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Discussion Starter #81
Andy - lets hope so. ? I do admit it could be worse, but I’m not counting any chickens until the cows come home. or whatever or however the saying goes.
I did wonder why they changed the engine before the rims. The tech ordered 4 rims but as far as I know never replaced them opting for the engine- traction motor assembly instead
 

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IONIQ Electric, SE (w/ CCP) 2018.
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Andy - lets hope so. ? I do admit it could be worse, but I’m not counting any chickens until the cows come home. or whatever or however the saying goes.
I did wonder why they changed the engine before the rims. The tech ordered 4 rims but as far as I know never replaced them opting for the engine- traction motor assembly instead
Well, if you were a technician faced with some cool work on a new type of vehicle with a new drive train system (electric) that you weren't likely to see again for a very long time, what would you do? ;):D
 
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Let it be know that I love my new Ioniq Limited, the car does so many things right. However not ever having experience with the nuances of EV cars. I need to ask a couple of questions.

At exactly 61 mph there is a slight vibration only on the center console and gone at 62-63 mph. The steering wheel is perfect up in the low 70's ( which sometimes traffic demands) you can feel a small vibration in the seat, go a little faster and the car steadies out completely like you were doing 40mph. Is this normal for an EV motor?

I mean the thing is spinning at god know what rpm I can not be in perfect balance throughout it's entire range. The dealer's service tech drove it and noticed the vibration, and wanted to start with taking the tires off and rebalancing. I been around cars for a long time the small mph range of vibrations, and the fact it the vib not in the steering wheel it does not seem like the suspect. So not wanting to spend another 2-3 hours at the dealer I declined that service and thought I put it out to this community. All cars moving vibrate, so being that the car is so quiet and smooth at other ranges, this just might be the "personality" of the car.

Thanks for taking the time for reading and helping- Also the solution is Do not' drive at 61mph :)
I understand your anger. I would feel the same way. I have over 11000 miles on mine and it seems fine. I think the mechanics are incompetent and unable to figure out a simple problem. It seems pretty clear that the problem is of a mechanical nature unrelated to the powertrain (unless the control unit gives the wrong impulses at that particular speed). Either way, they have failed to diagnose it properly. The corporate should work with the dealer to get you another car just like it. Also, terminate that "expert" and hire an intelligent person instead. Good luck to you!
 

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Discussion Starter #85
Day 39- Well everyone here was right. The Hyundai machine is too large to fight. Corporate was not going to bargain with the dealer to put me in a more expensive car, to the manager's credit he did attempt to run that down, amid snickers from the Regional Hyundai Reps. Even if I came up with the extra money there would be no kona. Basically I was given two options. They would take back the car, close out the lease and return $2100. I actually put down $3000 but I get back $2100 because of - MATH. Option 2 is they provide a bit of compensation and they continue with the repair and I take the car back with a full warranty, for the reminder of my lease. I'm seriously considering losing $900 just to be done with The Hyundai Company, The Dealership, and all. I know the first name of at least 10 people at the Dealership. and I'm sure they have quite a few "cute" nicknames for me. My last lease, actually current lease, as I thought I'd save money with the Ioniq, I'm paying for both cars to the lease ends on the Mazda in February. When I return that car I would have been to the Madza dealership 4 times, in 3 years; pickup, 2 services and drop off. GOOD TIMES.

Even swapping the car for a ICE car has its problems because of the incentive that was given with the car. It also makes me wonder that if a 2020 Ioniq was available would actually honor it because the 2020 would not have the same incentive and as such cost more. And as proven by my month long battle, Hyundai does not do more. They just spend another $15 throwing parts and labor at the car. But I'm not going to go down that road again.

I called a couple other lawyers from online they kind of say the same thing that they have to initiate the claim. My wife going to call around to tomorrow to check some local guys.

My wife says that there is no way the car will be reliable or even safe and does not think she'll ride in it. (hopefully that will change).

It's also possible that the transmission or gear unit was not changed yet. I have not been able to contact the car via the app for the day or so. So maybe there is some hope they can still get the car sorted. Will this be the last Hyundai I ever own? 100%. Will I ever recommend the dealer to others? Probably not. Will or has this been my last EV car? I'm having doubts of ever buying a new car again. Do I think anyone at the dealership or Hyundai cares? No, not really. 54 years and still getting schooled by shady salespeople and companies.

sorry for typos and grammar
 

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Day 39- Well everyone here was right. The Hyundai machine is too large to fight. Corporate was not going to bargain with the dealer to put me in a more expensive car, to the manager's credit he did attempt to run that down, amid snickers from the Regional Hyundai Reps. Even if I came up with the extra money there would be no kona. Basically I was given two options. They would take back the car, close out the lease and return $2100. I actually put down $3000 but I get back $2100 because of - MATH. Option 2 is they provide a bit of compensation and they continue with the repair and I take the car back with a full warranty, for the reminder of my lease. I'm seriously considering losing $900 just to be done with The Hyundai Company, The Dealership, and all. I know the first name of at least 10 people at the Dealership. and I'm sure they have quite a few "cute" nicknames for me. My last lease, actually current lease, as I thought I'd save money with the Ioniq, I'm paying for both cars to the lease ends on the Mazda in February. When I return that car I would have been to the Madza dealership 4 times, in 3 years; pickup, 2 services and drop off. GOOD TIMES.

