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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm debating an Ioniq 5 and a Tesla 3 standard range. I would almost never go more than 150km between home charges except for possibly a half dozen road trips a year which would be in the summer when fast charging should work well, unlike the winter. The tesla would cost $10,000 more but would probably have $10,000 better resale value in 5-6 years because of the brand.

I read about problems on here, slow charging under in the winter, draining 12v batteries, climate control that doesn't work properly, scheduled departure heating not working, overnight scheduled charging not working, lack of rear wiper, etc.. and I'm wondering if these are outliers. Then again I'm not on a Tesla forum to see how many people are having issues with their new cars over there..

The model 3 standard range is a little bit less than the Ioniq 5 RWD long range, but i imagine at real world speeds (not 90km/h), the Tesla probably comes out on top because of it's more aerodynamic profile.

So to those who own both, how do they compare? Which did you enjoy more? If you could only own one, which would it be?

I contacted a couple of people selling used tesla's on facebook, and it seems many of them had a lot of repairs (suspension, etc) in their first 4-5 years of ownership, and many complained about the quality of service, and difficult getting quick service. But reading this forum, that seems to be an issue with the Ioniq 5 as well.. no parts, dealers who can't diagnose issues, and don't know how to fix these cars.

Anyways, I'm used to Toyota camry levels of reliability, so I know it won't be like that for either of these cars, but just trying to get a better idea of what I'm getting into so I don't have any regrets :)
 

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I'm debating an Ioniq 5 and a Tesla 3 standard range. I never go more than 150km between chargers except for possibly a half dozen road trips a year which would be in the summer when fast charging should work well, unlike the winter. The tesla would cost $10,000 more but would probably have $10,000 better resale value in 5-6 years because of the brand.

I read about problems on here, slow charging under in the winter, draining 12v batteries, climate control that doesn't work properly, scheduled departure heating not working, overnight scheduled charging not working, lack of rear wiper, etc.. and I'm wondering if these are outliers. Then again I'm not on a Tesla forum to see how many people are having issues with their new cars over there..

The model 3 standard range is a little bit less than the Ioniq 5 RWD long range, but i imagine at real world speeds (not 90km/h), the Tesla probably comes out on top because of it's more aerodynamic profile.

So to those who own both, how do they compare? Which did you enjoy more? If you could only own one, which would it be?

I contacted a couple of people selling used tesla's on facebook, and it seems many of them had a lot of repairs (suspension, etc) in their first 4-5 years of ownership, and many complained about the quality of service, and difficult getting quick service. But reading this forum, that seems to be an issue with the Ioniq 5 as well.. no parts, dealers who can't diagnose issues, and don't know how to fix these cars.

Anyways, I'm used to Toyota camry levels of reliability, so I know it won't be like that for either of these cars, but just trying to get a better idea of what I'm getting into so I don't have any regrets :)
It has been discussed a lot here:
Hyundai Ioniq 5 vs Tesla Model Y
 

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The tesla would cost $10,000 more but would probably have $10,000 better resale value in 5-6 years because of the brand.

Possibly, possibly not. There is no 5-6 year experience with Ioniq5’s so hard to forecast. While indeed a Hyundai, it is also a new car category for them, an EV. No idea how this will play out in resale values. I think you’re right in that Tesla might have higher resale, but the $10,000 difference is questionable and a total unknown at this point.

I read about problems on here, slow charging under in the winter, draining 12v batteries, climate control that doesn't work properly, scheduled departure heating not working, overnight scheduled charging not working, lack of rear wiper, etc.. and I'm wondering if these are outliers. Then again I'm not on a Tesla forum to see how many people are having issues with their new cars over there..

My take is that the problems you note are growing pains and Hyundai will resolve them since they seem to be software issues. But the lack of a rear wiper is real and not likely for Hyundai to retrofit but may add in future models.

The model 3 standard range is a little bit less than the Ioniq 5 RWD long range, but i imagine at real world speeds (not 90km/h), the Tesla probably comes out on top because of it's more aerodynamic profile.

