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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I am new here and just after advice. I am looking at getting an Ioniq hybrid, premium se. I know there are two different wheel sizes and that it makes some difference on paper to mpg and 0-62. Has anyone got any experience of the 17" wheels? Do they have plastic covers on them like the 15" wheels.? Thanks in advance.

Apologies if this should be in the hybrid thread but I'm new here and wasn't sure which to post too.
 

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moved it to general discussion as the wheel size goes across all the models


I believe the 17" wheels do have covers as well, I think we have some members with 17" wheels or due to have them once they get their cars shortly


I know I looked at the issue of wheels affecting mpg, and other cars do suffer the same effect of larger wheels means lower mpg does exist, but it appears to be less of an effect than in the official economy test suggests
 

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The 15" wheels have 65 profile tyres and the 17" wheels have 45 profile tyres so the 17" are likely to give a firmer ride.
 

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All wheels have some weird plastic covers. That's why I get the 16" from the electric instead of the 17" which come standard with premium in Germany. They will get outfitted with winter tires and I'll look for a set of Enkeis in 7x17 or 8x18, depending on wha will fit without tooling at the arches and what the TÜV says.
 

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I can assure you, size definitely does matter! :D

I heard the 17s ruined the handling so I went with 15s. Anyone got the 17s ? Would be interested in hearing what they're like.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I can assure you, size definitely does matter! :D

I heard the 17s ruined the handling so I went with 15s. Anyone got the 17s ? Would be interested in hearing what they're like.
I went with 17". Car being delivered to dealer this week hopefully as it was offloaded from morning pilot.

I read mixed reviews about size. Some say better handling, more road noise. Some say worse handling, better wet grip. Almost every source says less mpg and slower 0-62.

Having driven high performance cars professionally in a previous role, I wanted the greater water displacement. It is known to persist it down here in the north east and I want safety.

Will update when I can. But it would be great to hear from other users with larger wheels. (Was soooooooo tempted to say larger appendages). How low brow.
 
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I bought a Ioniq trim with compulsory 17'' wheels in January. But I also bought a set of 15'' winter wheels together with the car, so that until today I have been driving the Ioniq only with 15'' wheels.

It's spring next week, and already 20°C outside as I am writing this e-mail :). So I am going to switch to 17'' summer wheels next week. I will be able to compare, and keep you posted with my findings.
 

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Filth.
but do let us know how you get on, with your big or small ones... haha
 

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I went with 17". Car being delivered to dealer this week hopefully as it was offloaded from morning pilot.

I read mixed reviews about size. Some say better handling, more road noise. Some say worse handling, better wet grip. Almost every source says less mpg and slower 0-62.

Having driven high performance cars professionally in a previous role, I wanted the greater water displacement. It is known to persist it down here in the north east and I want safety.

Will update when I can. But it would be great to hear from other users with larger wheels. (Was soooooooo tempted to say larger appendages). How low brow.
We have 17" wheels on the i20...overall its a lovely car to drive but I do think you can have worse grip sometimes with the bigger wheels.

If you want good water displacement personally I would just put some Michelin Cross-Climates on assuming they do them in the Ioniq sizes....I put some on my Focus estate and wow...I originally used Michelin Energy savers and thought I would go Cross Climate for the all year performance expecting them to be slightly worse than the summer tyre, seeing as the Cross Climates are an all season tyre.

What can I say, not only do they grip in the snow but they make the car corner better and feel less wallowing around corners (probably because the CC are XLs) but they are also quieter on the concrete sections of the M25 by a MASSIVE amount. And they carve through deep puddles solidly. Overall I wouldnt use anything else now....until the new car comes with factory fitted tyres :-(
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Interesting comments on cross climate. I am very interested in those if I ever get to replace the tyres on a car. I usually go through cars quicker than tyres.

On a water displacement note. Tyre size is an important factor in the complex equation of aquaplaning.

Whilst not the be all and end all, size matters. If I can add favourably to the equation and reduce the chance of me or my wife aquaplaning, then Ill take it. It's more often wet than dry right now lol. Hence 225/45 v 195/65 for me.

Interesting read on the subject here.

Hydroplaning (Aquaplaning)
 
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I have been so impressed with tht Cross Climates since putting them on and have used Michelin Primacy/Energy savers for years on the Vectra then the Focus because of the wear/economy.

I only put the Cross Climates on at the beginning of this year as I had planned to keep the car a bit longer but havent found a bad thing to say about them vs my previous Michelins so will be a bit disappointed to not have them for some time.....Mind you if the winter got that bad ever again its hardly expensive to swap them on the Ioniq 15" wheels. They are soooo cheap :)
 

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Yeah....even slightly cheaper if you shop around....is why Im not too concerned....if we had a really bad winter I would just swap them out and keep the originals for a later date for the price of them :)
Yes that was the SlowFit link . I wouldn't use them normally , especially with all the little add ons they manage to put on the bill like insurance you didn't request etc :D
 

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Has anyone got any experience of the 17" wheels? Do they have plastic covers on them like the 15" wheels.?
The 17'' rims I have are the ones pictured in the white Ioniq in the header of this webpage. They have partial plastic covers designed to improve aerodynamics and therefore fuel economy.

