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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi to all. A Vehicle to Home connection sounds like a great idea to complement my home solar, especially while
  • solar feed-in tarriffs are nearly negligible
  • in some areas (in Oz), it is actually proposed to charge solar owners to feed-in (to ensure energy retailers won't lose profits) !!
  • home batteries remain expensive and a break-even on cost over lifetime, at best
  • home batteries have only a fraction of the car's battery capacity (I've read an EV battery could power an average house for 4 days).
and I've already got the battery!
But... the 2020 Ioniq doesn't have the V2H system connection that other makes, e.g. Nissan Leaf, have.
Are there any reliable after-market solutions for the Ioniq?
 

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Hi to all. A Vehicle to Home connection sounds like a great idea to complement my home solar, especially while
  • solar feed-in tarriffs are nearly negligible
  • in some areas (in Oz), it is actually proposed to charge solar owners to feed-in (to ensure energy retailers won't lose profits) !!
  • home batteries remain expensive and a break-even on cost over lifetime, at best
  • home batteries have only a fraction of the car's battery capacity (I've read an EV battery could power an average house for 4 days).
and I've already got the battery!
But... the 2020 Ioniq doesn't have the V2H system connection that other makes, e.g. Nissan Leaf, have.
Are there any reliable after-market solutions for the Ioniq?
That should be investigated since software is already there(UTILITY mode)
I wouldn't be surprised that 2020 Ioniq has it, but its locked or something like that.
 

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Vehicle to Home/Grid requires either:

a) Inversion to AC done in the car, to back-feed onto the mains. This must sync to the grid frequency, and include anti-islanding so that line workers aren't electrocuted when trying to get the lights back on during a blackout. Anti-islanding eliminates the ability of the system to act as backup power.

b) DC connection from the vehicle battery to an offboard inverter. Offboard inversion allows integration with a transfer switch that can disconnect the residence from the grid, allowing it to provide back-up power during a blackout.

Method a) could work without any support from the Type 2 charger, although some may detect that the current is flowing in reverse and disconnect for safety. (Detecting reverse AC current is trickier than detecting reverse DC current, so many Type 2s probably don't monitor for the current polarity.) Regardless, I don't think that any cars attempt to do this, although cars with Vehicle to Load like the Ioniq 5 and EV 6 probably could.

Method b) requires coordination between the vehicle's BMS and the offboard inverter. The Chademo connector has signalling for this, but the protocol to do this on the signal pins of the CCS connector used by the majority of EVs (including the Ioniq and Ioniq 5) is still under development prior to standardization. In some ways, yes, it's just software, as this is an extension of the protocol already in use for DC fast charging. But that software won't exist until the standards are in place to let dissimilar brands of car and inverter talk to one another to accomplish the task.
 

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Vehicle to Home/Grid requires either:

a) Inversion to AC done in the car, to back-feed onto the mains. This must sync to the grid frequency, and include anti-islanding so that line workers aren't electrocuted when trying to get the lights back on during a blackout. Anti-islanding eliminates the ability of the system to act as backup power.

b) DC connection from the vehicle battery to an offboard inverter. Offboard inversion allows integration with a transfer switch that can disconnect the residence from the grid, allowing it to provide back-up power during a blackout.

Method a) could work without any support from the Type 2 charger, although some may detect that the current is flowing in reverse and disconnect for safety. (Detecting reverse AC current is trickier than detecting reverse DC current, so many Type 2s probably don't monitor for the current polarity.) Regardless, I don't think that any cars attempt to do this, although cars with Vehicle to Load like the Ioniq 5 and EV 6 probably could.

Method b) requires coordination between the vehicle's BMS and the offboard inverter. The Chademo connector has signalling for this, but the protocol to do this on the signal pins of the CCS connector used by the majority of EVs (including the Ioniq and Ioniq 5) is still under development prior to standardization. In some ways, yes, it's just software, as this is an extension of the protocol already in use for DC fast charging. But that software won't exist until the standards are in place to let dissimilar brands of car and inverter talk to one another to accomplish the task.
Your option A seems straight forward. But does this means that OBC unit works bi-directionally if desired? Just need to send signal to close the circuit and you will have AC on another end.
 

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Your option A seems straight forward. But does this means that OBC unit works bi-directionally if desired?
No, it doesn't. The Ioniq can't do vehicle to home, I was just speaking theoretically.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Vehicle to Home/Grid requires either:

a) Inversion to AC done in the car, to back-feed onto the mains. This must sync to the grid frequency, and include anti-islanding so that line workers aren't electrocuted when trying to get the lights back on during a blackout. Anti-islanding eliminates the ability of the system to act as backup power.

b) DC connection from the vehicle battery to an offboard inverter. Offboard inversion allows integration with a transfer switch that can disconnect the residence from the grid, allowing it to provide back-up power during a blackout.

Method a) could work without any support from the Type 2 charger, although some may detect that the current is flowing in reverse and disconnect for safety. (Detecting reverse AC current is trickier than detecting reverse DC current, so many Type 2s probably don't monitor for the current polarity.) Regardless, I don't think that any cars attempt to do this, although cars with Vehicle to Load like the Ioniq 5 and EV 6 probably could.

Method b) requires coordination between the vehicle's BMS and the offboard inverter. The Chademo connector has signalling for this, but the protocol to do this on the signal pins of the CCS connector used by the majority of EVs (including the Ioniq and Ioniq 5) is still under development prior to standardization. In some ways, yes, it's just software, as this is an extension of the protocol already in use for DC fast charging. But that software won't exist until the standards are in place to let dissimilar brands of car and inverter talk to one another to accomplish the task.
Many thanks Kevin for explaining the options. Sorry, my electrical literacy enables only a bare understanding; it sounds like 'There are 2 ways its theoretically possible, but more development on standards is needed'.
Do we know how the Leaf does V2H?
 

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Many thanks Kevin for explaining the options. Sorry, my electrical literacy enables only a bare understanding; it sounds like 'There are 2 ways its theoretically possible, but more development on standards is needed'.
Do we know how the Leaf does V2H?
Leaf use ChaDemo which is Bi-directional by design. You can find third part machines from China which enables V2X. And yes, thin line between theory and the other side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This article seems to be a fair summation for V2x in Oz. What are the current vehicle-to-grid options? - and pretty much the same conclusions we've come to in this thread. Probably about 4 years away for the V2x standard for CCS2.
In the author's view, V2x may not become popular since it will require always plugging the car in whenever at home; most people will find this too inconvenient.
He suggests an available option using smart chargers that maximise the use of the solar PV energy and minimise grid power.
 
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