I suggest a better approach is to figure your travel range needs for however you plan to use the car. If this is the daily driver, what are your commute distances, running errands, dining out, ferrying kids, etc. I expect both cars could meet your needs and the slight range difference may not be a factor for you at all. Road trips, however, pit Tesla’s amazing Supercharger network against the not-quite-comparable-but-improving non-Supercharger networks. Today the Tesla has the advantage, but that’s today. And do you even plan on road-tripping in one of these at all, rent a trip vehicle, or use another vehicle you have? Lots of options.

So to those who own both, how do they compare? Which did you enjoy more? If you could only own one, which would it be?

Waiting for an Ioniq5, owned my Model 3 RWD LR since 07/2018. The Tesla has met ALL my driving needs, local and trips, with no difficulty at all. I expect my Ioniq5, whenever the heck it may arrive, will do the same and be a great replacement for my very-limited-range 2012 Nissan LEAF SL. If I were in your situation with both vehicles being available, I’d pick the Ioniq5 for its similar “goodness” and lower cost through the current tax credit, which I will be able to fully use. YMMV, of course.

I contacted a couple of people selling used tesla's on facebook, and it seems many of them had a lot of repairs (suspension, etc) in their first 4-5 years of ownership, and many complained about the quality of service, and difficult getting quick service. But reading this forum, that seems to be an issue with the Ioniq 5 as well.. no parts, dealers who can't diagnose issues, and don't know how to fix these cars.

Since this is Hyundai’s first real foray into EVs, I’m sure there will be growing pains. But given the excitement around the vehicle and demand for them, I sincerely feel Hyundai will step up to the plate. This is analogous to the situation with Nissan when they delivered the LEAF in late 2011-2012. Dealerships had a huge and expensive training curve to climb, both in their sales and service departments. Today is a bit different though as that learning curve is well known and multiple big players are going or have already gone through it. Frankly, I don’t see that Hyundai or any new EV provider has a choice in the matter.

As to Tesla, yes, there have been issues with forums detailing these. One datapoint from my experience: I’ve had exactly no issues with support whatever. I can schedule service easily, quickly, and most often it will be performed in my driveway by their mobile service units. I’ve also had no suspension issues, a computer upgrade that was included in my original purchase of FSD, one tire rotation at no cost, and two sets of cabin air filters replaced. That’s it. I think my experience is more common for owners than the far less frequent issues in the forums, but I could just be very lucky. Doubt it though.


Anyways, I'm used to Toyota camry levels of reliability, so I know it won't be like that for either of these cars, but just trying to get a better idea of what I'm getting into so I don't have any regrets :)

You’ll likely find things you don’t like, just as with pretty much any car you buy. Take your needs, your money, and add in your affordable wants. Then go for it.
I embedded my replies in your post…click to expand.
 

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I personally do not own model 3 or ioniq 5 as of right now, but I had intensive research done on both. Here's what my findings are according to the tesla forum and what I have known about hyundai by owning a Kona EV

1. Tesla gas much more issue with overall build quality and having a panel gaps, I seen few post in tesla forum that even cameras were broken at the time of delivery, so that gives +1 to hyundsi as there build quality is definitely superior in comparison to tesla.

2. Overall access to the dealership and warranties, both company offers excellent warranties but if you were to find hyundai service department it would be much more easier than tesla hence hyundai +1

3. Supercharger network is tesla selling point if you live where there is an abundance of the supercharging network, while hyundai relies on DC chargers which are increasing in number, but as of now that takes tesla to up the notch, hence tesla +1

4. Tesla costs much more than that of equivalent ioniq 5, hyundai +1

5. Resale value is superior for tesla, tesla +1

6. Technology is somewhat superior in tesla in every way but ioniq 5 offers technology rhat tesla doesn't like head up display, ventilated seats, 360 degree cameras, that's a tie for me for both

7. What I read in tesla group with LFP battery in standard RWD range model that it does not charge in full capacity in winter below 0 degree, I have owned kona ev for 2 years and it's battery management system is 99% reliable keeping battery warm so I give that to hyundai +1

8. Customer service, while tesla has lots of online resources and software updates, it fails 90% of the time in customer service, hyundai on the other hand does not have that much problem with customer service when it comes to actual car service, so I give that to hyundsi +1.

