Hyundai IONIQ Forum banner

Which ACEA specification oil is used in your ioniq?


  • Total voters
    5
21 - 32 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
Even at 7500mi at 50% ICE usage there shouldn't be much debris after the first oil change.
What did the dealer say about you going past the 5000mi recommendation? This is the battle we're fighting in Canada. Hyundai wants us to change oil at 6000km regardless of ICE usage, with the threat of voiding warranty if not followed.
The point isn't about convenience, it's about dumping perfectly good oil unecessarily, which costs us more money and has a negative impact on the environment.
BTW 0W20 oil can only be made using synthetic of some sort so don't let them dupe you into thinking mineral 0W20 is an option.
I didn't tell them anything. This is what Hyundai recommended and Hyundai is the one paying for any repair service. I also bought the extended bumper-to-bumper warranty which covers everything for 10yrs/100K miles with 0 deductible. So as long as I change oil as recommended by the manufacturer, the dealer has a no choice but to repair any engine failure. In the US, consumer right laws are biased towards the consumer. I have challenged many dealers in denying repair claims and has never lost a single case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I didn't tell them anything. This is what Hyundai recommended and Hyundai is the one paying for any repair service. I also bought the extended bumper-to-bumper warranty which covers everything for 10yrs/100K miles with 0 deductible. So as long as I change oil as recommended by the manufacturer, the dealer has a no choice but to repair any engine failure. In the US, consumer right laws are biased towards the consumer. I have challenged many dealers in denying repair claims and has never lost a single case.
I asked what the dealer said because you said they recommend 5000mi but you do the oil change every 7000mi. That's a 40% increase in oil change interval. They're fine with that??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
They said nothing. I told them this is what Hyundai recommends and this is what I am doing. Technically I don't even have to take it to the dealer or use OEM parts but since they offered me a good discount on prepaid service, I let them perform the service. The US has Magnuson-Moss warranty act that prohibits them from denying warranty claim unless they can proof irrefutably that I purposely try to damage the vehicle. This covers not only written portion of the warranty but also implied warranty under the state law.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
You know that your engine is only supposed to last the warranty, right? And the lower the fuel consumption the better. Longer oil life the better,
Yes, C3 is completely overkill for these engines and has no benefits over A5/B5 in this case.

What you're saying about 0W20 is untrue; the high temp viscosities of a 20 vs a 30 oil are not hugely different (not even close to water!). SAE 20 viscosity is 5.6-9.3 cSt, water 0.3 cSt.
If your manual stated to use 0W20 (as it does for us in North America) you would use it, so never say never!
Using 0W30 A5/B5 would be a good option for you at your next service.
What oil change interval do you follow?
The water comparison was purely rhetorical to make a point(oil getting watery at high temps). SAE 20 oils are too thin in my opinion and you are not correct to say 20 and 30 weight oil are not different. Sure viscosity looks within 10-20% difference between the two, but these percentage over the long run will lead to elevated wear.
Why car manufacturers recommend thin oils is understandable. Thin oils will get you lower fuel consumption, and as long as the engine lasts the warranty everything is alright. So elevated wear is OK for them up to a certain point. I've seen my share of engines running economy oils for extended periods of time 20-30 000 km per oil change, and they are completely ruined around the time the warranty is over. I've even seen one get ruined a bit before warranty was over (without being defective, just worn out).
So its a balance. Manufacturers don't want and don't care for engine longevity past the warranty. It has to make the warranty time/mileage and if it breaks right after its over, even better, because you'll buy the newer model. If they can offer lower fuel consumption it only makes their brand/model more appealing over the competition. And which is better for the environment, more frequent oil changes or re/manufacturing engines ... who knows.

And about oil change interval I follow. With the PHEV I really don't know yet. Not enough information available. With my non EV, non Hybrid old cars I had, I did an oil change at 10000km (6000 mi), or 18 months whichever comes first.
PHEV is quite different as in the city I tend to drive it purely on EV mode and the kilometers stack up without the engine even starting. Guess I'll be keeping an eye at the color and smell, try to calculate what is the percentage of EV and engine use. Even if it looks OK it will be changed at 18 months (because of oil oxidation). I'm from those who believe that it is better for the environment to keep the car/engine running longer.