The 15" rims I have are not covered with any plastic, because I bought them as an accessory to have an additional set of wheels. They are in the picture in the signature of this post.
 

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Interesting comments on cross climate. I am very interested in those if I ever get to replace the tyres on a car. I usually go through cars quicker than tyres.

On a water displacement note. Tyre size is an important factor in the complex equation of aquaplaning.

Whilst not the be all and end all, size matters. If I can add favourably to the equation and reduce the chance of me or my wife aquaplaning, then Ill take it. It's more often wet than dry right now lol. Hence 225/45 v 195/65 for me.

Interesting read on the subject here.

Hydroplaning (Aquaplaning)
My understanding was that to reduce aquaplaning risk, the contact patch should be as long as possible, but also as narrow as possible.
Total diameter of the wheel including tyre, and therefore length of the contact patch are the same with 17'' wheels and 15'' wheels: the lower sidewall of the tyre compensates for the bigger rim.

So 195/65R15 could be less sensitive to aquaplaning than 225/45R17, or am I getting something wrong here?

For example tyre manufacturer Pirelli says:
"wide tyres, such as those of the Pirelli P Zero line, which ensure greater grip in dry conditions, are actually more likely to experience aquaplaning than narrower tyres, because they have to drain off a greater amount of water in order to remain in contact with the tarmac."
Driving Safety & Aquaplaning: the help comes from car races
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
My understanding was that to reduce aquaplaning risk, the contact patch should be as long as possible, but also as narrow as possible.
Total diameter of the wheel including tyre, and therefore length of the contact patch are the same with 17'' wheels and 15'' wheels: the lower sidewall of the tyre compensates for the bigger rim.

So 195/65R15 could be less sensitive to aquaplaning than 225/45R17, or am I getting something wrong here?

For example tyre manufacturer Pirelli says:
"wide tyres, such as those of the Pirelli P Zero line, which ensure greater grip in dry conditions, are actually more likely to experience aquaplaning than narrower tyres, because they have to drain off a greater amount of water in order to remain in contact with the tarmac."
Driving Safety & Aquaplaning: the help comes from car races

Hi.

Answering one thing at a time :)

The contact patch of 225 tyres is larger than 195.

As the article I quoted shows. There are many factors in the aquaplaning equation. So, the reason the Pirelli P zero line (although having wider contact) are worse at displacing water than, say winter 195 tyres, is due to tread pattern. Dry running tyres give more grip in the dry due to greater amount of actual rubber in contact with the road. This is why F1 etc use slick tyres in the dry. You could have a 225 slick tyre and a 195 tread tyre and the 195 would be better in the wet. Put the same tread pattern on the 225 as the 195 and the 225 would be better. The fact is that the tread is what displaces the water, you shift more with more tread. So physics and I agree with the fact Pirelli Zero will be worse in rain than a winter tyre that is narrower.

Pirelli winter tyres have, by design, a very different tread pattern. I am also in total agreement that a narrow tyre is much much better in true winter conditions (snow and slush). This is because the narrow tyre can cut through the snow much more effectively.

Fortunately I don't get snow or slush, so rain is my only concern.
 

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Filth.
but do let us know how you get on, with your big or small ones... haha
So I switched from 15'' winter wheels (Alpin 5) to 17'' summer wheels (Primacy 3) yesterday and after 70 km the outcome is:

As far as wheels are concerned, size enhances pleasure :laugh:

Pleasure of the eyes: the Ioniq looks much better with 17'' wheels IMHO
Pleasure to drive the car: the steering is at once smoother and more precise, the car feels more responsive and "glides" even better. It's great.

Of course I am not comparing apple to apple here. The size is different, but the type of tyre is also very different. Temperature is around 10°C now, and winter tyres are meant for 7°C and below.

Regarding noise, it is a mixed bag, probably because I am not comparing apple to apple. The 15'' winter wheels are noisy at 10°C, whatever the road I am driving on. The 17'' summer wheels are quieter than 15'' winter wheels on a good, typical road, but noisier on a noisy type of road-coating.

Regarding comfort: I like it firm so I prefer 17'' wheels, except on potholes where low profile tyres are a real problem. But that's my personal taste.

Regarding fuel efficiency: It's too early to call, but the better efficiency of summer tyres seems to offset the lesser efficiency of big rims. Fuel efficiency seems stable.
 

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I have Cross Climates on my golf. Needed 4 tyres last year and having moved out in to the sticks, I wanted something a bit better if we have ice and snow. I never scrimp on tyres, as they are the most important thing on the car. Used to Michelin PS3's but actually prefer the cross climates. Quieter, better traction and far more compliant.
 

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I have Cross Climates on my golf. Needed 4 tyres last year and having moved out in to the sticks, I wanted something a bit better if we have ice and snow. I never scrimp on tyres, as they are the most important thing on the car. Used to Michelin PS3's but actually prefer the cross climates. Quieter, better traction and far more compliant.
I agree fully....I had Michelin Energy Savers on my focus, currently replaced the front two with Cross-climates and love them. The tread pattern also shifts water extremely well when you hit deep puddles
 
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