9. Trade in value and vehicle buying bargain, this definitely goes to hyundai as they offer good trade in value and will adjust price at dealer level, if you know how. So +1 for hyundai.

So for me it was hyundai +7 against tesla +3, I had pre order of both and I have delivery Date for both but I'm taking delivery of ioniq 5 and canceling tesla M3. Hope this helps.

This is just my opinion so others MMV.
 

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I have both Ioniq 5 and Tesla model 3 Long range.

I have another thread called slow charging on this site which is my experience of Ioniq 5 charging. I realise that my experience is not the same as everyone’s but I’ll be honest - as much as I love the Ioniq 5 style, comfort, etc. I really regret having bought it due to the issues I have had and the lack of support or interest from Hyundai.

That’s of course only my opinion and this Tesla does have some down sides - it’s a little noisier and perhaps a little harder riding. If my I5 charged properly I would 100% recommend it, but sadly it doesn’t and the company service is poor (not the dealer incidentally).

I don’t think you be disappointed by the model 3.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have both Ioniq 5 and Tesla model 3 Long range.

I have another thread called slow charging on this site which is my experience of Ioniq 5 charging. I realise that my experience is not the same as everyone’s but I’ll be honest - as much as I love the Ioniq 5 style, comfort, etc. I really regret having bought it due to the issues I have had and the lack of support or interest from Hyundai.

That’s of course only my opinion and this Tesla does have some down sides - it’s a little noisier and perhaps a little harder riding. If my I5 charged properly I would 100% recommend it, but sadly it doesn’t and the company service is poor (not the dealer incidentally).

I don’t think you be disappointed by the model 3.
I read your thread and it was one that got me worried :) It is concerning, not so much the slow charging issue for me personally as I would only use a public charger at most 5 or 6 days a year, but moreso the fact that you're not getting your issue resolved.. and that there are other issues that could arise that might affect me more significantly, that Hyundai can't fix or chooses to ignore. I'm in Canada, so I don't know if it's different here in terms of the corporate structure, I know here the dealerships all fall under the Hyundai Canada corporate umbrella which is why no dealership charges over MSRP unlike in the US where they're all independent and it's a bit of the wild wild west. Is the UK structure more similar to Canada or the US?
 

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I have 2 Tesla 3 and Ioniq 5 in the family. You will not be disappointed with Tesla at all, plus the software updates are incredible.... No issues for charging on a road trip

For the Ioniq 5, there are a few features, that I do love a lot, that Tesla doesn't have.

I am happy with both vehicles.
 

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I personally do not own model 3 or ioniq 5 as of right now, but I had intensive research done on both. Here's what my findings are according to the tesla forum and what I have known about hyundai by owning a Kona EV

1. Tesla gas much more issue with overall build quality and having a panel gaps, I seen few post in tesla forum that even cameras were broken at the time of delivery, so that gives +1 to hyundsi as there build quality is definitely superior in comparison to tesla.

2. Overall access to the dealership and warranties, both company offers excellent warranties but if you were to find hyundai service department it would be much more easier than tesla hence hyundai +1

3. Supercharger network is tesla selling point if you live where there is an abundance of the supercharging network, while hyundai relies on DC chargers which are increasing in number, but as of now that takes tesla to up the notch, hence tesla +1

4. Tesla costs much more than that of equivalent ioniq 5, hyundai +1

5. Resale value is superior for tesla, tesla +1

6. Technology is somewhat superior in tesla in every way but ioniq 5 offers technology rhat tesla doesn't like head up display, ventilated seats, 360 degree cameras, that's a tie for me for both

7. What I read in tesla group with LFP battery in standard RWD range model that it does not charge in full capacity in winter below 0 degree, I have owned kona ev for 2 years and it's battery management system is 99% reliable keeping battery warm so I give that to hyundai +1

8. Customer service, while tesla has lots of online resources and software updates, it fails 90% of the time in customer service, hyundai on the other hand does not have that much problem with customer service when it comes to actual car service, so I give that to hyundsi +1.

