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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I got a nail in the side wall of my rear-driver tire. Car has < 1,300 miles -- UGH.

No one local could get the exact tire, and I need to drive, so I replaced the OEM "Michelin Primacy All Season" with a "Michelin Primacy A/S" ( same size, 235/55/19)

The major difference I see is that the OEM tire has a max PSI of 51psi vs the non-OEM has a max of 44psi.

Per the sidewalls of both tires, they both have the same load rating. They both have the same basic construction (tread plies, sidewall plies.)

The OEM tires are, cold, set to 40psi.
The non-OEM tire the shop set to a cold 36psi.

(1) Not sure mixing tires is an issue. But it seems impossible that at some point, someone is going to mix tires.
(2) Not sure about the varying tire pressure.

USA OEM ( SE )


Tire Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Synthetic rubber


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I would use the replacement tire temporarily until I could find the tire that matches the OEM tires. Keep the new tire in case you need it in the future. I would think you would set all tires pressures to be the same - as listed in the label on the driver's B-pillar of the car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I would use the replacement tire temporarily until I could find the tire that matches the OEM tires. Keep the new tire in case you need it in the future. I would think you would set all tires pressures to be the same - as listed in the label on the driver's B-pillar of the car.
I hate to have a $313 "temporary" tire.

Maybe I need to dig into the manual and see if they have specific warnings about varying from OEM tires - it seems overly onerous that you can only ever use this particular tire.
 

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Looking at your pictures, it appears the tread patterns are very different and that could be a major issue for any car with ABS and traction control, especially on the driven wheels. It's OK to have different treads and wear rates front and rear but absolutely not OK side to side. The tyre shop should have sold you one for the other side as well.
 

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I hate to have a $313 "temporary" tire.

Maybe I need to dig into the manual and see if they have specific warnings about varying from OEM tires - it seems overly onerous that you can only ever use this particular tire.
Use it almost as a spare. Keep it on until you can get an OEM tire (as long as you don't put a thousand miles on the remaining tires, you should be fine, wear-wise). Then just store it in the garage as a spare just in case.

You could just set all the PSI to the door pillar recommendation. Filling tires to the max PSI is usually the default, but not really necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm getting answers I don't want to hear - but its also why I posted the question.

I think the way forward is to replace the other rear OEM tire with a new matching tire and keep the OEM as the spare.

Thanks again.
 

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At least the size (hence diameter) is the same but you should run the same tire pressures. The new tire is within spec of the recommended pressure so it's probably best to raise that tire to match the OEMs.
 

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FWIW I'm having the exact same issue (first a sidewall tear, now a nail they refuse to patch). Each time my Hyundai dealership has been able to get the "correct" tire (Primacy with the acoustic foam).

But I am super salty about these non-repairable tires and am definitely going to make sure the NEXT set of tires lack the acoustic foam. Some Tesla's apparently also use these tires and owners report that 1. non-acoustic versions don't seem much louder and 2. some tire shops are willing to repair, but many will just see the foam and go "NOPE."

I echo everyone else though - either get a matching pair or just use this tire as an emergency spare while you wait to get the right one.
 

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FWIW I'm having the exact same issue (first a sidewall tear, now a nail they refuse to patch). Each time my Hyundai dealership has been able to get the "correct" tire (Primacy with the acoustic foam).

But I am super salty about these non-repairable tires and am definitely going to make sure the NEXT set of tires lack the acoustic foam. Some Tesla's apparently also use these tires and owners report that 1. non-acoustic versions don't seem much louder and 2. some tire shops are willing to repair, but many will just see the foam and go "NOPE."

I echo everyone else though - either get a matching pair or just use this tire as an emergency spare while you wait to get the right one.
I had acoustic foam tires on prior car (Model Y). They were Continental Pro Contact. I replaced those tires with conventional ones when I upgraded rims. I was of the opinion that the replacement tires were actually quieter and I saw no impact in range.
 

