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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I brought this matter up in this forum a year ago. ("LKAS feeling with LKAS off"). I now come back to the issue as it is developing into a problem. I need to hear if there are other IONIQ owners experiencing the same.

SCENARIO
Driving along on a good straight highway at 90-100 km/h. Little traffic, dry road. Cruise control is on and LKAS is off. The small steering corrections required to keep the car in the lane are made subconsciously. Everything is very relaxed.

Then I start to feel a small resistance in the steering wheel. It is as if the car wants to go straight when I want to make a very small steering correction - just to keep it in the lane. I have to apply a small force to get the steering out of neutral. It is as if the steering wheel is stuck in a straight ahead detent. I gradually increase the small force on the steering wheel until the steering "jolts" out of neutral. My small steering correction has then become an over correction.

After a while the subconscious steering has become a fight between me and the car. There are no large forces involved and I don't regard this as a safety issue. But my effortless and relaxed driving has turned into a tiring exercise demanding continuous attention.

INTERMITTENT
The problem is not there all the time. Never below 60 km/h. Never in city traffic. Not always on long drives. But sometimes it shows up after some 20-30 km of highway driving.

DEALER RESPONS
After a year with this problem I have now brought it up with my dealer. The respons is that this could be a normal behaviour of the electric steering servo. According to the dealer the steering servo goes into a sleep mode after prolonged driving straight ahead and it takes a large steering movement to wake it up.

I refuse to accept this to be a normal behaviour. It must be a fault. My theory is that the steering servo actually does NOT go into sleep mode but rather continues to command "straight ahead" when I want to make a small adjustment. The jolt I feel is when my force overpowers the servo. But that is just a personal guess. I am no expert.

SIMILAR EXPERIENCE?
I have asked in a local Facebook IONIQ group and made contact with some owners with similar experience. One has actually got "everything" in the steering system replaced as a warranty issue whereafter the problem disappeared. I am afraid I have to fight more of a battle with the dealer to get this fixed.
Therefore, I ask in this forum: Have you had this problem?

PS
This is NOT a tire issue.
This is NOT caused by tracks in the asphalt.
This is NOT caused by LKAS (which is switched off when this occurs).
 

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Здравствуйте. Недавно я обнаружил похожую проблему.
Я подозреваю, что это произошло, когда Hyundai официально очистил все ошибки в IONIQ.

Вы не поняли эту проблему?
 

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Google translate says...

"Hello. I recently discovered a similar problem. I suspect this happened when Hyundai officially cleared all the errors in IONIQ.

You did not understand this problem? "

My question is did you get the problem fixed? Hope you have.
Do you get a warning message to say put your hands back on the steering wheel, if you let go for more than 30 seconds?
 

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I sometimes get this problem. I call it "sticktion". As you say, normally on the open road just the lightest of touches on the wheel is required to make those tiny corrections to track. For me when the issue occurs, the amount of force required is a little more, not a lot, but more. The real problem is that once you "crack" it, it's back to normal, so as you say, it results in a tiny over correction. I've only noticed this at speed on freeways, likely because the inputs are so small and light and also only when it's cold - around zero degrees or less. I image that a bushing is contracting/closing ever so slightly more than the contraction of the shaft due to the cold causing the problem - but that's a guess. Perhaps it's a simple as the lubricant getting thicker, who knows? I've never noticed the problem in warmer weather. It's not a big enough deal for me to try and chase down. But perhaps I should. The more reports they get, the more likely some engineer is going to be tasked with finding the cause and correcting it.
 

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I am from Ukraine and translate using Google translator. So sorry for the inaccuracy of the translation.
I’ll tell you how I had this problem. I bought a car a month ago, drove from Korea with a range of 54,000 km.

During this period I traveled 4,000 km. and there was no such problem!

A week ago, I decided to do MOT:
1. Oil in the gearbox.
2. Brake fluid.
3. Computer diagnostics + error reset (to replace the brake fluid, it was necessary to pull out the main fuse in the trunk, which caused an error in the car)

I suspect that this problem occurred after resetting errors!