9. Trade in value and vehicle buying bargain, this definitely goes to hyundai as they offer good trade in value and will adjust price at dealer level, if you know how. So +1 for hyundai.

So for me it was hyundai +7 against tesla +3, I had pre order of both and I have delivery Date for both but I'm taking delivery of ioniq 5 and canceling tesla M3. Hope this helps.

This is just my opinion so others MMV.
#1 is no longer an issue. Newly 2022 model has much better build quality. Most of the issues you've read are in the past.
#7 Tesla has one of the best battery tech, and we charged ours below 0 degrees all the time. Also if you are in cold area with temperature constantly dip below 0 you probably shouldn't be driving standard RWD anyway.
#9 Not sure if this is an issue where you can get much higher value from Carvana, Vroom or CarMax.
 

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I've owned a Model 3 Performance, and just bought Ioniq 5 Limited (paid $1k under MSRP fwiw). My quick take on the two with only 100 miles on the Ioniq 5:

Tesla Model 3 P:
  • Obviously much sportier
  • Charger network isn't even close - Tesla is much easier to deal with
  • Mobile apps significantly better - 'they just work' digital first experience. All intuitive
  • UI is much better (maps, screen responsivenss, ease of setup etc)
  • More personality (apps, interactions etc)
  • Integrated buying / driving / charging experience
  • Dealer experience is customer centric, no typical dealer hassles. Turnkey.
Ioniq 5 Limited:
  • Better looking / more unique (Subjective obviously). Turns way more heads if that's your thing.
  • Rock-solid - no creaks, etc. Build quality and interior are a solid click or two above Tesla
  • Ride quality - obviously more softly sprung, but feels much less crashy than M3P for sure... but also think better than Model Y I've ridden in
  • Interior - Obviously it's a bigger car, but feels like doesnt use its storage as thougtfully as it kid for the space you have. Super light and airy tho - lot of compliments on it so far
  • Cruise / Lane keep - I've always found the Hyundai setup to be more intuitive, easier to sorta mindlessly turn on and easy to anticipate what it's going to do. Tesla surprised me every now and then
  • Charging - For some reason the Level 1 charger that it comes with is only trickling a charge in (probably 1/3 the rate of the Tesla Level 1). Tesla was totally serviceable for my limited driving with Level 1 and the occasional supercharge stop. Hyundai I've already ordered an alternate Level 1 to test, and Level 2 to extension cord in.
  • Mobile App Ecosystem feels cobbled together - Chargepoint, Electrify America, Hyundai Blue something... . Hyundai apps are a joke - bluelink is currently down, slow to sync... you can do them but they're annoying
  • UI - Not intuitive on some things - eg couldnt figure out smart park without opening the manual etc.
  • Dealers - by far the worst part of the experience. Markups, 'why dont you come in and talk about it...', and then dealer environment is very variable - some Hyundai stores are nice, some are a cluster. Having bought from most brands and been raised in a car dealership, the jokers working / owning Hyundai (and unfortunately Genesis) dealers are some of the worst
  • Charging network - I haven't tried yet, but a quick look where I am (CT) says they're pretty shaky - 1-2 electrify america slots spread out in weird spots (walmart parking lots etc)
I ultimately decided to give the Hyundai a whirl given the tax credit and the fact it was new and different, and would just try it till Rivian arrives. So far, all in all, I'd say - no regrets and still getting to know it... Will probably keep it for a bit and then go upmarket again. Really dont want to deal with the dealers more if service etc comes up. Realize a ramble. 🤷‍♂️
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
#1 is no longer an issue. Newly 2022 model has much better build quality. Most of the issues you've read are in the past.
#7 Tesla has one of the best battery tech, and we charged ours below 0 degrees all the time. Also if you are in cold area with temperature constantly dip below 0 you probably shouldn't be driving standard RWD anyway.
#9 Not sure if this is an issue where you can get much higher value from Carvana, Vroom or CarMax.
I was under the impression RWD
I've owned a Model 3 Performance, and just bought Ioniq 5 Limited (paid $1k under MSRP fwiw). My quick take on the two with only 100 miles on the Ioniq 5:

