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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having had my vehicle (RWD 73 kWh) now for a week at best I have seen 3.6kw per mile with a full charge estimating a range of 237 miles. Down from the promoted 298 miles
For those that have driven the vehicle for a while, is there a ‘sweet spot’ in the balance between regen selection, driver mode and speed?
I drive around mostly around town and A-Roads. So 70mph is not unusual.
 

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The range on the Hyundai website etc is not promoted it is legally the ONLY range that they can quote as they are the official WTLP figures. Your car is still very capable of massive range and if it ran the WTLP tests again today it would achieve the figure on the Hyundai website. The range ESTIMATE on your car is entirely dependant on your driving style. For maximum range not being aggressive with accelerator is good, I would also say 65mph max is good too. However, if you are driving around your local area the range that the car can achieve really does not matter much. Especially as charging at home is much cheaper than buying petrol (if you can find any of the latter). I have regen in 'Auto' which is achieved by a long pull on the right flappy paddle. I just leave it in that mode and just drive the car normally for me. One less this thing to worry about. Having owned such cars for nearly 10 years I find the best thing to do is to just drive the car. If you try messing around with all the regen etc it all becomes a bit of a chore and these much longer range EVs are now taking you out of that mindset. It is all too easy to become obsessed with range in the early days. Move on from that and just drive the car. These new cars just allow you to get on with your life, more cheaply, more eco and no need to go to petrol stations. Just charge when you are getting low overnight and the car is good for the next few days.

CJ
 

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MY20 Kona Highlander electric
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The range on the Hyundai website etc is not promoted it is legally the ONLY range that they can quote as they are the official WTLP figures. Your car is still very capable of massive range and if it ran the WTLP tests again today it would achieve the figure on the Hyundai website. The range ESTIMATE on your car is entirely dependant on your driving style. For maximum range not being aggressive with accelerator is good, I would also say 65mph max is good too. However, if you are driving around your local area the range that the car can achieve really does not matter much. Especially as charging at home is much cheaper than buying petrol (if you can find any of the latter). I have regen in 'Auto' which is achieved by a long pull on the right flappy paddle. I just leave it in that mode and just drive the car normally for me. One less this thing to worry about. Having owned such cars for nearly 10 years I find the best thing to do is to just drive the car. If you try messing around with all the regen etc it all becomes a bit of a chore and these much longer range EVs are now taking you out of that mindset. It is all too easy to become obsessed with range in the early days. Move on from that and just drive the car. These new cars just allow you to get on with your life, more cheaply, more eco and no need to go to petrol stations. Just charge when you are getting low overnight and the car is good for the next few days.

CJ
Yeah, I agree. The software is designed to do all the work for you. I don’t bother adjusting anything other than switching to Eco if I start to get range anxiety. I tried to maximise range when I had a PHEV some years ago, but could never do as well as the software could. I did a bit of fiddling with range-saving when I got my EV 3 years ago but same result, so I just let the car software adjust to my driving style.
 

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2021 Chevy Bolt, reserved Ioniq 5
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I have become addicted to one pedal driving. So if we ever get the Ioniq 5 in the US, I will use Ipedal. Until you are accustomed, to one pedal driving it can be a little disturbing.
 

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I've done about 70 miles and am averaging 4.0 miles per kWh (or might have been 4.2, I can't remember). I like playing with the regen manually, but perhaps I'll outgrow it. I use level 0 as default but as traffic slows ahead I move to level 1, if it slows further, then level 2 and so on. If I can see I'm going to need to come to a complete stop then by this point I'm already in level 3 and going slowly so I drop to i-pedal (or pull on left paddle and hold). If something unexpected happens and I need to go from level 0 to i-pedal then I just pull the left paddle and hold. If that won't be sufficient then I use the brake pedal.

I haven't don't motorway driving yet, but the range test videos online suggest efficiency falls off a cliff at about 70 mph. The suggestion of 65mph seems sensible.

That said, the voice of experience, to just use it, seems wise to me, I just happen to enjoy playing the efficiency game at this point.
 

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Same here... the regen is in Auto mode. Let the car do the thinking.

The best consumption figure I saw so far on my car was 4.5 miles per kWh, when driving at 20-30mph speeds on roads with little traffic, on a mild day (20⁰).

So I gather that the 74kWh battery can do around 330 miles in city driving on non-congested roads, probably more if using i-Pedal and making a conscious effort, which is well above the WLTP figure for the car.

The above is theoretical, of course, because in real life driving you wouldn't want the battery to go below 10%.

The point is that WLTP figures are realistic, but can vary - in either direction - according to driving style, road situation, and environment conditions.
 

