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Yeah I really want to get Mach-E as second car, but Ford manufacturing is a hot mess. I placed an order a month ago and i think it will take up to 1 year to get the car! So 2 weeks ago I found a dealer in NJ that will take waitlist at msrp for Ioniq Limited. It's supposed to be here in mid-April, will see how that works out. Also have Model Y Performance on order that't supposed to be delivered in May. Still have some time to think about this which one to go for.
Not a fan of the MYP. Take an overpriced crossover, add high maintenance wheels/tires, reduce range, and charge more. The bonus is you get it quicker and resale is great. MYLR with 19” is good enough but the wait is 6 months.

Yeah, Ford’s production is worse than a hot mess. I suspect 10 months will be the normal wait time but you can purchase it at MSRP which is rare for say the EV6 and “hit and miss” for the Ioniq 5. I personally prefer the EV6 over the Ioniq 5 but I would trust Hyundai dealers for service over Kia. The negative about the Limited is the real world range is less than the Y or Mach-E Premium ER because of the 20” wheels.

There’s no perfect EV. The suspension of the Ioniq 5 and EV6 is superior to others except for the Mach-E GTPE (adjustable suspension) so the ride is definitely more comfortable.
 

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Not a fan of the MYP. Take an overpriced crossover, add high maintenance wheels/tires, reduce range, and charge more. The bonus is you get it quicker and resale is great. MYLR with 19” is good enough but the wait is 6 months.

Yeah, Ford’s production is worse than a hot mess. I suspect 10 months will be the normal wait time but you can purchase it at MSRP which is rare for say the EV6 and “hit and miss” for the Ioniq 5. I personally prefer the EV6 over the Ioniq 5 but I would trust Hyundai dealers for service over Kia. The negative about the Limited is the real world range is less than the Y or Mach-E Premium ER because of the 20” wheels.

There’s no perfect EV. The suspension of the Ioniq 5 and EV6 is superior to others except for the Mach-E GTPE (adjustable suspension) so the ride is definitely more comfortable.

I was under the impression from numerous previous posts in both here and the Tesla forums that you did not own an Ioniq 5?
 

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I was under the impression from numerous previous posts in both here and the Tesla forums that you did not own an Ioniq 5?
Correct. I had to decline my Limited (technically I still have a deposit on one) in early Feb because Tesla suddenly forced delivery of a Y. I test drove all trims, watched the handoff videos, and was ready to be a Limited owner at that point... now with the EV6... I'm not so sure. And now that I have a Mach-E build date.. I'm basically prepared to trade my Y for the MME and hold off the Ioniq 5 and EV6 decision until 2023.
 

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Not a fan of the MYP. Take an overpriced crossover, add high maintenance wheels/tires, reduce range, and charge more. The bonus is you get it quicker and resale is great. MYLR with 19” is good enough but the wait is 6 months.

Yeah, Ford’s production is worse than a hot mess. I suspect 10 months will be the normal wait time but you can purchase it at MSRP which is rare for say the EV6 and “hit and miss” for the Ioniq 5. I personally prefer the EV6 over the Ioniq 5 but I would trust Hyundai dealers for service over Kia. The negative about the Limited is the real world range is less than the Y or Mach-E Premium ER because of the 20” wheels.

There’s no perfect EV. The suspension of the Ioniq 5 and EV6 is superior to others except for the Mach-E GTPE (adjustable suspension) so the ride is definitely more comfortable.
MYP is great. Love the drive and handle of the car. The interior space, trunk space and rear seat legroom just can’t be beat. If anyone knows another car offers this much space I would love to hear it. It’s a great family car with tons of space inside, and at the same time it’s super fun flooring it on the highway or off stop light. Also love all the entertainment options that are available. I don’t think it’s overpriced. It used to be 10k more than regular LR but now it’s only 5k, and with that you get upgraded wheel, -1 second in acceleration and much shorter wait time. I think it’s well worth it. Like you said the resale value is likely to hold up much better once Hyundai floods market with SE and SEL of Ioniq 5, not to mention that we are only 4-5 months away from 2023 model which supposedly fix a lot of annoyance on the 21 and 22 models. I have Limited on order, but I might switch to SE just to save money and not lose too much in depreciation.
 