It will be interesting to know your proffered oil change interval?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,308 Posts
Manufacturers don't want and don't care for engine longevity past the warranty.
This is a very cynical view completely unsupported by any evidence. It is impossible to design for failure at a specific mileage, and car life is far exceeding warranty periods across the industry and has been increasing for the last several decades. In fact, cars are sold on reputation for reliability and long life, and to do otherwise (on purpose or because of design defects) means declining sales. This is a very competitive business. Long warranties offered by such companies as Hyundai are intended to overcome sales resistance based on poor reliability in the past.

Synthetic oils, including 0W-20, far outlast and outperform better ordinary oils. They are not specced because they will cause excess engine wear, exactly the opposite. Please link your reports that show other results.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Interesting as this topic is surely the basic rule, if doing your own oil changes, is to use the oil specified in the handbook. From personal experience in UK manufacturers go over service records with a fine toothed comb when faced with a warranty claim where the vehicle has been serviced outside the dealer network. Dealers make good money from servicing and manufacturers seemingly support them by finding trivial faults with independent servicing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
You know that your engine is only supposed to last the warranty, right? And the lower the fuel consumption the better. Longer oil life the better,


The water comparison was purely rhetorical to make a point(oil getting watery at high temps). SAE 20 oils are too thin in my opinion and you are not correct to say 20 and 30 weight oil are not different. Sure viscosity looks within 10-20% difference between the two, but these percentage over the long run will lead to elevated wear.
Why car manufacturers recommend thin oils is understandable. Thin oils will get you lower fuel consumption, and as long as the engine lasts the warranty everything is alright. So elevated wear is OK for them up to a certain point. I've seen my share of engines running economy oils for extended periods of time 20-30 000 km per oil change, and they are completely ruined around the time the warranty is over. I've even seen one get ruined a bit before warranty was over (without being defective, just worn out).
So its a balance. Manufacturers don't want and don't care for engine longevity past the warranty. It has to make the warranty time/mileage and if it breaks right after its over, even better, because you'll buy the newer model. If they can offer lower fuel consumption it only makes their brand/model more appealing over the competition. And which is better for the environment, more frequent oil changes or re/manufacturing engines ... who knows.

And about oil change interval I follow. With the PHEV I really don't know yet. Not enough information available. With my non EV, non Hybrid old cars I had, I did an oil change at 10000km (6000 mi), or 18 months whichever comes first.
PHEV is quite different as in the city I tend to drive it purely on EV mode and the kilometers stack up without the engine even starting. Guess I'll be keeping an eye at the color and smell, try to calculate what is the percentage of EV and engine use. Even if it looks OK it will be changed at 18 months (because of oil oxidation). I'm from those who believe that it is better for the environment to keep the car/engine running longer.

It will be interesting to know your proffered oil change interval?
Are you a conspiracy theorist? How do you "know" OEMs design engines to only last the warranty period? Did you find the special switch that shuts off oil flow at 101 000km?
Do you or have you worked for a vehicle manufacturer? Please tell us which one so nobody ever buys that make again LOL!
Just for your interest, I've worked as a vehicle test engineer for a japanese OEM and technical manager for a specialist lubricant manufacturer.
Lower fuel consumption and longer oil life is better for everyone for sure. Don't know what point you're trying to make with that.
The fact that you think an SAE 20 is "too thin" is meaningless. With that logic you should be using 15W-50 oil. Have you asked yourself why you don't use 15W-50 or even a 5W-40?
Anyway, I will be doing my oil changes at around 6000km as Hyundai recommends for warranty security, but I will also be sending the used oil to a lab for analysis and will share the results on the forum. We can see if the 0W20 has any issues.
By the way the SAE numbers are not weights, they are viscosity grades and I'm sure you will be back telling us just how much you already know about that ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,308 Posts
I'll be interested to see your oil report. I could do my own car at say 20,000 miles, but not sure it is worth the expense.

I recently tested my Honda motorcycle oil at 12,500 miles. I could not find any information on the motorcycle forums about long oil change intervals, especially for one such as mine tuned for high fuel efficiency rather than power. The interesting thing about many motorcycles, including mine, is that engine oil does triple duty as transmission oil and wet clutch medium. So I could not make any inferences from my car oil change history or the available research on cars. For those interested, the testing company, Blackstone, suggested I could extend the OCI longer - recommending trying 15,000 miles and retesting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
So what is the general consensus on a practical and safe oil change interval?
5K, 7K, 9K, 11K miles?