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I had acoustic foam tires on prior car (Model Y). They were Continental Pro Contact. I replaced those tires with conventional ones when I upgraded rims. I was of the opinion that the replacement tires were actually quieter and I saw no impact in range.
Cool, thanks! In good news my local shop managed to install the plug through the foam*. They said they had to get three guys weight on it to push the plug through. I asked if they could just remove the foam around the puncture (as I've seen mentioned in a few places) and the tech just rolled his eyes and said "that's too much bullshit for us." I think the problem is that removing the foam is time-intensive. But if a shop sees a lot of these tires and people are DEMANDING you fix it you learn how to do it faster.

As for the replacement tire that I ordered this morning - I was surprised to hear that it would come in the next day (the first one took 5-6 days). Since it was the exact one that was replaced because of the sidewall shredding and I learned that it came with hazard insurance. So I may get a "free" tire....the Hyundai guy did say that if I got a new tire I could keep the "bad" one.
 

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I hate to have a $313 "temporary" tire.

Maybe I need to dig into the manual and see if they have specific warnings about varying from OEM tires - it seems overly onerous that you can only ever use this particular tire.
On the bright side, it's much better than having a Modern Spare tire as a spare for similar price.
 

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Just for awareness, the foam tires ARE repairable. Many Tesla owners have been told no by various tire shops either out of laziness, lack of knowledge or trying to scam owners into new tires. There are many flats on the Tesla acoustic foam tires that have been repaired. Plugs work but many don't feel comfortable with plugs long term. The correct way to fix is to remove tire from rim, cut away a small section of the foam around the puncture, then place a radial patch internally. Except for cutting the foam, this is the normal procedure for flat repair on radial tires.
 

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I got a nail in the side wall of my rear-driver tire. Car has < 1,300 miles -- UGH.

No one local could get the exact tire, and I need to drive, so I replaced the OEM "Michelin Primacy All Season" with a "Michelin Primacy A/S" ( same size, 235/55/19)

The major difference I see is that the OEM tire has a max PSI of 51psi vs the non-OEM has a max of 44psi.

Per the sidewalls of both tires, they both have the same load rating. They both have the same basic construction (tread plies, sidewall plies.)

The OEM tires are, cold, set to 40psi.
The non-OEM tire the shop set to a cold 36psi.

(1) Not sure mixing tires is an issue. But it seems impossible that at some point, someone is going to mix tires.
(2) Not sure about the varying tire pressure.

USA OEM ( SE )

one two or four replacements
View attachment 43628

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I presume the same holds true for sidewall punctures though .. i.e., not repairable (which was my case.)
True, but the definition of "sidewall" puncture will vary with tire shops. When I owned a Volt I got a screw in the tire which was in the recessed tread section closest to sidewall. Waited till next day, aired it up and drove to Costco for their "free" flat repair. I was first one there and waited, they didn't look at it till 12:30 and told me it was a "sidewall" puncture and I needed to order new tire. Left and went to a local independent tire shop and just asked for flat repair. They pulled tire off rim and put an internal patch on it. I then told them that Costco called it a sidewall puncture and they just laughed.
 

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I had acoustic foam tires on prior car (Model Y). They were Continental Pro Contact. I replaced those tires with conventional ones when I upgraded rims. I was of the opinion that the replacement tires were actually quieter and I saw no impact in range.
New tires are usually quieter than worn tires. I doubt that acoustic foam is a sales gimmick (who would base a new car purchase solely on such a claim?) , but you may only be able to tell if replacing acoustic new tires with regular new tires. Which would be a silly expense just to prove a point one way or the other.
 

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New tires are usually quieter than worn tires. I doubt that acoustic foam is a sales gimmick (who would base a new car purchase solely on such a claim?) , but you may only be able to tell if replacing acoustic new tires with regular new tires. Which would be a silly expense just to prove a point one way or the other.
Just an FYI, when I changed tires, it was really to upgrade the rims and they only had 1200 miles on them so it was a legitimate comparison.
 
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