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OP, I'm currently in the same boat as you in terms of deciding between the two. I've had my order in for a Limited since January and was given a Dec 2022 build date but was told by my dealer that it'll likely come earlier. I'm still not expecting anything sooner than fall, though. The Model 3 would come sooner than the Ioniq 5 for sure.

One of the things I'm concerned about is also charging speed. I live in a condo with no outlets in my parking stalls so nightly charging isn't really possible for me. The closest public charger for me is a few blocks away but charges $/hr instead of $/kwh. Given the volatility in charging speed of the Ioniq 5, I may end sitting there longer than I want (and paying for the time) compared to if I were to charge at a Supercharger.

On the contrary, I do prefer the looks of the Ioniq 5 (subjective, of course), the increase in cargo space and AWD compared to the RWD Model 3 I'd be considering. The Federal and Provincial rebates of the Ioniq 5 don't hurt either.

Like many have said, there are pros and cons to both - as with many things in life. Currently, I'm leaning towards pulling the trigger on the Model 3 due to it arriving sooner.
 

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MYP is great. Love the drive and handle of the car. The interior space, trunk space and rear seat legroom just can’t be beat. If anyone knows another car offers this much space I would love to hear it. It’s a great family car with tons of space inside, and at the same time it’s super fun flooring it on the highway or off stop light.

I have Limited on order, but I might switch to SE just to save money and not lose too much in depreciation.
I think the Ioniq 5 (and ID.4) make for great family wagons because of their more
comfortable rides even with less than stellar handling. The Model Y straddles sportiness (EV6 and Mach-E) and family comfort (ID.4) but the price point is the major sticking point for many. Sadly I would take none of these EVs off roads (heck off pavement too) which is why I’m eager to test drive the Solterra.

As for resale, pick the Limited. Supply and demand rule. I know folks with SEL who received poor trade in or sell offers. Probably worse for the SEs with how many sit on lots. The Limited has the 360 cam which my major annoyance missing from the Y.
 

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OP, I'm currently in the same boat as you in terms of deciding between the two. I've had my order in for a Limited since January and was given a Dec 2022 build date but was told by my dealer that it'll likely come earlier. I'm still not expecting anything sooner than fall, though. The Model 3 would come sooner than the Ioniq 5 for sure.

One of the things I'm concerned about is also charging speed. I live in a condo with no outlets in my parking stalls so nightly charging isn't really possible for me. The closest public charger for me is a few blocks away but charges $/hr instead of $/kwh. Given the volatility in charging speed of the Ioniq 5, I may end sitting there longer than I want (and paying for the time) compared to if I were to charge at a Supercharger.

On the contrary, I do prefer the looks of the Ioniq 5 (subjective, of course), the increase in cargo space and AWD compared to the RWD Model 3 I'd be considering. The Federal and Provincial rebates of the Ioniq 5 don't hurt either.

Like many have said, there are pros and cons to both - as with many things in life. Currently, I'm leaning towards pulling the trigger on the Model 3 due to it arriving sooner.
I don’t recommend ev if you can’t charge at home. Having constantly going outside to charge gets old real fast.
 

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I don’t recommend ev if you can’t charge at home. Having constantly going outside to charge gets old real fast.
This times a million.

I tried a pure DC charging lifestyle since I bought an ID.4 first with 3 years free charging... after a few weeks, I never wanted to visit another DC charger again. Imagine NOT having a shower or bathroom at home and having to use public toilets and gyms.
 

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I don’t recommend ev if you can’t charge at home. Having constantly going outside to charge gets old real fast.
Even when it’s free. I can charge 20-80 on my ChargePoint HomeFlex @ 48 amps delivered for less the $5 at home.

Even for a retired guy, I’m not gonna burn an hour to save a fin.


