Hyundai IONIQ Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Had my first pot hole at high speed take out a tire last night and the mobility kit did not help. Without a spare Hyundai Roadside will only take it to a dealership and rest is history. Luckily I do have a Hyundai spare tire kit that coincidently works perfectly for the Ioniq, but I had never considered using it until last nights eye opener.

I just wanted to poll the EV forum to see if any EV drivers have added a spare wheel to the car and what their experience was on miles/kWh. Per Google research, the tire kit adds 25 lbs (and verified it using my weigh scale :) ) and luckily I weigh a tad below than the US average. So adding a tire kit should not affect me. However I want to see what others exprience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
The weight impact will be neglible to efficiency all other things considered. As you say it's less than the weight of even a small child passenger. I have achieved 5mi/kWh + on a long steady run under 65mph with 2 adults and 2 children plus luggage in mine.Wind direction, air temp, tire pressures and climbing will have far more impact.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
625 Posts
It's not the weight that's the issue for me, it's the lost space.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
It's not the weight that's the issue for me, it's the lost space.
From the 2 responses, I am glad to know that a post sale spare tire addon is not uncommon.

Do you fasten your tire under the provided net, with the jack etc below deck (mobility kit space)?

Just curious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Had my first pot hole at high speed take out a tire last night and the mobility kit did not help. Without a spare Hyundai Roadside will only take it to a dealership and rest is history. Luckily I do have a Hyundai spare tire kit that coincidently works perfectly for the Ioniq, but I had never considered using it until last nights eye opener.

I just wanted to poll the EV forum to see if any EV drivers have added a spare wheel to the car and what their experience was on miles/kWh. Per Google research, the tire kit adds 25 lbs (and verified it using my weigh scale :) ) and luckily I weigh a tad below than the US average. So adding a tire kit should not affect me. However I want to see what others exprience.
What kind of type is your spare?
The standard tyre for the Ioniq EV is the Michelin Energy Saver Plus Tyre. If your spare type is some other type, a drop in performance is expected. The energy saver type gives a boost to economy. Other posters have noticed a performance drop when they have changed their tyres to other types, e.g snow types for winter etc.
I would also be concerned that that a mismatch between types could cause other problems, such as in cornering and emergency braking.
If the spare is on the front ( The Ioniq is front wheel drive ) then I would be very concerned about the potential impact on the electric motor,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
What kind of type is your spare?
The standard tyre for the Ioniq EV is the Michelin Energy Saver Plus Tyre. If your spare type is some other type, a drop in performance is expected. The energy saver type gives a boost to economy. Other posters have noticed a performance drop when they have changed their tyres to other types, e.g snow types for winter etc.
I would also be concerned that that a mismatch between types could cause other problems, such as in cornering and emergency braking.
If the spare is on the front ( The Ioniq is front wheel drive ) then I would be very concerned about the potential impact on the electric motor,
The question was related to carrying around a spare (15" doughnut) tire, expecting a flat and replace it like we do with regular/older cars not changing the tire type on the existing four 16" Tires. I agree the Michelin Energy Saver are ideal for the Ioniq.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
625 Posts
What kind of type is your spare?
The standard tyre for the Ioniq EV is the Michelin Energy Saver Plus Tyre. If your spare type is some other type, a drop in performance is expected. The energy saver type gives a boost to economy. Other posters have noticed a performance drop when they have changed their tyres to other types, e.g snow types for winter etc.
I would also be concerned that that a mismatch between types could cause other problems, such as in cornering and emergency braking.
If the spare is on the front ( The Ioniq is front wheel drive ) then I would be very concerned about the potential impact on the electric motor,
I believe that the OP was referring to an emergency wheel, rather than a spare wheel to be put in rotation with the others. I also believe that were inquiring about the effect the emergency wheel will have when it's in the truck being lugged around with the vehicle and not when installed. As such the emergency wheel will only be installed in an emergency to get you back to help and since they are de-rated and you will be travelling slowly for a relatively short distance (hopefully), there is no detrimental effect on the car at all. Note also that the electric motor still transfers power via a differential and so slightly mismatched tyres on the front (which may affect handling) will not affect the motor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I believe that the OP was referring to an emergency wheel, rather than a spare wheel to be put in rotation with the others. I also believe that were inquiring about the effect the emergency wheel will have when it's in the truck being lugged around with the vehicle and not when installed. As such the emergency wheel will only be installed in an emergency to get you back to help and since they are de-rated and you will be travelling slowly for a relatively short distance (hopefully), there is no detrimental effect on the car at all. Note also that the electric motor still transfers power via a differential and so slightly mismatched tyres on the front (which may affect handling) will not affect the motor.
Yes. For example I am $213 USD poorer because the car had to be towed to the dealership and they replaced the tire. If I had a spare wheel I could knock off $50-$70 USD by getting the spare on and taking the car to a Tire shop :(. $213 educated :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
The question was related to carrying around a spare (15" doughnut) tire, expecting a flat and replace it like we do with regular/older cars not changing the tire type on the existing four 16" Tires. I agree the Michelin Energy Saver are ideal for the Ioniq.
Sorry, I misread your question. My Bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
The Ioniq has TPMS right?