Even swapping the car for a ICE car has its problems because of the incentive that was given with the car. It also makes me wonder that if a 2020 Ioniq was available would actually honor it because the 2020 would not have the same incentive and as such cost more. And as proven by my month long battle, Hyundai does not do more. They just spend another $15 throwing parts and labor at the car. But I'm not going to go down that road again.

I called a couple other lawyers from online they kind of say the same thing that they have to initiate the claim. My wife going to call around to tomorrow to check some local guys.

My wife says that there is no way the car will be reliable or even safe and does not think she'll ride in it. (hopefully that will change).

It's also possible that the transmission or gear unit was not changed yet. I have not been able to contact the car via the app for the day or so. So maybe there is some hope they can still get the car sorted. Will this be the last Hyundai I ever own? 100%. Will I ever recommend the dealer to others? Probably not. Will or has this been my last EV car? I'm having doubts of ever buying a new car again. Do I think anyone at the dealership or Hyundai cares? No, not really. 54 years and still getting schooled by shady salespeople and companies.

sorry for typos and grammar
Unfortunately, the attitude of people who were hired based on certain personal characteristics is as expected. Our country is being changed into something very different. I guarantee you: if you were a "protected" category, the problem would have been solved already with a letter of apology and VIP treatment. Everyone else...
 

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it does sound like you are done with Hyundai, and I understand your decision. You have been through a lot. I will say they did a lot more than I expected. One recent Thought. A guy in my company just leased an Ioniq plug in hybrid, 26-36 mile electric range and gas after that. He got a $114/month lease out the door. I do not know if it was a limited or not.
Anyway, the Lemon law says you should be made 100% whole including registration, payments, fees (rebates) etc. I do not see why you would not get it all back, 100%. You just have to pay for your charger and insurance? Anyway I wish you the best outcome for you.
 

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My wife says that there is no way the car will be reliable or even safe and does not think she'll ride in it.
Not to be critical of your wife, personally, but this is just plain silly. Aside from the fact that she is very likely far less experienced in vehicle design, manufacture and safety than the people who built it and maintain it, any and every vehicle on the road is capable of suffering electrical or mechanical failure that renders it unreliable or unsafe. It can happen at any moment, in any car, for variety of reasons often unimagined to drivers and passengers until it actually happens.

And in reality, with the attention this particular car is getting, the chances of this issue rendering down to something of that kind is actually less, not more.

That's not a reason to keep the car, but it is a strong reason not to let rather more emotive considerations impact on the decision you (and your wife) make regarding it.
 

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Discussion Starter #89
I think I reached a point where the service techs at the dealership are now relying on the corporate tech to fix the car. He's the guy who travels from dealership to dealership. They have not manually started the car in about four days. Apparently if you do not start the car in a four day period the Blue link stops communicating. I think they were also under the impression that the car would be replaced not going back to me. so there was no reason for them to continue with the repair.
 

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After putting up with small steering wheel vibration on my Expedition, I bought used OEM wheel and found the bad wheel by doing one side at the time tire rotation followed by test drive. Once I identified the sucker, I went to shop and swapped the bad wheel. No more vibration.
 

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BTW, another difficult to diagnose vibration source is inner CV joints. This is very specific vibration, as it is torque induced. So when you accelerate with high torque (usually at highway speeds) the CV joint with defect on the bearing surface (small dent caused by carbon inclusions or air bubble in the metal) would lock up causing side-to-side vibration as join is no longer allows movement in and out of the shaft (so it is pushing powertrain left and right as wheel turns). The moment you remove torque (keeping speed constant) - it disappears. Pretty common on Honda Accord, especially V6.
 

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Discussion Starter #92
They though of that and changed both front axles and cv joints. 2nd thing they did after the tires and rims.
 

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Discussion Starter #93 (Edited)
They said they put on a completely different set of rims and tires from another car and had the same results. It's a true mystery.
 

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I think I reached a point where the service techs at the dealership are now relying on the corporate tech to fix the car. He's the guy who travels from dealership to dealership. They have not manually started the car in about four days. Apparently if you do not start the car in a four day period the Blue link stops communicating. I think they were also under the impression that the car would be replaced not going back to me. so there was no reason for them to continue with the repair.
I'm getting the run around from Hyundai on my paint (lots of orange peel aka manufacturer defect, still WELL within the warranty period). I 1,000% can relate to the headache and frustration you're experiencing. After dealing with corporate Hyundai (who kept trying to tell me that their dealerships have ZERO accountability to them, even though one of them damaged my car when "starting the warranty process" and now won't own up to it), and trying to deal with several Hyundai dealerships who keep sending me in circles, I've decided to call it quits on the circles and get a lemon law lawyer. It's already started easing some of my frustration and for the sake of your sanity, I recommend you do the same. If they take it to court, you'll likely get awarded more than the car's value so you'll be able to use it on an alternate car that meets your needs and is still EV with all the fancy gadgets. Whether or not you get a lemon law lawyer is up to you, but it would be worth your time to do so, especially since your car has been in the shop so long and the dealerships have been "helpful" (not really, they've just been somewhat friendly but still can't actually seem to fix the problem). If I were you, I wouldn't accept any compensation from them and I'd just go straight to a lemon law lawyer and let them get me the best deal so I could get a decent replacement... oh, and NOT another Hyundai.
 