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And I will toss this in-- why limit the choice to just two. Have a look at Fisker Ocean, Vin Fast, Imperium Motors/Skywell, KIA, BMW, Polestar and a few others. In the end, buy the EV that suits 95% of your driving needs
 

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And I will toss this in-- why limit the choice to just two. Have a look at Fisker Ocean, Vin Fast, Imperium Motors/Skywell, KIA, BMW, Polestar and a few others. In the end, buy the EV that suits 95% of your driving needs
None of them as practical as family car as these two, also half of the car on your list are not even available for immediate delivery.
 

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I don’t recommend ev if you can’t charge at home. Having constantly going outside to charge gets old real fast.
I've definitely considered this in deciding on a full EV. Luckily this won't be my primary vehicle (will still be maintaining an ICE car) and there is free charging available at my work place so this should reduce or eliminate any trips out solely for charging.

This times a million.

I tried a pure DC charging lifestyle since I bought an ID.4 first with 3 years free charging... after a few weeks, I never wanted to visit another DC charger again. Imagine NOT having a shower or bathroom at home and having to use public toilets and gyms.
Thanks! The analogy made me laugh and is a fair and accurate comparison
 

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I live in an area where there are hundreds of Teslas on the street. For me: zero appeal. I considered fab-four BEVs that I thought might become available in late 2021/early 2022. Ordered a Ford Mach-e last year, deliveries continue to be much delayed. I waitlisted EV6 and Ioniq 5, but not VW ID4.
Every buyer has their own suite of likes and dislikes. I'm happy that there are choices.
I'm quite satisfied that a Hyundai Ioniq 5 came my way, despite markup (which are found at more dealers than not).
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^
I live in an area where there are hundreds of Teslas on the street. For me: zero appeal. I considered fab-four BEVs that I thought might become available in late 2021/early 2022. Ordered a Ford Mach-e last year, deliveries continue to be much delayed. I waitlisted EV6 and Ioniq 5, but not VW ID4.
Every buyer has their own suite of likes and dislikes. I'm happy that there are choices.
I'm quite satisfied that a Hyundai Ioniq 5 came my way, despite markup (which are found at more dealers than not).
Fair points. To be honest, every car I've looked at had their pros and cons. I really liked the Ioniq 5 and never considered a Tesla (same reason as you - they're everywhere in my city) until I realized how long I'd be waiting for the Ioniq 5 in comparison. I really needed the car sooner rather later and yesterday I finally pulled the trigger on a Model 3. The earlier delivery date combined with a more accessible charging network in my city resulted in me ditching the Ioniq 5. I'm still keeping my pre-order in the event that someone in my family decides to take it (which I hope they do).
 

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I have a Tesla Model 3 SR+ and an Ioniq 5 RWD. They are vastly different cars and your preference will really depend on your needs, but for me I drive the Tesla every chance I get, and only take the Ioniq if I'm taking the kids somewhere.

For the driver there's no comparison. The Tesla is far easier to use, more comfortable (for me) to sit in, far, far more responsive and I seriously dislike the Ioniq suspension (it makes everyone in my family carsick). The Ioniq lane warning is loud and unpredictable and its auto-steering is not worth my time, while both those things are almost faultless on the Tesla. The Tesla's UI and particularly the navigation is far better, and in Australia we don't get a phone app with the Ioniq.

However if you're looking to turn heads or carry several people, you'll want the Ioniq. The Ioniq has superb interior build quality and the airiness of the interior is amazing. Everyone loves the back seat, despite the weird omissions like lack of auto up/down on the window buttons, and needing to pull a lever on the side of the seat to drop it forward or lift it up when using the full boot/trunk space.

The Tesla has more highway range, btw. Even my old one will go as far at highway speeds as my RWD Ioniq 5 (longest range available at launch), and the new base Model 3 goes 10% further.
 

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I'm debating an Ioniq 5 and a Tesla 3 standard range. I would almost never go more than 150km between home charges except for possibly a half dozen road trips a year which would be in the summer when fast charging should work well, unlike the winter. The tesla would cost $10,000 more but would probably have $10,000 better resale value in 5-6 years because of the brand.

I read about problems on here, slow charging under in the winter, draining 12v batteries, climate control that doesn't work properly, scheduled departure heating not working, overnight scheduled charging not working, lack of rear wiper, etc.. and I'm wondering if these are outliers. Then again I'm not on a Tesla forum to see how many people are having issues with their new cars over there..