Tesla Model 3 P:
  • Obviously much sportier
  • Charger network isn't even close - Tesla is much easier to deal with
  • Mobile apps significantly better - 'they just work' digital first experience. All intuitive
  • UI is much better (maps, screen responsivenss, ease of setup etc)
  • More personality (apps, interactions etc)
  • Integrated buying / driving / charging experience
  • Dealer experience is customer centric, no typical dealer hassles. Turnkey.
Ioniq 5 Limited:
  • Better looking / more unique (Subjective obviously). Turns way more heads if that's your thing.
  • Rock-solid - no creaks, etc. Build quality and interior are a solid click or two above Tesla
  • Ride quality - obviously more softly sprung, but feels much less crashy than M3P for sure... but also think better than Model Y I've ridden in
  • Interior - Obviously it's a bigger car, but feels like doesnt use its storage as thougtfully as it kid for the space you have. Super light and airy tho - lot of compliments on it so far
  • Cruise / Lane keep - I've always found the Hyundai setup to be more intuitive, easier to sorta mindlessly turn on and easy to anticipate what it's going to do. Tesla surprised me every now and then
  • Charging - For some reason the Level 1 charger that it comes with is only trickling a charge in (probably 1/3 the rate of the Tesla Level 1). Tesla was totally serviceable for my limited driving with Level 1 and the occasional supercharge stop. Hyundai I've already ordered an alternate Level 1 to test, and Level 2 to extension cord in.
  • Mobile App Ecosystem feels cobbled together - Chargepoint, Electrify America, Hyundai Blue something... . Hyundai apps are a joke - bluelink is currently down, slow to sync... you can do them but they're annoying
  • UI - Not intuitive on some things - eg couldnt figure out smart park without opening the manual etc.
  • Dealers - by far the worst part of the experience. Markups, 'why dont you come in and talk about it...', and then dealer environment is very variable - some Hyundai stores are nice, some are a cluster. Having bought from most brands and been raised in a car dealership, the jokers working / owning Hyundai (and unfortunately Genesis) dealers are some of the worst
  • Charging network - I haven't tried yet, but a quick look where I am (CT) says they're pretty shaky - 1-2 electrify america slots spread out in weird spots (walmart parking lots etc)
I ultimately decided to give the Hyundai a whirl given the tax credit and the fact it was new and different, and would just try it till Rivian arrives. So far, all in all, I'd say - no regrets and still getting to know it... Will probably keep it for a bit and then go upmarket again. Really dont want to deal with the dealers more if service etc comes up. Realize a ramble. 🤷‍♂️
I love all these long detailed replies, and I'm sure they're quite helpful to others that will be having the same debate as me :) So have you sold your model 3? How long did you own it? Did you have many repairs over the time you had it? What was that experience like, getting things fixed, etc? I'm the kind of person that keeps cars for 10 years but i feel like with EV's, that's not going to be a good way to do things. I figure 5 years tops, and that warranties run out on these cars, they'll become expensive to maintain like german ICE vehicles. One downside for Tesla is the warranty is only 4 years/80,000km, that means just under 3 years for me vs 5 years Hyundai.

I definitely loved the infotainment center on the Tesla's I test drove, screen is as responsive as my iphone, uses google maps for nav which is what i use everyday on my iphone. I imagine the app works really well for when you want to warm up the car or cool it off before going somewhere. I like that there's no fob in my pocket, it just unlocks/locks with my phone. But I'm not crazy about everything being in a menu.. opening trunk, frunk, climate control, radio, etc.. but maybe you get used to it. Same with no speedometer in front of me..

But the apple carplay seems to work pretty well in the Ioniq, but have to plug in phone each time so that's a bit of a pain.