The only reason I picked 7500 miles is that it coincides with tire rotation. You do not want to keep your tires in the same position for more than 8000 miles if you expect them to last. I also hate taking my car in for service so if I can combine as many service schedule as possible, I would gladly do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
This is a very cynical view completely unsupported by any evidence. It is impossible to design for failure at a specific mileage, and car life is far exceeding warranty periods across the industry and has been increasing for the last several decades. In fact, cars are sold on reputation for reliability and long life, and to do otherwise (on purpose or because of design defects) means declining sales. This is a very competitive business. Long warranties offered by such companies as Hyundai are intended to overcome sales resistance based on poor reliability in the past.
And your view is supported by evidence? You've memorized the advertisement brochure very well. You should work as a salesman if you're not already.

Synthetic oils, including 0W-20, far outlast and outperform better ordinary oils. They are not specced because they will cause excess engine wear, exactly the opposite. Please link your reports that show other results.
We're neither discussing or comparing synthetic and ordinary (whatever that means ... semi-synthetic? mineral? synthetic from cheap brand?) oils. Putting 0w-20 among the best performing oils is just plain nonsense. I'd like to see you using 0w-20 on a track day car, and then we'll talk about outlasting and outperforming. Oils are not specified just with wear in mind and saying that just to be in opposition is simplistic thinking. They are specified with engine assembly tolerance, engine type, engine operating parameters (temperature, rpm, engine load etc.), fuel efficiency, engine wear, catalytic converters, engine cleaning, ambient temperature and humidity and a great many more in mind. Some come with priority over others. Is that so hard to comprehend?
At the end of the day my opinion is just an opinion on a public forum, we're not in a courtroom.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Are you a conspiracy theorist? How do you "know" OEMs design engines to only last the warranty period? Did you find the special switch that shuts off oil flow at 101 000km?
Do you or have you worked for a vehicle manufacturer? Please tell us which one so nobody ever buys that make again LOL!
No, I'm an engineer. For the second question don't usually like to repeat myself ... "I've seen my share of engines..." did you read? And no I haven't found such a switch, but I have found engineering design changes that result in shorter engine life. A trade-off for better engine fuel economy, performance, lower emissions, cheaper to produce etc. Don't know what was your point with that... try to smear me maybe?

Just for your interest, I've worked as a vehicle test engineer for a japanese OEM and technical manager for a specialist lubricant manufacturer.
Good for you! But I haven't shown any interest where you've worked before! Just "your preferred oil change interval".

Lower fuel consumption and longer oil life is better for everyone for sure. Don't know what point you're trying to make with that.
Not if it comes at the expense of shorter engine life.

The fact that you think an SAE 20 is "too thin" is meaningless. With that logic you should be using 15W-50 oil. Have you asked yourself why you don't use 15W-50 or even a 5W-40?
You clearly misunderstood me or playing dumb on purpose. Hope its the first one. And I do use 5W-40 for my weekend car. You should know why I put that oil and would never put 0W-20 or 15W-50 in that engine, after all you're the oil guru. And no, I didn't put that oil in because the manual said so(if that even matters for that engine anymore). My logic is that going "too thin" is a trade off. Nothing extreme like you would like to have people believe I said.

Anyway, I will be doing my oil changes at around 6000km as Hyundai recommends for warranty security, but I will also be sending the used oil to a lab for analysis and will share the results on the forum. We can see if the 0W20 has any issues.
Bingo! The only question I had for you. Unfortunately you will only see the oil perspective. You won't see the issues 0W-20 has over 0W-30 by examining the oil. You would by disassembling and examining 2 identical engines, operated and maintained at identical conditions for longer periods of time, using the 2 grades of oil. But you worked as a test engineer/manager, you should know those things!
I bet that at 6000km (who knows how much done on EV) that oil will show to be perfectly capable of doing another 6000km.

By the way the SAE numbers are not weights, they are viscosity grades and I'm sure you will be back telling us just how much you already know about that ;)
Fair enough ... a mistake is a mistake.

I'd like to hear your opinion on that 6000km oil change, preferably not based on warranty reasons. For example what would your oil changes be if there were no warranty? What grade and type of oil you would use and how frequent would you change it? I'd like to hear your insight, after all you worked as a test engineer/manager, what is your experience on the subject.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,308 Posts
And your view is supported by evidence? You've memorized the advertisement brochure very well. You should work as a salesman if you're not already.
Yes, supported by the evidence. I've already asked you to cite your sources. Guess that is not happening. Troll?

What advertisement brochure are you referring to? I doubt I've seen it. I don't own a TV, and have very effective ad blockers on my browsers. Not in sales, and your pitch is pretty bad. Outrageous even.
 
21 - 32 of 32 Posts
Top