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Our electrician came today to install a 240 volt home charging station. He asked how many amps he should pull down, but there's nothing in the manual that helps with that information. We called the dealership, and nobody seemed to know there, either.

We also need a recommendation for a 240 charging cable to buy.

Thanks for any help!
 

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Do you want to hardwire, or install an outlet?

My preference is outlet since it makes it easy to replace the EVSE or take it with you. Your best option then is a NEMA 14-50r. That would be a 50 amp circuit. The difference in cost installing a 30 amp receptacle vs the NEMA 14-50r is trivial.

If you are hardwiring your EVSE, then you need to settle on which one first and then have the electrician wire it to code.

The Ionic has a 7.2 kW onboard charger, which translates to 30 amps. You should future proof though by installing higher capability because you only want to have the electrician come out once, and as I say, the cost of adding extra capacity is trivial.
 

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The Hyundai pulls 30 AMPS to charge, Most chargers are rated at 40 AMPS. A 50 Amp breaker is the answer. (breaker must 20% larger than load) I have a Chargepoint Level 2 which is good, since it provides online charge management and great usage tracking. I also have a $279 Chinese portable 30 AMP plug in unit from Ebay that has worked flawlessly. There are others as well. Check with your local State energy administration to see if they have a rebate on a specific station as well at a discount. The State of Maine has just offered another station for a purchase price for $300, Juicebox, I think. I highly recommend a unit with online tracking, support and control. I know Costco has some good prices as well for Chargepoint units.

32892
 

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2017 Hyundai IONIQ Electric Premium
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The current it draws depends on how fast you want to have the car charged.
Running on 10, 16 or 28 amps this differs.
You can set this,
In the chargepoint (for protection or limits of your house installation),
Or limit this by choice of the limit of the cable (protection of the charging-cable because of its size),
Or setting in the car (drivers last choice to influence charging on the street).

Your model Ioniq with its battery size (kWh) will tell you the time. The power put in (kilo-Watt, Voltage × Amps) versus the time (hour). The maximum power is also limited by the onboard charging module, OBC (6,6kW / 7,2kW).

Also tell the electrician that when running, it will run at full set load for hours at time. Maybe put in an extra size cable for this reason. (To prevent heating) This also prevents voltage drop with longer distances.
 

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Go for a 50A circuit. My EVSE is outside so it is hardwired. As for the charger, either a ChargePoint or JuiceBox. I chose the ChargePoint because of aesthetics.
 

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Red 2019 Ioniq 38 Premium EV
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Here in UK my 32A EVSE got fitted 5 years ago, and charged my Ampera (=Chevy Volt Mk1) at 3.3Kw (14A actual) fine. I got my Ioniq 38 just a month ago, and the first charge tripped the RCD! Current clamp measured 31.5A being drawn by the Ioniq, and the RCDs warm up slightly especially at max current. They also derate the current limit as they warm! 32A at 30C, yes, but only about 30-31 at 40C! After 20 mins, my RCD & Consumer Unit box had warmed enough for the car to max out the reduced limit, and shut down. Fix was to replace RCD with a 40A one. All the other RCBOs etc were already 40A so problem solved.

In theory, EVSEs can deliver anything form 6A up to 32A (or even more, but not often on domestic units) in infinitely-small increments, as there's a variable mark-space square wave low voltage used to tell the car how much to take. So solar-aware EVSEs use this to smoothly alter current, but it can be used to fine-tune a dumb EVSE, if it's got the connection/switch/whatever to allow control. E.g. I've put a Viridian Mainpine ECU into a dumb Rolec, replacing the Rolec ECU that couldn't be altered, and will soon be varying it for solar panel use, but equally I can screw whatever resistor I choose into it to get anything between 6 & 32A if I want. Some people fit a rotary switch with a bank of resistors, v simple & useful.
 
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