The model 3 standard range is a little bit less than the Ioniq 5 RWD long range, but i imagine at real world speeds (not 90km/h), the Tesla probably comes out on top because of it's more aerodynamic profile.

So to those who own both, how do they compare? Which did you enjoy more? If you could only own one, which would it be?

I contacted a couple of people selling used tesla's on facebook, and it seems many of them had a lot of repairs (suspension, etc) in their first 4-5 years of ownership, and many complained about the quality of service, and difficult getting quick service. But reading this forum, that seems to be an issue with the Ioniq 5 as well.. no parts, dealers who can't diagnose issues, and don't know how to fix these cars.

Anyways, I'm used to Toyota camry levels of reliability, so I know it won't be like that for either of these cars, but just trying to get a better idea of what I'm getting into so I don't have any regrets :)
Tesla Model 3 versus Hyundai Ionic5

When you buy an electric car you’re buying not just a car body but also a battery and software. The short story is you get a lot more car body for your money with Ioniq5; the Ioniq5 battery for the rear-wheel-drive (RWD) variant has an edge in drving range, but both are great for most trips. And Tesla shines in the software department. We’ve had the Tesla since September and the Ioniq5 just since February, so I’m still learning my way around it. Here’s a more detailed look at both cars.

Car bodies

For roughly the same amount of money, with Tesla we got a sedan and with Hyundai we got a mini SUV. The Model 3 has a glass roof which contributes significantly to heat gain in the cabin. Most owners get aftermarket tinting, which cost us another $800+. There’s no frame around the windows, so every time you open and shut the door, the windows automatically lower and rise to protect the gasket. The Tesla needs special jack pods if it’s jacked up. The Ioniq is a more solid car. I find both cars comfortable to sit in. Both handle well. The Tesla has legendary acceleration, but the Ioniq has plenty of pep.

Batteries.

The Tesla model 3 has a range of 250 miles versus the Ioniq 3 range of 337 miles. (Ioniq5 RWD rated at 302 EPA but ours is over-spec). The Ioniq5 reportedly recharges in 18 minutes—we haven’t tested this yet. We took the Tesla on a road trip recently and were able to charge in 30 to 45 minutes. Tesla has an extensive range of Tesla rechargers nationwide and we had no trouble finding rechargers along interstates. It's also possible to use an adapter and use other recharging stations as well. We haven’t taken the Ioniq on a road trip yet, but road apps show lots of chargers for it as well.

We have the iron based (LFP) Tesla battery and it is projected to last for about 4000 cycles or 1,000,000 miles. The ioniq5 battery will last 1500 cycles which translates to about 400,000 miles. The Ioniq5 battery is better in terms of range and cold weather performance but for most driving you are fine in either car. Tesla’s battery is more efficient in using less electrical power.

Software

Both have assisted driving features. The adaptive cruise control works really well on both. Both have one foot driving, where the car starts to brake as you lift your foot from the accelerator. Once you get used to it, this is a really nice feature. It works well on the Tesla, but on the ioniq5 it's very weak. I like the Ioniq5 blind spot warnings on the screen right in front of the driver. Tesla has a a side camera that kicks on when you use the turn signal but I find this less helpful. They both have lane keeping assistance, but you have to keep your hands on the wheel and move it slightly to prove you're still paying attention. Sometimes the car brakes when it doesn't need to, especially the Tesla. This is a feature that is sometimes more trouble than it's worth on both cars. You can give voice commands on both cars. Tesla has tried to automate as many features as it can, and get rid of all knobs. The Ioniq automates a lot, but not as much and still has some knobs. The Ioniq5 is not self-driving. The Tesla has a “full self-driving” mode that costs extra. We did not opt for it. According to online reviews, it works 8 out of 10 times.

