Hyundai IONIQ Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,843 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
https://newatlas.com/automated-cars-drivers-safety/58700/

“The bottom line is, until automated driving systems are completely reliable and can respond in all situations, the driver must stay alert and be prepared to take over. And this research clearly shows that is not happening, and gets worse as time passes.”(Credit: Rice University)

Still want a self-driving car? :nerd:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
https://newatlas.com/automated-cars-drivers-safety/58700/

“The bottom line is, until automated driving systems are completely reliable and can respond in all situations, the driver must stay alert and be prepared to take over. And this research clearly shows that is not happening, and gets worse as time passes.”(Credit: Rice University)

Still want a self-driving car? :nerd:
I already have one. i let the wife drive... 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
443 Posts
I have a self driving car, and always have had. I drive myself
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,054 Posts
I'm surprised they needed a study for that. I think people would start out more alert for the first few trips and as their trust in the technology grows, they'd become more and more complacent.
I still think it's the future and I do hope that they keep improving it until it doesn't matter how complacent the "driver" is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,843 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I'm surprised they needed a study for that. I think people would start out more alert for the first few trips and as their trust in the technology grows, they'd become more and more complacent.
I still think it's the future and I do hope that they keep improving it until it doesn't matter how complacent the "driver" is.
But it puts added emphasis on the car being able to `out-think`a driver across all permutations and possibilities on the road.
I agree removing the driver from the equation CAN take some of the problematic issues out, but that's a long way from out-thinking a calm and experienced driver and replacing him/her with machine thinking. The issue here is not the complacency, it's handing over control.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,777 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,808 Posts
I'm not too comfortable with the thought of self driving cars either . I prefer to be in control myself . But if autonomy prevents the two separate morons on two consecutive days overtaking me on the right turn only lane of a roundabout , I'm all for it . When you get on board a plane , how do know the pilot hasn't washed downed breakfast with a bottle of Jack Daniels ? . You can't be afraid of everything .
When or if Autonomy becomes mandatory , I will be a little concerned . Until that time I'll drive as I always have... with my own hands,feet,eyes and ears and ,latterly, using the beneficial driving aids of the car...not relying on them .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,628 Posts
The biggest problem with autonomous cars is they have to travel is space that can potentially be occupied by just about anything, making the chances of encountering an unexpected obstacle very high. Autonomous trains, such as the SkyTrain in Metro Vancouver, are on dedicated tracks that generally do not even have level crossings; hence the chance of an unexpected obstacle is low. Airplanes travel in open air, in general, above the flight path of most birds, where they only have to look out for each other, through radar and other equipment and also always have pilots on board, but again rendering the chance of an unexpected obstacle as low.

While people and animals generally stay off roadways, where cars are travelling, this is not always the case and represents, IMHO, the single biggest obstacle to autonomous cars; along with the fact they still have to cope with bonehead human drivers, many of whom drive unpredictably and erratically.

I'm sorry, but I don't trust automation that much and I don't want to become complacent to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,843 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
The biggest problem with autonomous cars is they have to travel is space that can potentially be occupied by just about anything, making the chances of encountering an unexpected obstacle very high. Autonomous trains, such as the SkyTrain in Metro Vancouver, are on dedicated tracks that generally do not even have level crossings; hence the chance of an unexpected obstacle is low. Airplanes travel in open air, in general, above the flight path of most birds, where they only have to look out for each other, through radar and other equipment and also always have pilots on board, but again rendering the chance of an unexpected obstacle as low.

While people and animals generally stay off roadways, where cars are travelling, this is not always the case and represents, IMHO, the single biggest obstacle to autonomous cars; along with the fact they still have to cope with bonehead human drivers, many of whom drive unpredictably and erratically.

I'm sorry, but I don't trust automation that much and I don't want to become complacent to it.
Well said. And how well does autonomy deal with change? Pilots have had airspace to themselves for decades, now they have to co-exist with drones and soon autonomous aircraft. Surely it can't just be me that sees the potential for conflict?

Now apply that thinking to cars - autonomous vehicles sharing road space with calm-and-careful and fuckwitted and senile drivers alike; mix in a few pissheads and drug-addled motorists, stir in self-entitled cyclists and headphone-consumed pedestrians and see what comes out?

Carnage, I'd suggest. No way can automation deal with that mess of mass transportation. :|
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
I don't want a self-driving car because I enjoy driving.
If I don't feel like driving, I take the bus. :nerd:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
I agree with the previous two posts that a problem exists mixing autonomous and "human" controlled vehicles.
Every day I encounter situations where traffic flows well because drivers use common sense and bend the rules to suit conditions. Again we see traffic in the outside lane on a dual carriageway move to the right to allow emergency vehicles to proceed between traffic - contrary to our Highway Code which says we should move to the left. How do you programme a vehicle system to use common sense?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,202 Posts
I agree with the previous two posts that a problem exists mixing autonomous and "human" controlled vehicles.
Every day I encounter situations where traffic flows well because drivers use common sense and bend the rules to suit conditions. Again we see traffic in the outside lane on a dual carriageway move to the right to allow emergency vehicles to proceed between traffic - contrary to our Highway Code which says we should move to the left. How do you programme a vehicle system to use common sense?
Why would you not merge to the left as required by law? Much safer for all. I see cars every day in the median pulled over by the police and think, no common sense to not merge and pull over on the correct side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
https://newatlas.com/automated-cars-drivers-safety/58700/

“The bottom line is, until automated driving systems are completely reliable and can respond in all situations, the driver must stay alert and be prepared to take over. And this research clearly shows that is not happening, and gets worse as time passes.”(Credit: Rice University)

Still want a self-driving car? :nerd:
After several months of using ACC I switched it to regular cruise control so that I could maintain an actual 50MPH through roadworks instead of the car slowing down due to someone in front.

