warranty) and would cost him over $5,000 to fix.

Boss has had his cameras, roof, front drive unit replaced during that initial period.

There's a reason Tesla ranks in the bottom of long term dependibility. They're making great strides to improve but when you start at 80's Chryslers levels it's a pretty big jump to where OEMs are now. It's great they can fix so much with software but it's the build of the vehicles and the service experience most friends with them have had (several swearing off the brand after early model s experience due to quality, long term durability and service center malaise issues) - that would keep me from buying one were it the same price.

In fact I walked my parents through buying an EV and they paid considerably more than the Model 3 price for a Polestar 2 in large part due to ride quality and general quality issues as well as concerns of long term durability and upkeep costs.

Anywho, buddy with the blown suspension just bought a new 2022 M3P because 'he likes to go fast'. I get the "telsa is an ev charger hellcat" folks. If just going fast is your thing and you don't care about any of the quality issues or potential long term issues, great - it's not that much difference service and upkeep wise than a porsche or a bmw and it's in many cases cheaper. I just value my time too much to fight with the service center or have the vehicle in for repair for months because parts are hard.
Newer Tesla quality control has been much improved. The ones having issues are the older ones that were the initial runs of new models like M3/MY. Although stories like you have describes are not uncommon, I would caution that basing current reliability off last 2-3 years stat is not entirely accurate. I would think for people that took delivery of Tesla last 6 month, most have been relatively satisfied. But I do agree that Tesla at this point has raised price so much that I don't know if it's 10k or 20k better than the competitors. There are a lot of good choices out there, I5 included.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Buddy just blew through his 50k warranty on his M3P and at 51K the front started making horrible noises.
Upper control arm ball joints, very common on 3/Y, to the point that every service now includes a TSB to "reseal" them with some silicone (poor tech trying to manipulate frozen silicone grease in my garage at 20F in February had some words on that...) Shouldn't be anywhere near 5k though.

Newer Tesla quality control has been much improved.
That'd be a nice thing to see. Unfortunately, I have a 2021 and a 2022 Y in the family and between the two of them, they've had:
  • three repeater camera replacements
  • one windshield reseal for a water leak
  • one heat pump replacement (no heat, metal debris in the compressor) and another one coming up (no a/c, different cars too)
  • endless squeaks, rattles, and closure/window adjustments
 
  • Like
Reactions: zamafir

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
That'd be a nice thing to see. Unfortunately, I have a 2021 and a 2022 Y in the family and between the two of them, they've had:
  • three repeater camera replacements
  • one windshield reseal for a water leak
  • one heat pump replacement (no heat, metal debris in the compressor) and another one coming up (no a/c, different cars too)
  • endless squeaks, rattles, and closure/window adjustments
That's unfortunate. We have 2022 MYP and 2022 MYLR, and both are perfect. Sorry to hear you have these issues, but at least Tesla should fix those for free under warranty.
 

·
Registered
2022 IONIQ5 Limited AWD Cyber Gray
Joined
·
926 Posts
Upper control arm ball joints, very common on 3/Y, to the point that every service now includes a TSB to "reseal" them with some silicone (poor tech trying to manipulate frozen silicone grease in my garage at 20F in February had some words on that...) Shouldn't be anywhere near 5k though.
Nope but there seem to be pretty common examples of tesla service finding excuses to deny warranty or charge for things that I wouldn't expect other OEMs to.

It's my same basic point, if you're an average car buyer who typically does not take their vehicle in between regular intervals and typically doesn't have out of warranty issue (I've had one over the last 20 years and 6 cars, infamous VW water pump fun) and aren't used to extraordinarily high repair costs when situations are outside of warranty, that should all be considered when buying a tesla as opposed to an OEM EV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
It doesn't cost $5k to replace upper control arms. Below is the estimate from the Tesla forums and other people have around the same costs as the 2018 model years tended to have this issue. The newer ones are updated. My Tesla service center is waaaay cheaper than what Lexus and BMW charged me.

Font Parallel Screenshot Rectangle Number
 

·
Registered
2022 IONIQ5 Limited AWD Cyber Gray
Joined
·
926 Posts
It doesn't cost $5k to replace upper control arms. Below is the estimate from the Tesla forums and other people have around the same costs as the 2018 model years tended to have this issue. The newer ones are updated. My Tesla service center is waaaay cheaper than what Lexus and BMW charged me.