Tesla clearly has better trip planning, mapping your route with Superchargers, knowing when you should stop, how much you should charge, preheating your battery before you arrive.. also the best network. But hopefully that's a short term thing as other companies build out more 350kw chargers, and/or Tesla opens up to other EV's. I also don't see myself needing to charge on the road more than a handful of days a year so it's not a terribly important factor for me.

I keep reading about panel gaps and stuff on the Tesla, I don't really care about stuff like that.. though when I read about leaking glass roofs, that's not cool :)
 

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I read your thread and it was one that got me worried :) It is concerning, not so much the slow charging issue for me personally as I would only use a public charger at most 5 or 6 days a year, but moreso the fact that you're not getting your issue resolved.. and that there are other issues that could arise that might affect me more significantly, that Hyundai can't fix or chooses to ignore. I'm in Canada, so I don't know if it's different here in terms of the corporate structure, I know here the dealerships all fall under the Hyundai Canada corporate umbrella which is why no dealership charges over MSRP unlike in the US where they're all independent and it's a bit of the wild wild west. Is the UK structure more similar to Canada or the US?
I was told today by Hyundai that all of the dealers are independent - so I’m not really sure if that means we’re more like the US.

I have to say if rapid charge is not an issue the you will like the car. I really do like it which is why I am so annoyed that I am getting short shift from Hyundai uk. I would have bought another one - but the attitude and service level really does put me off.

Unfortunately we do 300 mile trip twice a week and have to use fast chargers to get a top up for the journey - particularly as just now the range is around 200 miles per full charge. As the summer comes in (for what that’s worth in Scotland) I reckon I will see better range and charging speeds - but I don’t just expect 4 months of that kind of usage.

Anyhoo - I am still convinced that I am unlucky with my car and it’s charging speed and on that basis I am sure you would enjoy both I5 and Tesla.
 

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#1 is no longer an issue. Newly 2022 model has much better build quality. Most of the issues you've read are in the past.
#7 Tesla has one of the best battery tech, and we charged ours below 0 degrees all the time. Also if you are in cold area with temperature constantly dip below 0 you probably shouldn't be driving standard RWD anyway.
#9 Not sure if this is an issue where you can get much higher value from Carvana, Vroom or CarMax.
I do not have a firs hand experience about build quality but what I read from the tesla forum rhat recent delivery that showed up with broken camera and visibly open roof says that they do not quality inspect their vehicle. I mean I love tesla and they definitely have improved their build quality but when a customer pays close to 60 grand for a vehicle, these thing shouldn't be happening at all. Again nothing against tesla but they definitely need better quality inspection for the cars. If it wasn't for people experiencing this quality control issue, customer would be more prone to buying them, and it seems this problem is for North American customers mainly and not as much for the other market.
 

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showed up with broken camera
I can tell you that’s extremely rare, but in any case you can 1) inspect the car for as long as you want prior to delivery and can reject it for any reason, or 2) ask Tesla to fix it post delivery. I agree wholeheartedly with you that when a customer paying 60k for a car it should be near perfect, or at least within specs. But I just want to point out like any brand you most likely to only read about ones that had problem online, when things are going well people don’t bother to post. This applies to any car forum, just like some Ioniq 5 have issues reported here. Our extended families took deliveries of 3 Model Y recently and all of them have been perfect in terms of build quality. Were there bad builds out there? I’m sure, but it’s a good sign that Tesla is getting better and better at manufacturing. Anyway, I just want to point this out because I don’t think you should let build quality, which 1) IMO largely an issue in the past and 2) can be avoided by not taking delivery or fixed by Tesla, as main reason to avoid Tesla.
 

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I can tell you that’s extremely rare, but in any case you can 1) inspect the car for as long as you want prior to delivery and can reject it for any reason, or 2) ask Tesla to fix it post delivery. I agree wholeheartedly with you that when a customer paying 60k for a car it should be near perfect, or at least within specs. But I just want to point out like any brand you most likely to only read about ones that had problem online, when things are going well people don’t bother to post. This applies to any car forum, just like some Ioniq 5 have issues reported here. Our extended families took deliveries of 3 Model Y recently and all of them have been perfect in terms of build quality. Were there bad builds out there? I’m sure, but it’s a good sign that Tesla is getting better and better at manufacturing. Anyway, I just want to point this out because I don’t think you should let build quality, which 1) IMO largely an issue in the past and 2) can be avoided by not taking delivery or fixed by Tesla, as main reason to avoid Tesla.
Yeah definitely they have improved their builds but they need to work on their quality control for sure especially when you wait close to 6 months for delivery.

