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Discussion Starter #1
To be fair, I doubt whether anyone will know the answer to this, but I need to ask anyway....

During the current lock-down, I won't be able to drive my hybrid Ioniq. So I'm anxious about the 12v lithium battery. I know that I cannot connect a battery conditioner to it (on my 2019 model, the propulsion and 12v batteries are linked and buried under the back seat: do not touch!). I also know that, if the 12v is flat, it is nevertheless possible to open the driver's door mechanically using the metal key, but that process is a right palaver.

So what drains the 12v battery when the car is parked outdoors? Well, the alarm, presumably. And the (whatever it's called - is it RFID?) radio device which "listens" for an approaching smart key and opens the mirrors ready to unlock.

So, I thought, I'll park the car in the garage and leave the car unlocked. Alarm not set. No drain.

But overnight, a sudden thought. Because the car is unlocked, is it now continuously searching for an approaching smart key? Assuming yes, then this is the question: all other things being equal, will the 12v battery drain faster when the car is left unlocked?

Too much time on my hands: hence daft quations!

(Another one is Can I stop the car and switch off whilst the car is in neutral, not in Park? I tried but couldn't - it wouldn't switch off. I'd like to do this to enable me to push the car back and forth occasionally so as not to leave it standing on same patch of tyre, but without starting the engine. Ho Hum.)

Cymro
 

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Same car model, similar circumstances excepting my car is parked outside my door.
To prevent 12 volt depletion I wound up my car (in Park mode) for 20 minutes and kept the throttle pressed which forced the engine to charge the battery pack and the 12V section.
If I ever have to use the mechanical key to access the battery boost button.....I'll simply leave the door key cover off until I surface from months of lockdown......you ain't wrong....it's one 'ell a fiddly task.

I too am bored.....my task for today is to see if I can improve my wifi signal in the kitchen.....I'm hoping a reset of signal booster gets the signal back to normal.
 

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Where do you live that you can't drive anywhere? I left mine for 3 months with no issues, The battery is large and the draw VERY small
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Where I live (rural South Wales, UK) is irrelevant: my wife and I are over 70, and have underlying health issues. The National Health Service wants the likes of us to remain at home, and to avoid all non-essential journeys. Our brilliant neighbours keep us supplied as necessary. Accordingly, I shall not use the Ioniq for some months.

I'm not sure that the battery - the 12v battery, not the propulsion one - is large. Do you happen to know the amper hours rating of that 12v battery, please? That information would be useful in determining how long the battery can be left before the small drain empties it.

Cymro
 

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I should imagine the drain on the battery would be minimal whilst waiting for a key signal . The alarm drain is most likely greater . So leaving it unlocked in the garage should be OK as long as you have a secure garage .No battery problems with my previous Ioniq, my new one's only a month old so too early to say on that one .
Maybe ,as suggested earlier leave the door key cover off for the time being ? Or even start it up every 2 weeks or so to charge the battery and clear any cobwebs out of the ICE ?
 

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The actual static drain on the 12 volt battery is almost irrelevant. The protective relay will open when the voltage drop reaches some threshold whether the drain is fast or slow thus cutting off further drain until the battery "reset" button is pressed.

You could disconnect the 12 volt battery I suppose, but that will be a bit more hassle for little real gain. Instructions attached.
 

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Wont the 12v battery be charged from the Main battery from time to time if the appropriate option is set in the menu.

Alec
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all for amazingly quick and helpful responses!

Westkent: now that I know that the 12v battery is 45AH, and (Chunga68) knowing now that the alarm is off when the doors are unlocked, the 12v battery should indeed cope for a very long time with the only drain on it (which is from the RFID smart-key searching.).

Ytcolev: thanks for the pdf, but that's probably beyond my levels of confidence and competence. And the probable hassle of re-setting things on re-connection fills me with dread!

And finally, Alec, what option are you referring to, please?

Again, many thanks to you all. The consensus is that I needn't worry - just leave it alone in the garage, unlocked.

Cymro
 

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There is a menu option on my PHEV for the 12v battery to be charged from the main battery if it gets low.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks, Alec, but I haven't got a PHEV. Mine is the 2019 Hybrid, and as yet I haven't found such an option. However, I do have the 12v battery reset button on the dashboard, whereby the 12v battery can be given a boost from the propulsion battery sufficient to enable the 12v battery to start the ICE and thereby charge the two batteries. Were my 12v battery to go flat because of lack of use of the car, that's the button I'd press.

Cymro
 

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Hello Cymro,

To complete this thread: below what is written in the manual. Note that this is for the 2019/2020 Ioniq and the (printed Dutch) manual still incorrectly has some sections about connecting a trickle charger to charge the battery. This is not possible.

