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Hi
We have recently bought an Ioniq Hybrid and I have played about with the sport mode but am uncertain about what can and cannot be done when in this mode. The manual says almost nothing about it other than that using it is likely to increase fuel consumption. I have only ever engaged this once on the move. Can it be used from standstill for e.g.? If by some chance i stalled it when on the move would I find that the gearbox was stuck in a high gear? Does it continue to intelligently use teh battery or is it just using the petrol engine. These may be silly questions but since Hyundai saw fit to include this feature I'd like to be able to make the most of it. Does anyone out there use it? Any experiences, good or bad with the car in this mode?
ATB
Chris
 

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You can shift into sport mode while stopped or moving. I believe it prioritizes the gas engine but will use the traction (electric) motor to supplement performance.
 

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The sport mode is very useful in certain scenarios e.g. when ascending a steep hill, or needing to pull out onto a busy roundabout. Or when you just want to have a bit of fun! Basically, it makes the car a lot more responsive, acceleration-wise.
Yes, you can use it from a standing start. You can still use fully automatic transmission, or you can manually override by shifting up or down. I'm pretty sure that the computer won't let you manually shift into a gear that could damage the engine, and would automatically select 1st if you happened stall.
Finally, EV mode will still be used when appropriate.
Hope that helps.
 

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Sport mode just makes the car a bit more responsive on the accelerator, shifts gears more aggressively on the automatic (keeps low gear longer), change the dashboard display and prioritize performance over economy (cancels ECO mode). This means going pure EV is difficult, if at all possible, but it's still a hybrid, regenerating power and using the electric motor to assist the ICE for performance. It will still operate with automatic gearshifts, but it can then also be shifted manually. When a gear is first selected manually, you cannot go back to auto without cancelling Sport Mode first. You can not shift manually in ECO mode.

I haven't got the impression from this forum that Sport Mode inherently uses more petrol, but it will depend on the actual driving style and speed. But it may be harder to make use of the battery at low speeds (EV).

I use Sport Mode very rarely myself. But when I'm in the mood, and a bit tired of being so correctly fuel economical all the time, and there is an opportunity, I select Sport Mode for a short while. Just for fun and to see and feel the car transform a bit, giving and impression of a sport car.
 

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The sport mode also hardens the steering wheel and braking pedal, which makes it useful in a curvy downhill. On such slopes, I switch to Sport mode once in EV mode, and back to Drive before I resume acceleration and ascent.

But in my experience using sport mode can also be a little bit unsafe if one forgets that even in sport mode the car still has very soft suspension - compared to, say, a VW or Audi. So when taking turns at fairly high speed, the oversteer and pitch are very strong, and wheels may loose traction on wet or dusty asphalt.

Because of its soft suspension, the Ioniq is meant to be driven in a leisurely manner, sport mode or no sport mode.
 

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'17 Marina Blue HEV Ltd I O N I Q since 25 Jul '17
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The other day, I drove for about 8 or 9 minutes in Sport Mode, but I drove economically, that is with a light foot; didn't actually check the Driving Style screen though.

While driving in Sport Mode, while feathering the gas pedal, I did find ICE would shut off sometimes, particularly on downhill stretches. It also seemed like the traction battery charged up a little faster. My fuel economy remained quite consistent at around 4.5 L/100 km (62.8 UK / 52.2 US). Displayed economy a the time was 4.5 and each bar on the Fuel Economy over time chart met, but did not cross the blue 4.5 line across. Ended up with 3 bars over that time representing 7.5 minutes of driving in Sport Mode. Also during that time, I shifted gears manually at their lowest possible speed.

At other times I have used Sport mode for a quick burst of acceleration to get up a hill or pull away from traffic light or junction into traffic. If used correctly, I find no negative impact on my fuel economy represented in that 2.5 minute segment on the graph, in fact, many times it's better than I expected. Sometimes, though, if I've overused it in those same situations, I do see a negative impact on the fuel economy for that 2.5 minute segment.

But, as others have said, Sport Mode does tighten everything up a notch, giving a slightly sporty feel to the car. Can't say I've ever gotten oversteer myself, if anything I notice my Ioniq tends to understeer if I take corners too fast, in either Eco or Sport mode.

Also, as others have mentioned, when you first engage Sport Mode, you're still in full automatic mode, until you either push the shifter up or down. When shifting manually, the car will not allow you to select a higher gear, unless you have the speed to support it. Pushing the shifter up at too low a speed will not change gear. Also, when braking in manual mode, the car will automatically downshift for you as your speed slows. And as @knutsp said, when in manual, the only way to re-engage automatic is to move the shifter back to Eco Mode.

As far as stalling goes, I'm not sure that's really possible in a hybrid, as you've always got the electric motor should the ICE cut out unexpectedly. That said, in a traditional automatic ICE car, if you do stall while in motion, the procedure I was taught was to put the car in Neutral, restart the engine, then shift back in Drive and continue on.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hi Folk
Great replies - really helpful - thanks. On a related issue, i have come to this from a manual gearbox car - is it ok to keep your foot planted when changing up a gear or should you back off for a second to give the clotch (es) a chance?
Chris
 

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is it ok to keep your foot planted when changing up a gear or should you back off for a second to give the clotch (es) a chance?
Keep foot. Automatic double clutch works when torque and power transmission is still fully active, also for manual shifts.
 