When it comes to software beyond assisted driving, Tesla is in a class by itself. It has a whole suite of entertainment options including music, podcasts, games and videos. It comes with a toy box that includes an under the hood speaker, and famously, a fart sound (really Elon?) Some of the features are more practical . Your phone is the key to the car and you can do many functions remotely using the Tesla app. For example you can start the heater or A/C while you’re still in the restaurant. You can see if the car is charged. One of the nicest features on Tesla is that when you enter long distance driving directions it will automatically select recharging stations along the route and will even automatically update the selection based on your realized driving conditions. Tesla regularly sends over-the-air software updates.

The buying experience

When we purchased the Tesla, it cost $44k (total) and there were no Federal credits for it. Tesla uses stores, not dealers, so there is no dealer markup. And the whole purchase transaction is on-line. Unfortunately demand for the cars is so high that since our purchase the price has gone up significantly. As of March 15 the price has gone up tp $53k (total) and the current delivery time is July, 2022. We had to make an appointment to test drive the car, and nobody from the store goes with you. We filled out the order online, then waited 3 months. Tesla’s on-line delivery tool changed the delivery date almost every other day. If you don't pick it up within 3 days of the final date, Tesla will sell it to somebody else. The wait till delivery is popularly called “delivery ****” on-line.

The total cost for the Ioniq5 was $51.5k but we expect to get a federal rebate of $7.5k.so for us, so the price is the same. Dealer markups are universal and vary widely from $500 (a few) up to $10,000 or more (many). And EVERY car comes with dealer-installed (junk) options for $400-$700. We traveled three hours out of state to get a RWD-drive/long-range car with a markup of just $500. We didn't test drive the car before we put a refundable deposit on it, because they only started arriving in the US in January. Not all Hyundai dealers are certified to sell and repair Ioniq5. Our local dealer has applied for certification and I think this situation will change quickly.

Ironically one reason I bought the Ioniq is because I thought it would have less mechanical problems, but the heater and air conditioning didn't work when the car arrived. The Tesla has had no problem. My biggest rant is that when I went to get a bike rack for the Ioniq5, I discovered it needed a receiver hitch, and Hyundai does not offer them in the US yet. In Australia, you can get it factory installed!! HYUNDAI, IF YOU ARE LISTENING, PEOPLE BUY SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES BECAUSE THEY DO SPORTS!!

Overall, I really like both cars and being able to re-fuel at home at any time versus taking time to go to a gas station is a blast. The electric car has arrived.
 

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I'm debating an Ioniq 5 and a Tesla 3 standard range. I would almost never go more than 150km between home charges except for possibly a half dozen road trips a year which would be in the summer when fast charging should work well, unlike the winter. The tesla would cost $10,000 more but would probably have $10,000 better resale value in 5-6 years because of the brand.

I read about problems on here, slow charging under in the winter, draining 12v batteries, climate control that doesn't work properly, scheduled departure heating not working, overnight scheduled charging not working, lack of rear wiper, etc.. and I'm wondering if these are outliers. Then again I'm not on a Tesla forum to see how many people are having issues with their new cars over there..

The model 3 standard range is a little bit less than the Ioniq 5 RWD long range, but i imagine at real world speeds (not 90km/h), the Tesla probably comes out on top because of it's more aerodynamic profile.

So to those who own both, how do they compare? Which did you enjoy more? If you could only own one, which would it be?

I contacted a couple of people selling used tesla's on facebook, and it seems many of them had a lot of repairs (suspension, etc) in their first 4-5 years of ownership, and many complained about the quality of service, and difficult getting quick service. But reading this forum, that seems to be an issue with the Ioniq 5 as well.. no parts, dealers who can't diagnose issues, and don't know how to fix these cars.

Anyways, I'm used to Toyota camry levels of reliability, so I know it won't be like that for either of these cars, but just trying to get a better idea of what I'm getting into so I don't have any regrets :)
I seriously wish I had watched this video before I purchased my Hyundai. They absolutely nail the problems. Point 4 they make should be point 1 as far as I am concerned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Tesla Model 3 versus Hyundai Ionic5

When you buy an electric car you’re buying not just a car body but also a battery and software. The short story is you get a lot more car body for your money with Ioniq5; the Ioniq5 battery for the rear-wheel-drive (RWD) variant has an edge in drving range, but both are great for most trips. And Tesla shines in the software department. We’ve had the Tesla since September and the Ioniq5 just since February, so I’m still learning my way around it. Here’s a more detailed look at both cars.