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Discussion Starter #95
I drove the car last Thursday and while the vibration was still there I believe is was reduced. I'm really just waiting for the Hyundai Tech to come back for his assessment on whether it's the "way it should be" or if he has any other ideas on how to address the problem. However, I suppose, he is stretched pretty thin as it's been about 3 weeks of I should be there next week.

The dealership has been good about things. It does seem like a strange relationship between dealers and corporate. I guess it works extremely well when the car sale goes right (everyone gets paid), it's when issues arise that the communication breaks down (nobody gets paid). I could be like this by design, or it could be that the systems they have in place are just overloaded. While it has taken a long time (52 days) I honestly believe that everyone wants to do the right thing, but our cars are more of "micro-brew" production wise. Such a limited run of new tech comes with a host new issues that don't quite fit in ICE car problems. I'm not sure if I knew that there were less than 800 Ioniqs in the US, I would of taken the leap to EV ownership. Have you ever seen the first years of corvettes? They were horrible cars. I might have been able to squeak into Tesla (no lease programs in NY). However, the stories of their fit and finish, lack of customer support, horrors of repairs, and crippling over the air updates, pushed me away from them.

I wonder, if anyone remembers the the cars of the late 70's and early 80's when cars were going from carbs to fuel injection and emissions were being added to every car as an after thought. The cars worked but they were miserable to work on and troublesome to tune, and the performance was the worst. Do you think we are in a kind of the same transition?
 

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...It does seem like a strange relationship between dealers and corporate...
The relationship is not one of equals or partnership, and that does make it much harder to deal with residual problems or issues.

Dealerships are almost always totally separate business enterprises from the manufacturers to whom they have contractual obligations. In practice this means - exactly as you said - that when a car sale is made and everyone is happy, both get paid the money they are due from the terms of the contract, and the sales person gets their pay and/or cut of the deal.

When something goes wrong after the sale, there is a tension between the dealership and manufacturer which is usually covered pretty well by the terms of the contract between them, and extends to such things as common warranty repairs, recalls, and the handling of customers, which fall into the remit of the dealership, and extended customer care, long-term fault diagnosis and resolution, etc., which typically falls to corporate, with the dealership acting as handlers and intermediaries up to and including certain milestones in the relationship.

To both dealership and corporate, these arrangements make sense and follow a pretty linear pattern. In most instances, the customer never has any direct relationship with corporate, because the dealership fulfills almost all needs (and makes a tidy profit from non-warranty work on the vehicles, via servicing and maintenance costs). Dealerships make money from charges that flow down to them from corporate from a number of cost centers, defined by the contract (warranty work performed on vehicles sold by another dealership, for example).

In your case, you've likely reached the end, or beyond the end, of the terms defined in the contract which determine who is responsible for resolving your problem and paying the cost of it, so while everyone will stay 'friendly' because they know there's an issue, it's probably less clear what the next steps would be. It's because of this 'grey' area in the relationship that most of the lemon laws were written - they are there, mostly, to protect the consumer when the dealership and corporate no longer have a road-map in their contracts that explain how to proceed with an ongoing problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #97
dealership and corporate no longer have a road-map in their contracts that explain how to proceed with an ongoing problem.
Well it's a good thing that I have Nav in the car and this forum for moral support to guide the way. Andy, you do have a great way of explaining things.
 

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I'm getting the run around from Hyundai on my paint (lots of orange peel aka manufacturer defect, still WELL within the warranty period). I 1,000% can relate to the headache and frustration you're experiencing. After dealing with corporate Hyundai (who kept trying to tell me that their dealerships have ZERO accountability to them, even though one of them damaged my car when "starting the warranty process" and now won't own up to it), and trying to deal with several Hyundai dealerships who keep sending me in circles, I've decided to call it quits on the circles and get a lemon law lawyer. It's already started easing some of my frustration and for the sake of your sanity, I recommend you do the same. If they take it to court, you'll likely get awarded more than the car's value so you'll be able to use it on an alternate car that meets your needs and is still EV with all the fancy gadgets. Whether or not you get a lemon law lawyer is up to you, but it would be worth your time to do so, especially since your car has been in the shop so long and the dealerships have been "helpful" (not really, they've just been somewhat friendly but still can't actually seem to fix the problem). If I were you, I wouldn't accept any compensation from them and I'd just go straight to a lemon law lawyer and let them get me the best deal so I could get a decent replacement... oh, and NOT another Hyundai.
Could you elaborate about your issue? Did your Ioniq develop orange peel after you took delivery? Interesting lemon law claim. I am just trying to figure out how that happened.
 

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I'm not sure I've ever seen a Hyundai without orange peel... Get your paint cut if it bugs you. Or buy a BMW/Benz/Audi/Porsche.
 
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