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MY20 Kona Highlander electric
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I have become addicted to one pedal driving. So if we ever get the Ioniq 5 in the US, I will use Ipedal. Until you are accustomed, to one pedal driving it can be a little disturbing.
Good point. While the car can do a lot automatically, there will always be some things you like to use. After all you buy a car (or at least I do) because at some level your inner child wants to play with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The range on the Hyundai website etc is not promoted it is legally the ONLY range that they can quote as they are the official WTLP figures. Your car is still very capable of massive range and if it ran the WTLP tests again today it would achieve the figure on the Hyundai website. The range ESTIMATE on your car is entirely dependant on your driving style. For maximum range not being aggressive with accelerator is good, I would also say 65mph max is good too. However, if you are driving around your local area the range that the car can achieve really does not matter much. Especially as charging at home is much cheaper than buying petrol (if you can find any of the latter). I have regen in 'Auto' which is achieved by a long pull on the right flappy paddle. I just leave it in that mode and just drive the car normally for me. One less this thing to worry about. Having owned such cars for nearly 10 years I find the best thing to do is to just drive the car. If you try messing around with all the regen etc it all becomes a bit of a chore and these much longer range EVs are now taking you out of that mindset. It is all too easy to become obsessed with range in the early days. Move on from that and just drive the car. These new cars just allow you to get on with your life, more cheaply, more eco and no need to go to petrol stations. Just charge when you are getting low overnight and the car is good for the next few days.

CJ
Sage advice - many thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've done about 70 miles and am averaging 4.0 miles per kWh (or might have been 4.2, I can't remember). I like playing with the regen manually, but perhaps I'll outgrow it. I use level 0 as default but as traffic slows ahead I move to level 1, if it slows further, then level 2 and so on. If I can see I'm going to need to come to a complete stop then by this point I'm already in level 3 and going slowly so I drop to i-pedal (or pull on left paddle and hold). If something unexpected happens and I need to go from level 0 to i-pedal then I just pull the left paddle and hold. If that won't be sufficient then I use the brake pedal.

I haven't don't motorway driving yet, but the range test videos online suggest efficiency falls off a cliff at about 70 mph. The suggestion of 65mph seems sensible.

That said, the voice of experience, to just use it, seems wise to me, I just happen to enjoy playing the efficiency game at this point.
Had a long motorway drive today to and from London 220 miles. Full charge at the start and down to 3% when we got home. As has been suggested I used Eco mode and regen on Auto. Speed adjusted to 60-65mph depending on traffic. On reflection I think the lowering the speed probably had the biggest impact on the range, as I noticed when it was higher for short periods it would drop.
 

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Averaging 4.2 miles per kWh (73 kWh RWD). Only had it a couple of days and mainly dual carriageway and non congested single carriageway A roads. Eco mode with i-pedal and cruise control at 60mph. I don’t know if i-pedal is the most efficient, but coming from an i3 this feels the most natural to me.

As speed increases the effect of wind resistance increases disproportionately. This is the same for EV and ICE, but we notice it more on an EV as we are paying attention to the range, as opposed to just filling up when the tank gets low.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Averaging 4.2 miles per kWh (73 kWh RWD). Only had it a couple of days and mainly dual carriageway and non congested single carriageway A roads. Eco mode with i-pedal and cruise control at 60mph. I don’t know if i-pedal is the most efficient, but coming from an i3 this feels the most natural to me.

As speed increases the effect of wind resistance increases disproportionately. This is the same for EV and ICE, but we notice it more on an EV as we are paying attention to the range, as opposed to just filling up when the tank gets low.
 

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Averaging 4.2 miles per kWh (73 kWh RWD). Only had it a couple of days and mainly dual carriageway and non congested single carriageway A roads. Eco mode with i-pedal and cruise control at 60mph. I don’t know if i-pedal is the most efficient, but coming from an i3 this feels the most natural to me.

As speed increases the effect of wind resistance increases disproportionately. This is the same for EV and ICE, but we notice it more on an EV as we are paying attention to the range, as opposed to just filling up when the tank gets low.
Well technically it is proportional. Drag increases with the square of speed and power to overcome drag increases with the cube of speed. Unfortunately our I5 is a big square block so isn’t the most aerodynamically efficient. Keep it below 70mph on the motorway if you want to maximise range.
 

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I watched this test:

OK, it's obviously unscientific etc, but it showed regen 3 was a tiny bit more economical. So I have my car set to regen 3. I've had my Premium 73kw for four days with a 50/50 mix of fast dual carriageway and hilly rural driving. I'm getting about 3.6 miles to the KWH. But I would like to see more long term feedback from other owners for sure.
 
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