Car bodies

For roughly the same amount of money, with Tesla we got a sedan and with Hyundai we got a mini SUV. The Model 3 has a glass roof which contributes significantly to heat gain in the cabin. Most owners get aftermarket tinting, which cost us another $800+. There’s no frame around the windows, so every time you open and shut the door, the windows automatically lower and rise to protect the gasket. The Tesla needs special jack pods if it’s jacked up. The Ioniq is a more solid car. I find both cars comfortable to sit in. Both handle well. The Tesla has legendary acceleration, but the Ioniq has plenty of pep.

Batteries.

The Tesla model 3 has a range of 250 miles versus the Ioniq 3 range of 337 miles. (Ioniq5 RWD rated at 302 EPA but ours is over-spec). The Ioniq5 reportedly recharges in 18 minutes—we haven’t tested this yet. We took the Tesla on a road trip recently and were able to charge in 30 to 45 minutes. Tesla has an extensive range of Tesla rechargers nationwide and we had no trouble finding rechargers along interstates. It's also possible to use an adapter and use other recharging stations as well. We haven’t taken the Ioniq on a road trip yet, but road apps show lots of chargers for it as well.

We have the iron based (LFP) Tesla battery and it is projected to last for about 4000 cycles or 1,000,000 miles. The ioniq5 battery will last 1500 cycles which translates to about 400,000 miles. The Ioniq5 battery is better in terms of range and cold weather performance but for most driving you are fine in either car. Tesla’s battery is more efficient in using less electrical power.

Software

Both have assisted driving features. The adaptive cruise control works really well on both. Both have one foot driving, where the car starts to brake as you lift your foot from the accelerator. Once you get used to it, this is a really nice feature. It works well on the Tesla, but on the ioniq5 it's very weak. I like the Ioniq5 blind spot warnings on the screen right in front of the driver. Tesla has a a side camera that kicks on when you use the turn signal but I find this less helpful. They both have lane keeping assistance, but you have to keep your hands on the wheel and move it slightly to prove you're still paying attention. Sometimes the car brakes when it doesn't need to, especially the Tesla. This is a feature that is sometimes more trouble than it's worth on both cars. You can give voice commands on both cars. Tesla has tried to automate as many features as it can, and get rid of all knobs. The Ioniq automates a lot, but not as much and still has some knobs. The Ioniq5 is not self-driving. The Tesla has a “full self-driving” mode that costs extra. We did not opt for it. According to online reviews, it works 8 out of 10 times.

When it comes to software beyond assisted driving, Tesla is in a class by itself. It has a whole suite of entertainment options including music, podcasts, games and videos. It comes with a toy box that includes an under the hood speaker, and famously, a fart sound (really Elon?) Some of the features are more practical . Your phone is the key to the car and you can do many functions remotely using the Tesla app. For example you can start the heater or A/C while you’re still in the restaurant. You can see if the car is charged. One of the nicest features on Tesla is that when you enter long distance driving directions it will automatically select recharging stations along the route and will even automatically update the selection based on your realized driving conditions. Tesla regularly sends over-the-air software updates.

The buying experience

When we purchased the Tesla, it cost $44k (total) and there were no Federal credits for it. Tesla uses stores, not dealers, so there is no dealer markup. And the whole purchase transaction is on-line. Unfortunately demand for the cars is so high that since our purchase the price has gone up significantly. As of March 15 the price has gone up tp $53k (total) and the current delivery time is July, 2022. We had to make an appointment to test drive the car, and nobody from the store goes with you. We filled out the order online, then waited 3 months. Tesla’s on-line delivery tool changed the delivery date almost every other day. If you don't pick it up within 3 days of the final date, Tesla will sell it to somebody else. The wait till delivery is popularly called “delivery ****” on-line.