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I haven’t tested yet, but in my old Elantra, the shiftronic ? Mode allowed me to put the car in second in the winter to start from a stop in snow and such to help keep the tires from spinning. Does sport mode allow that in the hybrid?
 

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I haven’t tested yet, but in my old Elantra, the shiftronic ? Mode allowed me to put the car in second in the winter to start from a stop in snow and such to help keep the tires from spinning. Does sport mode allow that in the hybrid?
Doubt that. It starts moving in EV mode. It won't spin, because of the electronic anti-spin.
 

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I haven’t tested yet, but in my old Elantra, the shiftronic ? Mode allowed me to put the car in second in the winter to start from a stop in snow and such to help keep the tires from spinning. Does sport mode allow that in the hybrid?
in snow just release the brakes and it will creep gently away with no drama's

light foot on the gas and away you go

no need for 2nd gear at all :)
 

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I haven’t tested yet, but in my old Elantra, the shiftronic ? Mode allowed me to put the car in second in the winter to start from a stop in snow and such to help keep the tires from spinning. Does sport mode allow that in the hybrid?
I experienced black ice with the Ioniq. It starts wonderfully - no spinning at all, even in an uphill start. The electric motor is very smooth in Drive mode.
What wasn't convincing however was the braking part. Braking distance was incredibly long even at very, very low speed, and with winter tires. I got the feeling the ABS was intervening too much and too early.
 

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Electric motors are amazing for traction in bad conditions because they give you **** near full BUT completely controllable torque at 0 RPM. That’s the holy grail of off road driving and normally it comes by revving the engine high but using a slipping clutch to control the wheels. That’s not necessary when the electric motor is being used at very slow speeds.

I park everyday backwards, uphill in a sand pit and the way the front wheels are controlled as I’m backing in and up the hill is magnificent. Incidentally it is much better than my old Better Place Renault EV but mostly because of the way the traction control on the Hyundai seems to be much better suited to the EV. I’m fairly certain that the traction control in the Renault was the same as for the Diesel version and was completely unable to handle the full torque of the EV.
 

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Hi Folk
Great replies - really helpful - thanks. On a related issue, i have come to this from a manual gearbox car - is it ok to keep your foot planted when changing up a gear or should you back off for a second to give the clotch (es) a chance?
Chris
Keep planted. The DCT effectively declutches and clutches for you. If you lift off you will cause a rough change. Smmoooooooooth is the way to go with this car.

To add to what has gone before, sport mode actually does stiffen the suspension as well as tighten the steering and you might want to try it for faster manoeuvres through roundabouts or other fast changes of direction.

Sport mode can be engaged at any time, stationary or mobile, but it does take around half a second to engage. It is useful for climbing hills as the joint engagement of electric motor and ICE improves torque response and sport mode also changes the shift pattern of the auto box - moving it higher up the rpm scale. There is also a semi-automatic manual mode in Sport mode which allows you to change gear manually. At no point will the car allow you to make any gear change that could potentially cause a problem and most of us find the novelty of manual mode wears off very quickly, although it can be useful under certain circumstances to `hold` the car in gear - although it will still automatically change down to avoid `lugging` and put the car in first at a halt. There is no point in revving the engine out anyway, as all the power is in the midrange.

There is no need for a second gear lock for slow speed use as the power characteristics of the electric motor are ideal for low-traction scenarios. Let the car get on with it, it's far smarter than most drivers...
 

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To add to what has gone before, sport mode actually does stiffen the suspension as well as tighten the steering and you might want to try it for faster manoeuvres through roundabouts or other fast changes of direction.
I first thought sport mode did stiffen the suspension because sport modes typically do, and because the owner manual says "When driving in SPORT mode, the vehicle provides sporty but firm riding." But then Bluecar1 wrote somewhere in this forum that it does not, at as a matter of personal experience in the driver seat, I don't feel the suspension any stiffer when engaging sport mode.

I wish Hyundai would explicitly state what sport mode does and does not change, so we would have facts instead of hypotheses and personal feelings.
 

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I first thought sport mode did stiffen the suspension because sport modes typically do, and because the owner manual says "When driving in SPORT mode, the vehicle provides sporty but firm riding." But then Bluecar1 wrote somewhere in this forum that it does not, at as a matter of personal experience in the driver seat, I don't feel the suspension any stiffer when engaging sport mode.

I wish Hyundai would explicitly state what sport mode does and does not change, so we would have facts instead of hypotheses and personal feelings.
http://www.ioniqforum.com/forum/162025-post33.html

Based on experience. Although it could be a function of the weighted steering (a FACT) and the combined torque load on the suspension of the ICE and motor causing ramp down.
 
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