Overall both company has their strengths and weaknesses, at the end of the day its your personal preference.

For me, ioniq 5 stood out as more comfort, superior build quality, ease of service at my dealership (I live in province where we do not have tesla dealership and service center is 300kms away) and better trade in value.
 

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I can tell you that’s extremely rare, but in any case you can 1) inspect the car for as long as you want prior to delivery and can reject it for any reason, or 2) ask Tesla to fix it post delivery.
From the two Tesla-specific forums I keep up with there indeed have been car deliveries where the new owner has been disappointed with issues to deal with immediately. No one buying any car wants to deal with that. Just a data point though: my 2018 Model 3 was delivered to me in what I would call perfect condition. My car displayed none of the fit or finish issues found in the blogs, no mechanical or electrical or electronic problems, everything that was supposed to work at the time with the then-current version of firmware worked as it was supposed to. And the only thing I’ve had done to the car since delivery are tire rotations and cabin air filter changes. Even the wiper blades are still good. From speaking with others at Supercharger stops, my experience with no issues is the prevailing situation, not the problem cars. I admit that is not a valid statistical sampling, but I’m pleased.

I think there’s also a level of expectation getting in the way here. For many of us, a Tesla approaching US$60,000 is the most expensive vehicle we’ve ever had. Coming from, say, $40,000 or less ICE vehicles, that’s a huge jump and higher expectations come with it, some of which may be unrealistic or in any case just not met by a manufacturer who only has a decade, not a century, of car building experience, and high-volume building only for a few years. And most vehicles today have nowhere near the fit and finish of comparably-priced Audi’s or Mercedes to which Teslas are frequently and unfavorably compared. That doesn’t mean a $60k car can be shabby or broken or not working in any way, just that it will not be equivalent to an Audi unless, well, it is an Audi. Just a thought, could be totally off base here.

All that said, there are many, many reasons I love my Model 3 and only a few downsides for me. If and when it’s delivered, I EXPECT to feel the same about my Ioniq5. After a lot of reading and a test drive, I already know many, many things I EXPECT to like about the car, and a few I don’t. Nonetheless, we are EXPECTING it to be a wonderful replacement for our 2012 Nissan LEAF.
 

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So I had a 2021 Model S (pre-refresh), that was my absolute dream car. There was a lot I loved about that car (so fast. so, so fast), which I have detailed in other posts, but it was in the shop every six weeks without fail. Big things, little things. Some not Tesla's fault (rock cracked the windshield, ran over a nail...had to replace the whole tire though, not just a patch). Mobile service handled or tried to handle two or three of the things, including the initial fit and finish complaints noted when I picked up the car. I looked into Lemon Law, but because the complaints were different items, we didn't qualify. The final straw was leaving the service center for an irrelevant frunk latch recall check and the car completely dying at the stoplight of a major intersection two blocks from the service center. I got to chat with a nice police officer, I got (another) flatbed tow, and I got to waste an afternoon for which I had other things planned. After a heart-to-heart the service manager told me that my car was "about average" in repair frequency. I drove the car after the repair for another week and I was so damn tense any time I heard a noise or the sound glitched, I was done. I had it 15 months.

It was unreliable, and that is why I got rid of my 2007 Volvo for it in the first place!

I love Tesla. I appreciate what Elon Musk has done to change the world's appreciation of EV's. I am in no way a Tesla basher and I will never go back to an ICE vehicle. My sister has owned two Tesla's with no problems. I actually strongly considered a Y for the S replacement, but it was ten months and I didn't want to wait that long. Also, the reason I got the S in the first place is I didn't like that one central screen and preferred the "normal" layout.