This vehicle does not have a regu-
lar 12V battery that needs periodic
replacement. It is lithium ion poly-
mer type integrated into the HEV
high voltage battery. The vehicle
has a 12V battery protection sys-
tem that cuts 12V battery from
vehicle draw to prevent full dis-
charge. If vehicle will not start, first
try pressing the 12V Battery Reset
switch (left side of the steering
wheel near the fuel door open
switch) to reconnect the 12V bat-
tery, but you must start vehicle
within 15 seconds of pressing the
12V Battery Reset switch. After
starting vehicle, operate the vehi-
cle safely outdoors in ready mode
stopped and/or drive it for 30 min-
utes total to charge the 12V battery
fully.
 

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I have just had the AA round to start my ioniq after just two days standing.He said make sure you lock the car when leaving it overnight! I hope this does not confuse the issue.This is the second time this has happened.At that time dealer checked the car over and said no fault was found but now the dealerships are closed so will have to wait for diagnosis.I am starting to think about a change when life returns to normal!,
 

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I have just had the AA round to start my ioniq after just two days standing.He said make sure you lock the car when leaving it overnight! I hope this does not confuse the issue.This is the second time this has happened.At that time dealer checked the car over and said no fault was found but now the dealerships are closed so will have to wait for diagnosis.I am starting to think about a change when life returns to normal!,
I'm assuming you have an older Ioniq with the lead /acid battery as you didn't mention the 12V reset button . If that's the case , I would suggest you have a faulty battery or a drain of some sort
 

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However, I do have the 12v battery reset button on the dashboard, whereby the 12v battery can be given a boost from the propulsion battery sufficient to enable the 12v battery to start the ICE and thereby charge the two batteries.
It may not matter in the real world knowing how the system functions, but that is not the right description. When the voltage drops, a relay opens disconnecting the battery from all 12 volt systems. The battery "reset" button merely closes that relay allowing 12 volts to reach all systems again, which allows you to "start" the car. If you read your manual, it tells you that if the car goes dead requiring the use of the reset button, to immediately turn the car "on" and leave it on for at least thirty minutes. Only with the car "on" will the traction battery recharge the 12 volt battery. Actually driving the car or having the ICE on is not necessary.

It is the traction battery that actually spins the ICE when needed. But it cannot do that without commands from the 12 volt powered computer.

The system does work rather well as I have had the misfortune to discover first hand, twice! On paper, bluetooth OBD readers have very little power draw but two different devices left inserted drained the battery requiring use of the reset button. Pressing it gave immediate gratification allowing me to turn the car on and go for the planned drive. Still, I'm not pressing my luck and no longer leave a reader plugged in. My suspicion is that the device was able to connect to my cell phone in my house and it was this unintended communication that used excessive power.

But that brings up a couple more 12 volt points. No problem if you leave a cell phone or other USB device plugged in. As long as the car is turned off, the power to the USB times out in a few minutes. However the USB port remains powered so any devices plugged into it have the ability to cause a problem. Also, the interior lights remain powered. I have twice left a reading lamp on overnight but the car still worked in the morning. If left on for a couple days, voltage may drop enough to trip the relay. Worth checking a few times if you are leaving your car parked for more than a day.

If the 12 volt system goes down, it does reset various things. In fact, disconnecting the 12 volt battery may be the first thing the dealer does with a misbehaving car. You can tell when this happens as the average mpg gauge resets, as do the trip meters (the main odometer stays fine). Nothing the owner can do about it, so your comment about trouble resetting things is nothing to worry about. This is not such different behavior from a lot of cars out there and things like fuel mixtures and the DCT may have to relearn previous saved behavior. All in the background.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks again to you all, especially to Yticolev and DKx. I now understand how it all works. I am also much reassured that I'm unlikely to have a problem if I leave the car without using it for several weeks.

I take the point about insurance, thank you.

Cymro
 

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They have checked mine before and said all is fine only for 2 weeks later to be left stranded. I mentioned in another thread, there testing technics let me down on another occasion.
I'm currently on my 3rd 12v for this vehicle and experienced similar with my previous Hyundai.
This is very worrying.My car is an early model reg Nov.2016.Dealer said last time that the battery and charge rates were fine.I was now considering a new battery but in view of your experience would I be wasting my money?I really like the car but I don’t want a car I can’t trust so may have to look at a change-maybe back to Lexus!,
 

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This is a common problem with all EVs that use a lead acid battery for the 12 volt systems. Tesla seems to have it sorted but no one else. Sporadic pulse charging of lead acid batteries doesn't appear to be good for longevity versus constant charging from an alternator. The cure is to use a smart trickle charger. They can actually resuscitate a failing battery so I would try that before a new battery. Use it once a month or so after either that works or you buy a new battery (far less expensive than a new car)!
 
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