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after a meet is had with Watford Ioniq the other week, he gave me a copy of spreadsheet he had created for cost per mile of the EV

I have taken the idea a stage further and used it to create a sheet to compare the costs of the 3 variants

sheet 1 compares the costs, you can enter mpg, cost per litre, cost per KHW (peak / offpeak) and it shows the cost per charge, and cost for 10-100 miles / day in 10 miles steps

the PHEV takes into account the cost of electric and petrol according to the number of miles you do compared to EV mode range

sheet 2 is the mpg figures based on the percentage of EV mode you do

only alter the number s in red and you can see how the 3 models cost you

there are no macros, just basic formula
 

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Thanks @bluecar1 for the spreadsheet. As I was looking at it, I was fascinated by the different price of energy between the UK and Canada. According to my calculation, your off-peak rate is almost 3 times my off peak rate - 0.1£ = $0.17CAD (Google), and currently I'm paying $0.065CAD (weekends and 7:00pm-7:00am on weekdays). All of these figures are per kwh. According to https://www.ovoenergy.com/guides/energy-guides/average-electricity-prices-kwh.html, we have nothing to complain about in Canada with regard to our electricity prices. Having said that, many of us still complain!!!

Anyway, perhaps it should be a new thread, but it would be interesting to see what all of us here are paying for our electric cars in different places. I knew Canadian energy rates were relatively cheap, but I had no idea that they are actually this good.
 

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Thanks @bluecar1 for the spreadsheet. As I was looking at it, I was fascinated by the different price of energy between the UK and Canada. According to my calculation, your off-peak rate is almost 3 times my off peak rate - 0.1£ = $0.17CAD (Google), and currently I'm paying $0.065CAD (weekends and 7:00pm-7:00am on weekdays). All of these figures are per kwh. According to https://www.ovoenergy.com/guides/energy-guides/average-electricity-prices-kwh.html, we have nothing to complain about in Canada with regard to our electricity prices. Having said that, many of us still complain!!!

Anyway, perhaps it should be a new thread, but it would be interesting to see what all of us here are paying for our electric cars in different places. I knew Canadian energy rates were relatively cheap, but I had no idea that they are actually this good.
Don't forget that the actual price is totally different when you add all the extra charges, transportation, debt retiring, etc. My bill is like this: on peak - $14.03, mid peak - $14.96, off peak - $48.21, not bad at all for a month right? But the, you have the delivery of $50.60, regulatory charges $4.34, HST $17.18 and your price is not $0.065/Kwh anymore, it actually comes to $0.148/Kwh. So as you can see, the actual price of electricity is only half of the total bill, better than most places, but not $0.065.
So the price for a full charge is about $4 which would only buy you about 3 liters of gas, so it is a good deal for sure.
 

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@BlueBaron gave me a sheet that only gave EV to std ICE car, so I have taken his sheet and some of the ideas and calcs to produce a easy compare if you are wondering the costs of a plugin compared to EV

it is UK based but should be easy to adapt to local, if there is a demand I could probably produce a internationalised version

I used 65 mpg as that seems to be the average for the hybrid so seemed a good figure to use
 

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@BlueBaron gave me a sheet that only gave EV to std ICE car, so I have taken his sheet and some of the ideas and calcs to produce a easy compare if you are wondering the costs of a plugin compared to EV

it is UK based but should be easy to adapt to local, if there is a demand I could probably produce a internationalised version

I used 65 mpg as that seems to be the average for the hybrid so seemed a good figure to use
I think you may have me mixed up with another member :eek:
 

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bump this thread

as there are some new members looking at the 3 drive trains and wondering how the costs compare, my spreadsheet in the first post give an idea of costs

and by updating the red figures only you can use your own costs (electricity and fuel) so you can get a real idea of your likely costs
 

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Don't forget that the actual price is totally different when you add all the extra charges, transportation, debt retiring, etc. My bill is like this: on peak - $14.03, mid peak - $14.96, off peak - $48.21, not bad at all for a month right? But the, you have the delivery of $50.60, regulatory charges $4.34, HST $17.18 and your price is not $0.065/Kwh anymore, it actually comes to $0.148/Kwh. So as you can see, the actual price of electricity is only half of the total bill, better than most places, but not $0.065.
So the price for a full charge is about $4 which would only buy you about 3 liters of gas, so it is a good deal for sure.
In the UK we also have a rate per kWh, plus a daily rate taken whether any electrons are taken or not. The use rate can be circa 15p per kWh - but then plus a day rate of 25p. But we always ignore that daily rate when relating to car charging because that half of the fee has to be paid anyway for the house to be on the grid. This means that we can calculate the cost per mile based on kWh's used at the rate per kWh. The other costs of being on-grid are irrelevant as they occur anyway.
 

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This is a good comparison, but the PHEV example is flawed. The battery is 8.9kw, but you only have access to 85% of it. The remainder is used in hybrid mode and doesn't get depleted so your 30 miles of range uses 7.556kw of power not 8.9kw. ie You only ever charge a PHEV 7.5kw, not 8.9kw so your phev costs for EV modes are 15% high.
 

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This is a good comparison, but the PHEV example is flawed. The battery is 8.9kw, but you only have access to 85% of it. The remainder is used in hybrid mode and doesn't get depleted so your 30 miles of range uses 7.556kw of power not 8.9kw. ie You only ever charge a PHEV 7.5kw, not 8.9kw so your phev costs for EV modes are 15% high.
My Flo Home X5 reported 8,546 watt-hours transferred to my PHEV on Oct 20, I must have parked it on the extreme low end of its HEV cycle. The temp was 2C that night, is there a battery heater in the PHEV that may have used some of that power?
 

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This is a good comparison, but the PHEV example is flawed. The battery is 8.9kw, but you only have access to 85% of it. The remainder is used in hybrid mode and doesn't get depleted so your 30 miles of range uses 7.556kw of power not 8.9kw. ie You only ever charge a PHEV 7.5kw, not 8.9kw so your phev costs for EV modes are 15% high.
I agree with the premise. But here's hard data from my new EVSE. I now wish I would've documented the percentage of charge left before charging. Suffice to say, each night my PHEV is in HEV mode before I plug-in. While I don't average 8.9, it's pretty close... At least much higher than your 15% reduction.
 

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From the spreadsheet it interesting to roughly calculate how long a plug-in hybrid would take to recoup its initial £7,000 price premium over a standard hybrid, if as a comparison you only did 30 miles each day going to and from work (i.e. running the plug-in on electric only) If you were doing any more miles the payback will take well over 3 years.

if you look at the UK government fuel costs for 10,000 miles per year against each car model it states the plug-in costs more in fuel. :unsure:

link to data.

2020-05-23 (3).png
 

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I wish I knew because 10,000 miles pa must be around 35 miles per day or so and that should fit in well with a 30 mile range for a plug-in.
 
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