Hyundai IONIQ Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, du to an electricity shortage here, I had to use an inverter to power my refrigerator and lightning into the house. I used my Ioniq EV for this task. The problem is that the voltage kept falling constantly and gradually torought the time I used this setup. In 5 hours of drawing between 90 to 250 watts, the voltage at the 12v battery dropped from 14.2v to a low 11.7v. The inverter was reading at its lowest 11.1v near the automatic low battery cutoff. The car was always ON and everything inside the car OFF. So I was wondering how much power the Ioniq DC to DC charger is able to produce. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
2017 Hyundai IONIQ Electric Premium
Joined
·
791 Posts
Welcome to the forum @Yan,

The max power of the DCDC converter inside the EPCU is 1.8kW. Main fuse is 150A. But I wouldn't push it that far for permanent auxiliary load. Limit to 60-80Amps to prevent overheating and damage.

Did you connect to the 12V battery, or from the main fusebox to the chassis? If the current sensor (on the battery) is in between, power maybe limited by the charging limiter for the auxiliary battery (lowering the system voltage a bit).

Did you have a loose connection or to long a cable causing the voltage drop maybe?

Maybe 1st ask your dealer what's going to happen to your warranty for a setup like this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks for the welcome Patrick. I think you have put the finger on the problem I seem to have. Yes I connected the negative wire of the inverter directly on the battery post. In the rush I didnt take notice that I bypassed the current sensor this way. I will have to retry the setup by taking care of putting the negative to the car chassis. Stay tuned. Also I dont have need over 500w. I prefer to be on the safe side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Hello Yan. I was doing a similar setup to yours - with the 1500kW inverter connected to the DC converter fuse and the negative connected to the battery. After the load of about 1000kW is applied, the 12v battery voltage will hold steady at 14-15v for about 30-40 seconds, and then suddenly begin to drop, so I suspect there is some kind of a protection in my Ioniq electric (2016) DC to DC converter, so that it reduces the power to the 12v battery after a short time after "noticing" an elevated load

Did you possibly have any success of getting your setup to work reliably ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Did anyone test via the body? Does this effect the drop off?
Where the best place to clamp?
Do the Max power and Ampage number apply to the 28 and the 38?

Whats the max load we can get out off the car without draining the 12v?
 

·
Registered
2020 IONIQ Electric Ultimate Iron Grey
Joined
·
9 Posts
This is an older thread, but I was recently trying to find ways to produce power since we had a 18h outage here (in the cold), and came across this thread.

@Patrick do you have any part numbers for the "DCDC converter inside the EPCU"? I see you have a 2017, but I have a 2020.

I was thinking of hooking up a DC-DC charger and using a better external battery and inverter to power some stuff in the house. Slow constant charge from the car to the external battery, and the external battery can take spikes and surges better without doing any potential damage to the EV. Probably get a LiFePO4 battery as the external.

I also bought a clamp meter and was going to test how the 12V battery is being charge, but haven't got around to that yet...

;D
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top