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Hyundai sent me this:

"I have clarified the packaging with our product team. The EV is available in 3 trim levels: SE, SE with Cold Climate Package and Limited. The base SE is the only trim level without the Cold Climate Package. This was done for certain parts of British Columbia which don’t experience aggressively low temperatures. My apologies for the earlier confusion.

The vehicle you are driving is an SE with Cold Climate Package. The “Comfort” on the key tag is a bit of the original internal nomenclature that is not relevant to consumers.

The car comes with a 110-120v adapter. A 240v home charger can be installed by several third party companies. The government offers rebates for both the purchase and installation of a home 240v charger. The vast majority of EV owners do have a home charger installed. "

Which makes sense, as it jives with the information given by earlier media channels.

Given how long it takes to recharge with the 120v connection, installing a 240v charger is a no-brainer.
 

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Hyundai sent me this:

The car comes with a 110-120v adapter. A 240v home charger can be installed by several third party companies. The government offers rebates for both the purchase and installation of a home 240v charger. The vast majority of EV owners do have a home charger installed. "
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Since you seem to have an in with Hyundai, can you ask them if they have a recommended home charger for the Canadian market.

At the auto show there were many Flo chargers and many Bolt owners seem to be using EVduty stations - both Canadian made. I suspect either works but curious if Hyundai has a recommendation. Asked at the dealers but they were unaware of a recommendation.

Where I thought it may be important is how the charger might work with the app. Specifically how do things work together for time of day charging and preconditioning before it's time to leave (warming or cooling the car)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Since you seem to have an in with Hyundai, can you ask them if they have a recommended home charger for the Canadian market.

At the auto show there were many Flo chargers and many Bolt owners seem to be using EVduty stations - both Canadian made. I suspect either works but curious if Hyundai has a recommendation. Asked at the dealers but they were unaware of a recommendation.

Where I thought it may be important is how the charger might work with the app. Specifically how do things work together for time of day charging and preconditioning before it's time to leave (warming or cooling the car)
Very good question, I will... hopefully they'll have some data to share!
 

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I cant see that there are any reason for anything to be betther for this spesific car vs other cars...

Buy a quality charger that have reputation to not burn down your house, or have many faults, and you are good...

Guess Hyundai Canada also have a "deal" with someone to deliver the come chargers when bought with car?

(Here its Salto / ABL Sursum )
 

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I cant see that there are any reason for anything to be betther for this spesific car vs other cars...
Charging stations appear to now be offering wifi interfaces and I am curious if there is some integration with a Hyundai app - an advantage if they are working with Hyundai.

The Hyundai app appears to be evolving (what isn't these days) trying to improve it after some less than favourable reactions by users (other models and in Europe). Working on finding out if the app is worldwide (with language variations) or if there are North American/ Canadian variants (English/French). Not quite sure how this all relates to trim levels and "blue link" services and if they are even available in Canada .. too bad the dealers can't answer these questions.
 

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Hyundai sent me this:

"I have clarified the packaging with our product team. The EV is available in 3 trim levels: SE, SE with Cold Climate Package and Limited. The base SE is the only trim level without the Cold Climate Package. This was done for certain parts of British Columbia which don?t experience aggressively low temperatures. [/QUOTED-PRINTABLE E]

What determines you warrant the Cold Climate Package and what is it? It seems to be available for Scandinavia but, for example, not the far North of Scotland.
 

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I was thinking about it, and I'm not sure for me a 240V home charger is necessary. Most of my trips are under 15km, and there are quite a few days the car isn't used. Only on weekends running errands we might do more.

So even if the 120V takes a long time to charge, I'd only be replacing 2 or 3 kwh each day, and maybe 10-15kwh on weekends. So I'd really only need to get the car to 100% overnight if we were taking a road trip the next day, and there will soon be a lot more L2 and L3 chargers available in Ontario. Just saw the new L3 chargers at Ikea yesterday.

Then again, with the provincial rebates, it is tempting just to get a home charger.
 

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So, you may not really need a 240 V charger, but it still may be a bit more convenient, and at times helpful in unexpected situations in which you need charge earlier than anticipated.
 

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If you get a 240V charger then you cover all bases and should be well placed if your circumstances change and you do more miles in a day. If that happens and you only have 120V either you are in for a long wait or a trip to a type2/3 charger and a wait there. I would prefer the former option.
 

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It take 24 hours to do a full charge at 120V. You need around 2 hours to top up 15KM trip. Your driving pattern does not really warrant a L2 charger but it free you from juggling around if you have to take longer trips. It only take 4.5 hour to do a full charge with a L2 charger.

In Ontario you get a rebate of 50% up to $500 on the purchase of the charger and 50% up to $500 for the installation of the charger by a licensed electrician. If you are handy enough you can install the wiring yourself. A basic charger cost around $700. So for $4-500 you get yourself a L2 charger.

Visit this site. They carry multiple brand of charger. If you happen to live in GTA you can visit their showroom. They are located in Highway 7 and Dufferin.