The total cost for the Ioniq5 was $51.5k but we expect to get a federal rebate of $7.5k.so for us, so the price is the same. Dealer markups are universal and vary widely from $500 (a few) up to $10,000 or more (many). And EVERY car comes with dealer-installed (junk) options for $400-$700. We traveled three hours out of state to get a RWD-drive/long-range car with a markup of just $500. We didn't test drive the car before we put a refundable deposit on it, because they only started arriving in the US in January. Not all Hyundai dealers are certified to sell and repair Ioniq5. Our local dealer has applied for certification and I think this situation will change quickly.

Ironically one reason I bought the Ioniq is because I thought it would have less mechanical problems, but the heater and air conditioning didn't work when the car arrived. The Tesla has had no problem. My biggest rant is that when I went to get a bike rack for the Ioniq5, I discovered it needed a receiver hitch, and Hyundai does not offer them in the US yet. In Australia, you can get it factory installed!! HYUNDAI, IF YOU ARE LISTENING, PEOPLE BUY SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES BECAUSE THEY DO SPORTS!!

Overall, I really like both cars and being able to re-fuel at home at any time versus taking time to go to a gas station is a blast. The electric car has arrived.
Great comparison, my big concern with these cars is repairs down the line, I’m used to driving reliable Japanese cars that have never had a single major issue in their first ten years beyond basic wear and tear on brakes and tires.

With tesla the maximum warranty is only 80,000km where I live, which I would blow through in 2.5 years. With hyundai its 100,000km, of which only 3yr/60k I believe for electronics. But for around $3000 can buy extended warranty which bumps everything to the battery/power train warranty of 8 years/160k.

I’ve read about $750 door handle actuator repairs on tesla 3’s.. $4000 heat pumps.. and on here there are multiple threads about people having to get heater or hvac repaired/replaced within weeks of ownership.. hopefully those defective units all get weeded out in those first 100,000km because those would be several thousand dollar repair jobs out of warranty.

Where I live base model 3 is 65,500 after taxes minus credits. Ioniq 5 long range rwd is $50,000, plus $3,000 for extended warranty and you’re still $12,500 cheaper than the 3.

The ioniq long range rwd has a range of 484km on a 77.4kw battery, the tesla 404km on a 60kw, but I expect them to be the same real world simply because the tesla has less drag and better battery management.

Navigation, infotainment, etc the tesla is definitely superior va the stock Hyundai, but i don’t care so much because ioniq has CarPlay which is definitely better for me than teslas system so the hassle of plugging my phone is worth it.

Tesla has superchargers, which is huge for someone who doesn’t charge at home or does a lot of road trips. But I would charge at home 360/365 days a year so I don’t let that sway me too much.

Space.. the ioniq is more airy, but I think the tesla has just as much storage space when you could the space under the trunk and the much bigger frunk.

Tesla can lock in price and financing today and get the car in less than 6 months.. Hyundai order today and get the car probably in 18 months, and hopefully price doesn't increase too much for the 2023 model...

Ioniq has more leg room in the rear, and the seats have adjustable reclining unlike the 3, but i definitely prefer the closed in feeling you get on the 3 vs the ioniq which has things open between the two front seats like you're in an old school pickup truck.

It's crazy to me that you could get the Tesla for less than the Ioniq, I'm not sure I would buy the Ioniq if they were the same price. Hard to say.
 

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2020 model 38kw Ioniq electric
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If you travel long distances Tesla with its charging network wins hands down. If however you are always going to charge at home I think the best thing to do is see which one you prefer to drive. My Hyundai is 2 years old now and done well over 100 000km with absolutely no battery degradation, I cannot however vouch for the more environmentally friendly Tesla batteries.
 

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This times a million.

I tried a pure DC charging lifestyle since I bought an ID.4 first with 3 years free charging... after a few weeks, I never wanted to visit another DC charger again. Imagine NOT having a shower or bathroom at home and having to use public toilets and gyms.
You mean like every ICE vehicle ever? Come on people, using the charging network is no different than what we‘ve all always done with cars: go to a service station to fill up. At least with a DCFC you don’t get spilled fuel on your hands. Now the big EV difference is charging at home overnight…I get that…and it is a very big plus for EVs. But for those living where home-charging is a challenge or impossible like apartments for example, using the “service station” approach is not wholly catastrophic.
 
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