View attachment 43035
Nice! Just going off what he mentioned, 5k repair for 'linkage' compelling him to buy a new car, didn't ask for a print out - maybe it was just an excuse to upgrade to a 2022 to get the features that were left out of his build like ambient lighting lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Nice! Just going off what he mentioned, 5k repair for 'linkage' compelling him to buy a new car, didn't ask for a print out - maybe it was just an excuse to upgrade to a 2022 to get the features that were left out of his build like ambient lighting lol.
Great excuse to get a new car...same strategy i use with my wife :D
 

·
Registered
waiting for Ioniq 5 to come in
Joined
·
57 Posts
I have a Tesla Model 3 SR+ and an Ioniq 5 RWD. They are vastly different cars and your preference will really depend on your needs, but for me I drive the Tesla every chance I get, and only take the Ioniq if I'm taking the kids somewhere.

For the driver there's no comparison. The Tesla is far easier to use, more comfortable (for me) to sit in, far, far more responsive and I seriously dislike the Ioniq suspension (it makes everyone in my family carsick). The Ioniq lane warning is loud and unpredictable and its auto-steering is not worth my time, while both those things are almost faultless on the Tesla. The Tesla's UI and particularly the navigation is far better, and in Australia we don't get a phone app with the Ioniq.

However if you're looking to turn heads or carry several people, you'll want the Ioniq. The Ioniq has superb interior build quality and the airiness of the interior is amazing. Everyone loves the back seat, despite the weird omissions like lack of auto up/down on the window buttons, and needing to pull a lever on the side of the seat to drop it forward or lift it up when using the full boot/trunk space.

The Tesla has more highway range, btw. Even my old one will go as far at highway speeds as my RWD Ioniq 5 (longest range available at launch), and the new base Model 3 goes 10% further.
But no federal tax rebate on the Teslas in America.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
You mean like every ICE vehicle ever? Come on people, using the charging network is no different than what we‘ve all always done with cars: go to a service station to fill up. At least with a DCFC you don’t get spilled fuel on your hands. Now the big EV difference is charging at home overnight…I get that…and it is a very big plus for EVs. But for those living where home-charging is a challenge or impossible like apartments for example, using the “service station” approach is not wholly catastrophic.
I think you should try it yourself. Baking in the 95F heat, no shade, fighting with EA chargers that won’t initiate, no facilities nearby… for 30mins each time. Heck sub freezing would probably be worse. Nothing like a gas station.

Only the retired and folks with too much time on their hands would do this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
I think you should try it yourself. Baking in the 95F heat, no shade, fighting with EA chargers that won’t initiate, no facilities nearby… for 30mins each time. Heck sub freezing would probably be worse. Nothing like a gas station.

Only the retired and folks with too much time on their hands would do this.
Coming from Tesla, EA is such a headache between lack of location, clunky initialization, ability for someone to turn off my charging session... Glad I am able to home charge. Like my I5 but will continue to road trip in the MY.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
171 Posts
I think you should try it yourself. Baking in the 95F heat, no shade, fighting with EA chargers that won’t initiate, no facilities nearby… for 30mins each time. Heck sub freezing would probably be worse. Nothing like a gas station.

Only the retired and folks with too much time on their hands would do this.
I do “try it myself” every road trip and I’ve taken dozens from 600 to 6000 miles each. Admittedly I’m in my Tesla Model 3 since I can’t get an Ioniq5 this year or anytime soon, and the Supercharger experience is just fine. I will concede that these charging stations are rarely under any cover unlike nearly all gas pumps today, but that’s only for the connection and disconnect so less than a minute. During charging, if there’s nothing nearby which is rarely the case with a Supercharger, I sit in the well-airconditioned vehicle, not standing outside next to a gas pump with the vehicle shut down (required in my state, don’t know about others). I also catch up on the news, can play YouTube videos, surf the web, whatever during the stop.

Lastly, since I ”ride the bottom of the battery” my charging stops are much more like 10-12 minutes, nowhere near 30. Oh, and a side note here, cost is about $8, not the $60 it takes to “charge up” my ICE vehicle. Yeah, I get you: “Nothing like a gas station.”
 

·
Registered
2022 IONIQ5 Limited AWD Cyber Gray
Joined
·
926 Posts
I do “try it myself” every road trip and I’ve taken dozens from 600 to 6000 miles each. Admittedly I’m in my Tesla Model 3 since I can’t get an Ioniq5 this year or anytime soon, and the Supercharger experience is just fine. I will concede that these charging stations are rarely under any cover unlike nearly all gas pumps today, but that’s only for the connection and disconnect so less than a minute. During charging, if there’s nothing nearby which is rarely the case with a Supercharger, I sit in the well-airconditioned vehicle, not standing outside next to a gas pump with the vehicle shut down (required in my state, don’t know about others). I also catch up on the news, can play YouTube videos, surf the web, whatever during the stop.