Home

Even if Hyundai recommends a specific brand of charger, you don't have to stick to that brand. L2 charger is very simple device which you can even build yourself. There are open source project and kit that you can buy but these kits does not qualify for the rebates.

https://www.openevse.com/
 

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So, you may not really need a 240 V charger, but it still may be a bit more convenient, and at times helpful in unexpected situations in which you need charge earlier than anticipated.
If you get a 240V charger then you cover all bases and should be well placed if your circumstances change and you do more miles in a day. If that happens and you only have 120V either you are in for a long wait or a trip to a type2/3 charger and a wait there. I would prefer the former option.
It take 24 hours to do a full charge at 120V. You need around 2 hours to top up 15KM trip. Your driving pattern does not really warrant a L2 charger but it free you from juggling around if you have to take longer trips. It only take 4.5 hour to do a full charge with a L2 charger.

In Ontario you get a rebate of 50% up to $500 on the purchase of the charger and 50% up to $500 for the installation of the charger by a licensed electrician. If you are handy enough you can install the wiring yourself. A basic charger cost around $700. So for $4-500 you get yourself a L2 charger.

Visit this site. They carry multiple brand of charger. If you happen to live in GTA you can visit their showroom. They are located in Highway 7 and Dufferin.

Home

Even if Hyundai recommends a specific brand of charger, you don't have to stick to that brand. L2 charger is very simple device which you can even build yourself. There are open source project and kit that you can buy but these kits does not qualify for the rebates.

https://www.openevse.com/
All your points are all valid, but apparently they're going to put a Level 3 charger in at the parking lot across the street. I might wait to see how much that'll cost, because that would make it really convenient to get an unplanned charging session.

Also, we're renovating our kitchen soon, so if I can get by without putting in an L2, it might be worth it.

Although I do like the idea of being able to turn the charger on remotely like Jan mentioned in another thread, since Hyundai doesn't have an app to control the charging remotely.

That would be something well worth adding by Hyundai, but not at the cost of easily hackable software like most other car manufacturers seem to add to their connected cars.
 

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I don't think a L3 charging will be free. If they are free at the beginning I can't them being free in the long run. There are lots of L2 charging is charging from $2 to $5 or more per session. In the long run a home charger is move cost effective. You can definitely get by with a L1 charger as you are using less than 10% of the capacity.

Without Blue Link we cannot preheat the vehicle and battery but we can still remote charge the vehicle. Some charger premium model do have remote start capability so it is not necessary to have the in-vehicle application. For example the Chargepoint CPH25 series and JuiceBox Pro 40 to name a couple have apps to control charging.
 

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Without Blue Link we cannot preheat the vehicle and battery but we can still remote charge the vehicle. Some charger premium model do have remote start capability so it is not necessary to have the in-vehicle application. For example the Chargepoint CPH25 series and JuiceBox Pro 40 to name a couple have apps to control charging.
Without any app for the car to preheat the car you can still use the option of scheduled charging and preheating. For this to work you have to leave the charging station to be in the standby mode, or activate it by an app for that.

P.S. See also this topic, and post #8 there.
 

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I don't think a L3 charging will be free. If they are free at the beginning I can't them being free in the long run. There are lots of L2 charging is charging from $2 to $5 or more per session. In the long run a home charger is move cost effective. You can definitely get by with a L1 charger as you are using less than 10% of the capacity.

Without Blue Link we cannot preheat the vehicle and battery but we can still remote charge the vehicle. Some charger premium model do have remote start capability so it is not necessary to have the in-vehicle application. For example the Chargepoint CPH25 series and JuiceBox Pro 40 to name a couple have apps to control charging.
I know the L3 won't be free, but I'd only need it for when I forget to charge it overnight and I need a full charge for a trip the next day, so even if it costs $10-$15 for an occasional QC session, that still ends up being a lot less than getting a home L2.

I suppose I could always start with L1 once I do get an EV, and see how it goes.
 

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New to the forum... just reading some of the comments on Level 2 chargers. One thing I haven't read about yet is whether the L1 charger included with the Ioniq might handle 240V, which will double your charging rate (though still not charge at the maximum rate). Even if it can't out of the box, it might be able to with some modification. There are many Gen2 Chevy Volt owners doing just this using only a cheap plug adapter - basically it delivers hot-hot (240V) instead of the usual hot-neutral you would get from a standard North American 120V outlet. The unit is still limited to 12A however, which is not a huge deal on the Volt since it can only handle 16A max. But if you only need L2 charging occasionally this may be enough.

I am actually using a Gen2 Volt charger purchased off eBay to charge my iMiEV since the included L1 unit only does 8A. I'm not using 240V regularly at the moment (not really needed, round trip commute is 40km) but I have tested it and it works.
 

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This really depend on the charger that come with the vehicle. If it can operate at 240V and output more than 12A than you can feed it 240V and have a shorter charging time. If you are going to hack it this way, make sure the socket you are going to use is not the regular NEMA 5-15 socket. You don't want accident when someone think that it is a "regular" socket and plug in a regular device.
 

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Its going to take some situations till the market realizes they need to make simple connections idiot proof. Best of all it won't be that hard.
 

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This really depend on the charger that come with the vehicle. If it can operate at 240V and output more than 12A than you can feed it 240V and have a shorter charging time.
In the Netherlands charging directly from your own grid (240V) can take 6, 9 or 12A. It is indicated that it will take about 12 hours from 0% to 100%. I did not try it yet as I have a charging station at home for 16A.
 
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