I have had my I5 Limited for a month now. I love the car. I have not been to the shop. (I had the tire vibration on the first drive, but it resolved). It has a lot of bells and whistles that my Tesla did not have. I enjoy driving it very much.

Good luck with your choice! The Tesla charging network is second to none!
 

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Horror stories abound with all EVs - I've heard my share with the ID.4 and Mach-E. I owned both. I had ZERO issues with the Mach-E and dozens of issues with the ID.4 - including electrically shutting down in the middle of the road on day 5. Yay! That car was a glitchy mess.

I don't think you can go wrong with either choice. They aren't the same because the Model 3 is a sedan with less usable rear cargo space. The big selling point of the Tesla is the Supercharger network which is meaningless in places like CA where charging is everywhere - but in Florida it is a must. I'm buying a Mach-E GTPE or EV6 or Ioniq 5 as a secondary car - not primary. Primary is a RAV4 Prime with my current secondary car being a Model Y. Ioniq 5 with a heatpump will be a great choice in Canada. Don't settle for an EV without.

If you want Toyota reliability - get a RAV4 Prime. I can't rave about it enough. So few problems reported. Everything just works and it's wickedly fast with 302hp. Faster than the slooooow Ioniq 5 RWD (AWD is Model Y fast though!). Drives like an EV in EV mode (close to an ID.4) and gets 38mpg.
 

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Horror stories abound with all EVs - I've heard my share with the ID.4 and Mach-E. I owned both. I had ZERO issues with the Mach-E and dozens of issues with the ID.4 - including electrically shutting down in the middle of the road on day 5. Yay! That car was a glitchy mess.

I don't think you can go wrong with either choice. They aren't the same because the Model 3 is a sedan with less usable rear cargo space. The big selling point of the Tesla is the Supercharger network which is meaningless in places like CA where charging is everywhere - but in Florida it is a must. I'm buying a Mach-E GTPE or EV6 or Ioniq 5 as a secondary car - not primary. Primary is a RAV4 Prime with my current secondary car being a Model Y. Ioniq 5 with a heatpump will be a great choice in Canada. Don't settle for an EV without.

If you want Toyota reliability - get a RAV4 Prime. I can't rave about it enough. So few problems reported. Everything just works and it's wickedly fast with 302hp. Faster than the slooooow Ioniq 5 RWD (AWD is Model Y fast though!). Drives like an EV in EV mode (close to an ID.4) and gets 38mpg.
A 7.4 sec. From 0 to 60 is slooow...:unsure:.
 

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Horror stories abound with all EVs - I've heard my share with the ID.4 and Mach-E. I owned both. I had ZERO issues with the Mach-E and dozens of issues with the ID.4 - including electrically shutting down in the middle of the road on day 5. Yay! That car was a glitchy mess.

I don't think you can go wrong with either choice. They aren't the same because the Model 3 is a sedan with less usable rear cargo space. The big selling point of the Tesla is the Supercharger network which is meaningless in places like CA where charging is everywhere - but in Florida it is a must. I'm buying a Mach-E GTPE or EV6 or Ioniq 5 as a secondary car - not primary. Primary is a RAV4 Prime with my current secondary car being a Model Y. Ioniq 5 with a heatpump will be a great choice in Canada. Don't settle for an EV without.

If you want Toyota reliability - get a RAV4 Prime. I can't rave about it enough. So few problems reported. Everything just works and it's wickedly fast with 302hp. Faster than the slooooow Ioniq 5 RWD (AWD is Model Y fast though!). Drives like an EV in EV mode (close to an ID.4) and gets 38mpg.
Yeah I really want to get Mach-E as second car, but Ford manufacturing is a hot mess. I placed an order a month ago and i think it will take up to 1 year to get the car! So 2 weeks ago I found a dealer in NJ that will take waitlist at msrp for Ioniq Limited. It's supposed to be here in mid-April, will see how that works out. Also have Model Y Performance on order that't supposed to be delivered in May. Still have some time to think about this which one to go for.
 
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