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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good forum guys - especially the main contributors! You know who you are!

3 months ago I was happily driving BMW 530D ... awesome car in every way, apart from the diesel fumes and 32mpg.
And then the bill to have the DPF replaced. Then I was rear-ended ... total write-off. Wish that had happened before the DPF!

2 months ago I got a temporary replacement car from insurance co ... Lexus IS 300 hybrid.
Liking the 47mpg. Starting to become a hybrid convert...
2.5 litre engine and feels nearly as fast as the BMW for normal use. Fast enough (in sports mode). Liking the instant pull away at junctions.

2 weeks ago discovered the Hyundai Ioniq ... maybe I can afford this!
Over 70mpg!

Now - ordered one. The Premium in blue. Delivery in 2 weeks.

The Lexus feels cramped, difficult to get out of, noisier, not nearly as economical, £10k more. But definitely faster. One pro, lots of cons.

2 months in the Lexus vs 30 mins test drive in the Ioniq - so early days yet. I think the Ioniq will save me over £100 in petrol per month (over the BMW), so that's a good offset on the cost of the lease.

That's my story!

Now, just wondering where I can buy a conversion kit to make the hybrid into a plug-in ... just to top that battery up! Anyone hacked their Ioniq yet?! Or as I call it, the Iconic (and sometimes the Ironic ... but only cos it rhymes!). It's really hard not to call it an Iconic once you start (sorry!).

Looking forward to more driving tips. So using the brakes recharges the battery .... but controlling speed so you don't have to use brakes, saves more petrol in the first place. I don't know which is best, but my brain tells me the second one. Whereas other advice would have you driving hard, braking hard. We'll see ...
 

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welcome Judge


only the first light levels of braking charge the battery, the display on the left (bottom 6 segments show the level of regen braking / charging of the battery) once applying more pressure to the brake pedal don't increase the regen braking on the display you then use mechanical brakes but still generate power for the battery


if that makes sense


if you use smart cruise it will brake to keep the set speed and in doing so charges the battery as well


there is no way to convert the hybrid to a plugin or charge the battery from an external source (dealers may be able to do it, but not sure), thebattery on a hybrid is 1.56kwh, the plugin is around 6kwh and a larger more powerful electric motor


to get the best out of it,gentle acceleration and braking and you will see 70ish mpg


60mph under cruise returns about 66mpg
70mph under cruise returns about 60mpg
round town short journeys I haven't managed to see less than 55mpg


sport mode tends to use electric and ICE together most of the time and be more aggressive at recharging battery


hope that helps


BC1
 

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I would say converting hybrid to plugin hybrid would be far from cost effective. There is the battery pack to replace, charging point in the wing to install, the wiring loom etc. Whilst it may be technically possible. Not sure how you would go about getting it recognised (not sure where you are) by your government body to recognise it as a PHEV and therefore save money on tolls etc. Plus remember you are dealing with a huge amount of power

Would be awesome to do that as a project, but think it's not viable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for replies guys!

The plug-in challenge is only half serious ... but this interests me:

>charge the battery from an external source (dealers may be able to do it, but not sure)

Now if that is combined with something else I read about the battery 'normally being 60% full' (but I may have dreamt that) - then in winter, an overnight charge to the battery could be a good thing. So many things using the electricity in winter ... heated seats, rear window, mirrors, AC, lights, wipers, ...

My 'project' wouldn't be to duplicate the real plug-in Ioniq, but to just make the hybrid a bit better. Squeeze a few more mpg out of it.

So all I need is info on whether the battery is really 60% full in the evening, and how to do the 'dealer-only' charge to top-up from a 'normal' supply. Both those things may be myths of course!

PS Another bad thing about the Lexus hybrid ... on recirculated air the windows mist up (AC is on), so I need to use the heated rear window a lot more. That never happened in the BMW. Hope it won't happen in the Ioniq. Obviously the more electric we use, the lower the mpg.
 

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... on recirculated air the windows mist up
Of course, if you have re-circulation ON long enough, windows will start to mist up because of the moisture we humans breath and sweat out. In these cold mornings I always start with re-circulation ON to heat the interior quicker. If I see fogging windows occur, I switch re-circulation OFF and the windows will start to clear. If I forget to switch re-circulation OFF, the IONIQ will switch it OFF after some time.
Another thing is the Automatic De-mist System of the front screen (ADS). It will detect if the front screen needs de-fogging and, if so, will turn the air to the front screen and use airco to dry the air. It will do this every now and then and you will hardly notice it.
There is a button to force quick windscreen de-fogging. It will use a high fan setting with airco and temp to demist the windscreen quickly.
If you hold this button for 3 seconds, the automatic de-fogging system can be toggled ON and OFF.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hmmm, I thought the aircon should dry the air even on recirc so it shouldn't fog up. The BMW did that. The Lexus didn't. Don't know about the Ioniq yet ... hoping for the best!

I don't like the sound of it turning recirc off automatically after a time - the only reason to use it is to stop outside fumes/smells from entering the cockpit. So if it overrides my decision I won't be happy! I'm not a fan of diesel fumes in stop/start traffic. Poison!
 

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Hmmm, I thought the aircon should dry the air even on recirc so it shouldn't fog up. The BMW did that. The Lexus didn't. Don't know about the Ioniq yet ... hoping for the best!
Just a note on the above point - Not all cars actually allow you to use recirc and aircon (at the same time) aimed at the windscreen. For some reason VWs dont (much to my current dismay... maybe the vents are set up incorrectly).
Even the wife's new VW wont do it. It says it is, but if you whack the fan speed up you can't hear the recirc sucking in the air any more. :|
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Interesting - we got a VW Up a couple of weeks ago - I'll check that. The last Up we had didn't even have aircon or recirc! This one is higher spec.
 