Today was an electrician Hyundai. He connected to the car and didn’t find the steering wheel settings.
I hoped that he would adjust the stiffness of the steering wheel but this did not happen.
Tomorrow I will go for a test drive of another Ioniq to a friend, maybe this is the normal behavior of the steering wheels, and I just did not notice it before.

If this is not normal steering behavior. My next step will be to contact the service station for the restoration of the steering rack.
I'm madly annoyed when something in the car does not work as it should.
I do not have LKAS.
 

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The problem is solved!
Hyundai electrician, set the centering zero and reset the steering wheel settings. Steering training is automatic.
 

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I also have this issue of the steering resistance above about 40 mph with my 2017 Ioniq. I find no flaws with this car other than that steering issue. It is most noticeable on a straight road at highway speeds. It becomes a fight with the car to remain in the center of the lane. It is the sole reason for me searching for an Ioniq forum to see if someone else has seen this issue. I ordered a PDF shop manual on eBay earlier this morning to try to get to the bottom of this.

I will be contacting the dealer, but we are in the Covid-19 period, so we'll see where that goes.
 

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Electrician did not solve the problem!
Solved the problem this way:
1. Removed the steering rack anthers and greased the steering rack.
2. Tightened the steering rack bolt

I did this procedure in March, now there are no problems with the steering wheel!

If you solve the riddle of the steering wheel write, please!
 

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I am scheduled for maintenance at the dealer on Monday. I will report back with the results.

Larry
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hello all
As discussion starter I owe you an update on how my steering issue has developed. I brought it up with my dealer who took it to the "most experienced technician/engineer" at Hyundai Sweden. The answer was "never heard of" and that it could be "normal steering characteristics".

I didn't accept that as the final word in the discussion so I started googling and learned about the IONIQ steering system. Soon I came across the expression "sticky steering". The phenomenon is definitely not unknown to neither Hyundai nor Kia. The two manufacturers appear to have similar steering systems in many of their models. Try googling "sticky steering kia hyundai" and you will see plenty of evidence that this is a well known issue.

The problem is tricky to get hold on. It does not appear on all cars. It is not there all the time. Never below 60 km/h. Never in city traffic. It comes sometimes and then it doesn't show up until after some 20-40 km of highway driving. It is more common at low temperatures (I have never experienced it in the summer, it has always been below +5 degC when I've felt it). It is very difficult to demonstrate the issue as you never know when it will show up.

When the problem is bad it is VERY ANOYING and then I feel I definitely need a fix for it. But then, the following day, the problem is gone and may be gone for weeks or months - until it shows up again.

THEORY
I am still no expert, but after googling and reading I have created my own theory on what's going on. (If you ARE an expert, please correct and enlighten me.)

In the steering shaft there is a torque sensor and an MDPSCM (Motor Driven Power Steering Command Module) which is a computer adapting the steering characteristics to the driving conditions (mostly speed). The MDPSCM decides how much power asistance shall be added to the steering torque applied by the driver. When cruising straight ahead at freeway speeds, the power assistance shall be zero, i.e. the steering is manual. However, should the torque sensor detect a torque exceeding a certain value, then he power steering cuts in to assist. But that does normally not happen when driving straight at highway speeds. All those tiny corrections to keep the car in the lane are made manually.

Now what happens if there, for whatever reason, is mechanical resistance downstream of the torque sensor? The driver applies a small torque to make a tiny correction, but the resistance prevents steering to occur. The driver applies a little more torque and then, above a certain torque, the MDPSCM will kick in power assist and accomplish the steering ouput by overpowering the mechanical resistance. When that happens the driver feels a sudden jerk and a decrease of steering torque and the car has made an overcorrection, which will require a steering input in the opposite direction. And so it goes.

So, the problem is caused by excess mechanical resistance (friction) downstream of the torque sensor in combination with the logic programmed into the MDPSCM. So far my theory.