Lastly, since I ”ride the bottom of the battery” my charging stops are much more like 10-12 minutes, nowhere near 30. Oh, and a side note here, cost is about $8, not the $60 it takes to “charge up” my ICE vehicle. Yeah, I get you: “Nothing like a gas station.”
Right? I went to return some amazon orders and remembered there's a EA charger near by. Plugged in, 92 degrees out, in the sun, no bother, hopped in IONIQ5 AC on, 53% to 80% charge in 11 minutes at ~134 kW on a 150 kW charger, $0, unhooked, went on my marry way to return item, spent more time in the return line than I did charging :p.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
I do “try it myself” every road trip and I’ve taken dozens from 600 to 6000 miles each. Admittedly I’m in my Tesla Model 3 since I can’t get an Ioniq5 this year or anytime soon, and the Supercharger experience is just fine. I will concede that these charging stations are rarely under any cover unlike nearly all gas pumps today, but that’s only for the connection and disconnect so less than a minute. During charging, if there’s nothing nearby which is rarely the case with a Supercharger, I sit in the well-airconditioned vehicle, not standing outside next to a gas pump with the vehicle shut down (required in my state, don’t know about others). I also catch up on the news, can play YouTube videos, surf the web, whatever during the stop.

Lastly, since I ”ride the bottom of the battery” my charging stops are much more like 10-12 minutes, nowhere near 30. Oh, and a side note here, cost is about $8, not the $60 it takes to “charge up” my ICE vehicle. Yeah, I get you: “Nothing like a gas station.”
As a former Model 3 and Y owner… it’s a different experience with EA because it’s not plug and charge (well my Mach-E has it but if a charger is broken like the two I hit last evening in Daytona before I went to the track… you can’t do anything about it) and reliability is like a box of chocolates.

Also with current Tesla DC charging rates… you are paying close to gas prices if you had a 30-40mpg car. Especially since most EVs have 3.3 mi/kWh or less effiency on the highways and with increased Supercharger rates. The Model 3 is one of the most effient EVs on the planet so it’s bound to be cheaper but it was cheaper for me to drive my Telluride than my Model Y on long road trips.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Coming from Tesla, EA is such a headache between lack of location, clunky initialization, ability for someone to turn off my charging session... Glad I am able to home charge. Like my I5 but will continue to road trip in the MY.
It’s amazing how much simpler Supercharger charging is. Even my grandmother could do it.

EA continues to be a running joke in Florida. This non-profit experiment needs to die. 50 states have submitted their NEVI plans and hopefully they don’t give a dime to EA and work with and fund local utilities to build chargers (which is happening in FL - including a large 20 stall hub).
 

·
Registered
2022 IONIQ5 Limited AWD Cyber Gray
Joined
·
926 Posts
It's amazing how varied the EA experiences are state to state. Florida has 35 EA stations while Los Angeles alone has 66 (San Diego 25, California has hundreds). I wonder if the experience is so much better here due to sheer volume, like tesla. Don't take this wrong, tesla DEFINITELY maintains their networks better - and they should having been around a decade longer with predominantly slower chargers that don't require liquid cooling - but most of the folks downright unhappy with EA seem to be in states with massively smaller EV adoption and trivial incentives for charging providers to expand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Own a M3P, bought new last September, and an Ioniq 5 Limited I bought new in February. Live in Williamsburg Va. both cars have been on road trips, both cars have just over 20k miles. Driven the Tesla to Orlando and western parts of NC. Ioniq 5 has been to Saratoga Springs NY monthly for the past 5 months, Niagara Falls CN last month, and to Miami. Never paid for charging on the road with the Ioniq, have struggled with different charging stations being in disrepair here and there. I have never had to wait for a charger in either car, came close last week in Carlisle Pa. Nothing more than routine maintenance on either car. Supercharger charging is definitely better than EA just based on connecting and never having hit a none working supercharger. In PA area with the Tesla today. Only took it because EA stations are a little farther apart and would have required about 100 extra miles of travel. Left Williamsburg with 100%. Spent 25 dollars in charging at two stations and I have 170 miles of range on the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
I have a I5 that I bought in May. I have a Tesla M3 RWD on order since February they moved the EDD from September to October and then to November now it's back to September. Not sure if they have a clue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Drove Model Y and really liked the way it drove except for the too stiff ride quality. The wind noise was horrible. The seat was a disaster for me, very personal thing. Also huge concerns about quality. SEL AWD is very quiet on freeway and super comfortable for me. Like having a major car company behind the vehicle.
 
41 - 60 of 70 Posts
Top