I nearly rear-ended a vehicle because the car didn't slow down on approaching a vehicle in front. Since then I've used regular CC several times, but have always been very aware that I've done so. That first experience put the wind up me good and proper.

Was that initial near-miss the car's fault? Of course not. It was mine, and mine alone, due to inattention and becoming complacent. Technology's great, but it can't replace the nut holding the wheel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,054 Posts
After several months of using ACC I switched it to regular cruise control so that I could maintain an actual 50MPH through roadworks instead of the car slowing down due to someone in front.
I am not understanding the logic here. You can't go faster than the car in front of you (for very long). If the car in front of me is varying their speed too much, I just switch off cruise control entirely until I can get around them because I think I can modulate my speed more efficiently than the ACC can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,202 Posts
AEB works the same in either cruise control mode, or manual driving. The only difference is that you can set a minimum follow distance in ACC. But when it slows to meet that setting, it is not the AEB algorithm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,628 Posts
After several months of using ACC I switched it to regular cruise control so that I could maintain an actual 50MPH through roadworks instead of the car slowing down due to someone in front.
I should think ACC should be put to better use there.

I nearly rear-ended a vehicle because the car didn't slow down on approaching a vehicle in front. Since then I've used regular CC several times, but have always been very aware that I've done so. That first experience put the wind up me good and proper.

Was that initial near-miss the car's fault? Of course not. It was mine, and mine alone, due to inattention and becoming complacent. Technology's great, but it can't replace the nut holding the wheel.
I use ACC quite regularly when on long stretches, but I have never become complacent to it. I always watch the road ahead, and if I feel ACC isn't responding quickly enough, and sometimes it hasn't by my perceptions, I intervene by pressing either the brake myself, or the Cancel button. I refuse to trust it entirely and always rely on it as nothing more than a driver aid, not a replacement.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,808 Posts
I should think ACC should be put to better use there.



I use ACC quite regularly when on long stretches, but I have never become complacent to it. I always watch the road ahead, and if I feel ACC isn't responding quickly enough, and sometimes it hasn't by my perceptions, I intervene by pressing either the brake myself, or the Cancel button. I refuse to trust it entirely and always rely on it as nothing more than a driver aid, not a replacement.
That's how I use ACC , almost exclusively on the motorway . I found it works well and I trust it , though I wouldn't dream of taking my eyes off the road :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,202 Posts
If the car in front of me is varying their speed too much, I just switch off cruise control entirely until I can get around them because I think I can modulate my speed more efficiently than the ACC can.
Exactly why I use standard cruise control only. I can make intelligent decisions about the traffic ahead and modulate my constant speed accordingly - mostly with a couple mph adjustment on the CC set speed. I never follow so closely as to be dependent on the vehicle directly in front of me to micromanage my speed.

I get the value of ACC to those commuters who do start stop or slow go traffic on limited access highways. But ACC is a convenience feature for drivers to minimize attention in those conditions, not a way to maximize efficiency.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,628 Posts
I get the value of ACC to those commuters who do start stop or slow go traffic on limited access highways. But ACC is a convenience feature for drivers to minimize attention in those conditions, not a way to maximize efficiency.
Ioniq ACC is useless in stop & go traffic, as it cancels below 10 km/h (5 mph) and doesn't stop the car.

I never follow so closely as to be dependent on the vehicle directly in front of me to micromanage my speed.
There are 4 distance settings you can set to be from the car ahead.
Distance 4 - approximately 52.5 m (172.2 ft)
Distance 3 - approximately 40 m (131.2 ft)
Distance 2 - approximately 32.5 m (106.6 ft)
Distance 1 - approximately 25 m (82 ft)

Even when not using SCC (ACC), I'm always somewhere in the range of Distance 2 and Distance 4. Regardless of how you drive, your speed will always be dependent on and "micromanaged" by the vehicles ahead if there are any and your desired speed is greater than theirs.

I would never use Standard Cruise Control while following another vehicle. Too much work to constantly fiddle with +/- toggle to account for varying speed of traffic ahead and just feels dangerous to me. Without SCC, much easier to do with my right foot on the accelerator pedal; but the point of Cruise Control is to give my foot a rest, so with SCC, the car can worry about the fluctuating speed of the car ahead while my foot gets a rest.

But that doesn't mean one should be completely complacent with it. One should always be ready for it fail, but enjoy that such a failure is rare.

The other aspect of SCC (ACC) that I really appreciate, is it helps stave off any tendency to follow too closely if I'm feeling hurried or the car ahead is travelling ridiculously slow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Why would you not merge to the left as required by law? Much safer for all. I see cars every day in the median pulled over by the police and think, no common sense to not merge and pull over on the correct side.
In heavy traffic which is slow moving or stationary you cannot move to the correct side (left) if it is blocked by a line of vehicles. Emergency service vehicles tend to position themselves making it clear they intend to drive between the two lanes. In less congested conditions no problem moving over.
Irrespective of which way you react how do you teach a self driving system to recognise an emergency vehicle wants to get past?
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top