EXCESSIVE MECHANICAL RESISTANCE
Then, what could cause increased resistance in the steering system?
(a) low tire pressure will increase steering torque
(b) friction in steering rack/pinion and any joints close to the wheels
(c) friction in the U-joints in the steering shaft.

FIXES
My googling found that a number of people have had the problem fixed (after having luck to be able to demonstrate the issue to the dealer). The fixes most often applied are
(a) replacement of the entire steering shaft assembly (MDPS), or
(b) lubrication of the two U-joints in the steering shaft.

(a) seems to be a bit overkill. They replace the entire MDPS without pinpointing what is actually wrong with the old one. But the method appears to work. Many owners report the problem disappeared with the MDPS replacement.

(b) is a cheap fix. In the steering shaft there are two U-joints, one under the dasboard and one somewhere in the pedal reqion on the cabin side of the fire wall. Both joints seem to suffer from bad lubrication on some cars. There are a number of stories out there how the problem has been fixed by lubricating these joints. However, it is not known how long lasting such fix is.

32065


This happened to my car

My dealer listened with attention to my theory, but explained that they could not replace the entire steering column (MDPS) if the problem could not be demonstrated to them. In December I brought the car in. They made a test drive and, as expected, they did not experience any "sticky steering". They lubricated the two U joints.

After that the problem was gone! Almost... I think it is still there now and then, but only very mildly. I haven't had the problem badly after the lubrication. I am not sure this is the end of the story, but at the moment I don't have energy to pursue the matter any further.
 

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I heard from the dealer today regarding my steering "sticking" problem. They cannot document the issue themselves. He is in the business for 20 years and never heard of this problem before. They cannot fix something that is not demonstrated to be broken by their technician. At one point the service manager said they cannot get paid for a fix unless they document a problem, then denied saying that when I repeated his words. I asked if they drove it on a highway above 40 mph and they had not. I asked if they can just lubricate the steering system and he said there are no places to lubricate on the cars today....not like the old days.

I was not happy and asked what they would do if their technician reported exactly this problem and he said they would attempt to fix it with something like a software upgrade or a part replacement. After about 10 minutes of back and forth, he said he would have his technician take the car out on the highway and drive at highway speeds to try and duplicate the issue. The previous person I spoke with said that they are NOT ALLOWED to test at highway speeds.

I am expecting him to call me back later today. I fully expect them to report no problems detected. I'll report back.
 

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The Hyundai dealer, as expected, could not demonstrate the steering problem I reported. The manager of the service department claims he took the car onto the highway himself and never felt the sticking steering wheel. I asked if the issue will get reported to Hyundai USA and he said he can only report those issues IF they can be documented by a technician. I asked if he could lubricate the universals and he said there is nothing to lubricate because they are sealed. So other than the free first oil change, I get my car back as it is.

It is interesting that dealers do not report back on complaints by customers unless a technician can reproduce the problem.
 

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I had a similar problem on my Land Rover discovery with a similar shaft with universal joint at each end, I removed the shaft and submerged the joints in a Hypoy70 gear oil for a day,
After fitting never had a recurrence of the problem,
 

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I wrote to Hyundai USA corporate headquarters and received a case number. They followed up with two phone calls. BUT, they also said that any warranty work will be dependent on the technician experiencing the sticking steering problem which, of course, they did not do. My problem is intermittent.

It makes no sense to me that the universal joints are responsible. 1) there is almost no articulation as the wheel is turned. 2) If you spray oil on the joints, the oil never gets to the roller bearings which are usually inside the cups and sealed with an o-ring (at least on any car I ever worked on). 3) I see no reason for the u-joint to act up only above a certain speed.

It feels like the power steering is cutting in and out. One thing the dealer said to me when I asked what he would do if he DID demonstrate the sticking. He said they would do a software upgrade or replace the faulty parts. Software upgrade? I asked him to just do the upgrade and he said he needs to demonstrate the problem to do that.

So there you have it. Nice car, except for the intermittent steering problem.

Larry
 
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