I would think it would take one heck of a pothole to mess up a properly inflated tire. A low tire would be more susceptible to pinch flats or losing the bead.

In probably the 2 dozen flats/leaks I've had in my lifetime, only required a tire/wheel change once. In high school I attempted a 90 degree turn at 45 MPH on gravel and went sideways into a field. It peeled the tire off the bead.

I've gone sideways into a curb, momentarily unseating the bead and breaking a lug bolt... found the source of a leak was a 9mm bullet lodged in tread, and had plenty of flats from punctures. On all but 1, I've been able to get on my way with either a tire plug kit, or one of those fix-a-flat kits. I don't use goo anymore because tire plug kits are so stinkin easy to use. Usually you don't even have to remove the wheel. 5min later and you're back on the road with a permanent fix.

Sidewall damage, a huge gaping hole, or a problem with the bead will require a spare. My guess is that represents 5% of leaks/flats, but that's based on my worthless anecdotal evidence.

The weight of a spare doesn't matter. I bet you'd hardly notice a difference in range with an extra 500 lbs. Aerodynamics is where most of the energy is lost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
625 Posts
Sidewall damage, a huge gaping hole, or a problem with the bead will require a spare. My guess is that represents 5% of leaks/flats, but that's based on my worthless anecdotal evidence.
Been driving for nearly 40 years. Had a hand full of punctures and luckily all in the category of "tire plug kit" repair. As noted above, absolutely requiring a wheel swap to get going is probably a very small percentage of flats. For the IONIQ BEV, I believe that the real reasons Hyundai elected to forego an emergency wheel are: 1) Cost and 2) Space.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
The Ioniq has TPMS right?

I would think it would take one heck of a pothole to mess up a properly inflated tire. A low tire would be more susceptible to pinch flats or losing the bead.

In probably the 2 dozen flats/leaks I've had in my lifetime, only required a tire/wheel change once. In high school I attempted a 90 degree turn at 45 MPH on gravel and went sideways into a field. It peeled the tire off the bead.

I've gone sideways into a curb, momentarily unseating the bead and breaking a lug bolt... found the source of a leak was a 9mm bullet lodged in tread, and had plenty of flats from punctures. On all but 1, I've been able to get on my way with either a tire plug kit, or one of those fix-a-flat kits. I don't use goo anymore because tire plug kits are so stinkin easy to use. Usually you don't even have to remove the wheel. 5min later and you're back on the road with a permanent fix.

Sidewall damage, a huge gaping hole, or a problem with the bead will require a spare. My guess is that represents 5% of leaks/flats, but that's based on my worthless anecdotal evidence.

The weight of a spare doesn't matter. I bet you'd hardly notice a difference in range with an extra 500 lbs. Aerodynamics is where most of the energy is lost.
I have my tires checked once a month @ Costco for 34/36 per the pressure on the door. Unless there was a slow leak or the weather that did not register low on TPS I know I was not low when I flew over that pothole.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
I have my tires checked once a month @ Costco for 34/36 per the pressure on the door. Unless there was a slow leak or the weather that did not register low on TPS I know I was not low when I flew over that pothole.
You were obviously unlucky with that pothole, in my experience the only occasion I've hit some hard enough to pop the tyre has caused considerable additional damage to the wheel and steering and shocks, making the car pretty much undrivable anyway. I guess I've been fortunate in many years of driving though to never have a puncture whilst actually driving, sure I've had them but always noticed before setting off. It's probably a bit of luck but also I am quite fastidious about checking tyre pressures every month or so and before a long journey. Regular checks do identify slow punctures before they actually become an issue and strand you somewhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I usually check tire pressure daily using the dashboard menu on the steering wheel right side.

Don't have access to the car right now for photo. 2018 Hybrid
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Regarding the emergency wheel size. As far as I remember 15" will not fit on the rear due to the electric parking brake. In case of a puncture in a rear tire you will have to mount the spare on front and swap front/rear wheels.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top