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Interesting idea however I think you will have to wait for several years unless Hyundai offers it. I am certain that this type of modification would void the lifetime warranty on the battery and I don't think anyone would be foolish enough to risk it. I had a similar post asking about PV on the roof, essentially adding an external power to the battery when it's not being driven.
 

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Hmmm, I thought the aircon should dry the air even on recirc so it shouldn't fog up. The BMW did that. The Lexus didn't. Don't know about the Ioniq yet ... hoping for the best!

I don't like the sound of it turning recirc off automatically after a time - the only reason to use it is to stop outside fumes/smells from entering the cockpit. So if it overrides my decision I won't be happy! I'm not a fan of diesel fumes in stop/start traffic. Poison!
No the car doesnt fog up on recirc with aircon off....and no it doesnt turn it off automatically. I often run the car in recirc with aircon on when its hot as it gets the car cooler and stays cooler as you arent heating 30 degree air if you heating fresh air (on the odd day we get that in the UK!)

If you dont have the aircon on the obviously it will fog up the car quickly.

Similarly if you have the auto-defog option on our car and it is very wet then driving with aircon off and leting the auto windscreen defog run on its auto setting it will keep the windscreen clear and also the rest of the car most of the time....a quick blast with the aircon will clear the rest of the windows on a really wet day every now and then as required.

One thing I do notice with the Ioniq vs my previous cars is that if you run the aircon to demist the car then the car doesnt immediately fog up even worse than before like my others used to. Maybe its the climate control, or maybe its the auto defog feature that makes it that way but either way I like it
 

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Welcome Judge!

Not sure on the merits of recharging the HEV battery, even were it to be possible - is it really big enough to give you a range that actually is of any use? I can eke about 6 miles out of mine, the driving technique needed means crawling around - I've only ever driven like that on large industrial sites with no traffic. You won't be able to drive like that on the road as the cars electronics will have the ICE cut in anyway as the battery depletes or as you call for acceleration. Having the ICE charge the battery is the only real option because of the constant need to recharge en route - the battery and ICE are matched and balance. The PHEV has a larger battery for that very reason - about 30 miles battery range and therefore worthwhile topping off at the plug, particularly if in doing so you can save much of the ICE use on short journeys - although it will still cut in!

I think you will be pleasantly surprised by just letting the car get on with it. It's much smarter than previous generation hybrids.

As for the demisting and the aircon, bear in mind you bought a hybrid so the ICE will kick in at start-up anyway - even if only to warm/cool the battery pack. FWIW I've never used the recirculation option in 8 months and 15,000 miles - the air con is highly efficient and only makes about 1-2 mpg difference if its on or off and the filters are easily as good as the ones on my previous Volvo's. The (air con driven) demist system is hugely efficient and clears the screen in seconds, even in the dead of winter in the UK. Actually takes longer for the door mirrors to clear. I rarely turn it off, just limit it to the drivers side and let it get on with it, as well.
 

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Now - ordered one. The Premium in blue. Delivery in 2 weeks.

The Lexus feels cramped, difficult to get out of, noisier, not nearly as economical, £10k more. But definitely faster. One pro, lots of cons.

2 months in the Lexus vs 30 mins test drive in the Ioniq - so early days yet. I think the Ioniq will save me over £100 in petrol per month (over the BMW), so that's a good offset on the cost of the lease.
Notwithstanding the dubious idea of converting your yet to be received HEV into a PHEV when Hyundai sell a PHEV Ioniq anyway, I'm wondering what your finance company will charge you to have to car put back to its original state at the end of the lease? We've got members on this forum worried about having to cough up £150 for a replacement wheel trim at the end of their leases, so I think you ought to run the economics of your idea past another person and not Diane Abbott!>:)
 

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Welcome Judge!

Not sure on the merits of recharging the HEV battery, even were it to be possible - is it really big enough to give you a range that actually is of any use? I can eke about 6 miles out of mine, the driving technique needed means crawling around - I've only ever driven like that on large industrial sites with no traffic. You won't be able to drive like that on the road as the cars electronics will have the ICE cut in anyway as the battery depletes or as you call for acceleration. Having the ICE charge the battery is the only real option because of the constant need to recharge en route - the battery and ICE are matched and balance. The PHEV has a larger battery for that very reason - about 30 miles battery range and therefore worthwhile topping off at the plug, particularly if in doing so you can save much of the ICE use on short journeys - although it will still cut in!

I think you will be pleasantly surprised by just letting the car get on with it. It's much smarter than previous generation hybrids.
Plus, having a fully charged battery is a BAD idea.....its a hybrid...The whole concept of the hybrid engine is to harvest the wasted energy to supplement the ICE. If your battery is full then you may have charged it up on cheap electricity but in effect you are wasting energy as it cannot be stored. Admittedly you would have to pull out of your driveway onto a downhill to achieve that but the concept of the cars operation seems to be about maximising efficiency and therefore having spare capacity for charge/discharge for those scenarios. Of course its life so it will still max out sometimes but thats life.

As Steve says the engine is designed for the ICE to cut in and out and equally for the battery/motor to supplement the ICE with its efficiency and associated power loss that it brings simply because there is a motor to offset things. It's a well engineered package.
 
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