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Is there a proven way to heat the battery prior to charging? Thinking of several or many max accelerations in the minutes prior to charging? Trying to find ways (proven) to increase the charge rate on cooler/cold days. I am over 90 miles away from the nearest >150kW charger so can't try it myself. I'm looking to travel from the south to Maryland late next week. Please, No Guesses, just tried and true techniques you have used. We RWD drivers need real answers because we will never have a battery heater.
 

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Is there a proven way to heat the battery prior to charging? Thinking of several or many max accelerations in the minutes prior to charging? Trying to find ways (proven) to increase the charge rate on cooler/cold days. I am over 90 miles away from the nearest >150kW charger so can't try it myself. I'm looking to travel from the south to Maryland late next week. Please, No Guesses, just tried and true techniques you have used. We RWD drivers need real answers because we will never have a battery heater.
If you don’t have battery preconditioning, I might say “no way to heat the battery”.
Even if the battery is warm right after you leave your house, when you drive your car, battery temperature will drop. It will be totally outside temperature. You need to have at least 65 degree above to keep battery temperature. I just drove 1200 miles (600 miles with 24-35F degree temperature and 600 miles with 55-62 degree temperature:today). I used OBD throughout my 600 mile trip and monitor battery temperature today. When I charged one of sessions, battery temperature reached 100.4 degree then I heard sound of fan. Next charging session was 100 miles away, unfortunately, when I arrived next charger, battery was below 80 degree because of outside temperature was 60 degree. I have not checked exact number but I will post my second experience with detail numbers soon.

when I traveled the first tripwith cold temperature (24-35F condition).
Only got 70kw (beginning p) then gradually increased around 44%. Pull 100kw -135kw peak. 350kw charger will not give any benefit.
you can check detail numbers here.
 

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Nope. The inherent heat efficiency of the 800V architecture means that the battery simply won't get hot enough in cold ambient temperatures through driving, no matter how energetically you try things like staged accelerations prior to arrival at the charger. The only way I've found to get half-decent charging speeds in winter (Scotland, so still mild by continental standards) is to make sure I arrive at the charger with a low state of charge (10-20%). Bear with the slow initial charging speeds until the battery gets up to temperature and then you'll have a decent spate of higher charging speeds before tailing off again once over 80-85%.
 

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Nope. The inherent heat efficiency of the 800V architecture means that the battery simply won't get hot enough in cold ambient temperatures through driving, no matter how energetically you try things like staged accelerations prior to arrival at the charger. The only way I've found to get half-decent charging speeds in winter (Scotland, so still mild by continental standards) is to make sure I arrive at the charger with a low state of charge (10-20%). Bear with the slow initial charging speeds until the battery gets up to temperature and then you'll have a decent spate of higher charging speeds before tailing off again once over 80-85%.
This is true.
I tried yesterday. Put on the sport mode then drove actively but battery temperature did not do anything. I rarely put on sport mode and my wife always wanted smooth riding but she said okay if I can raise battery temperature. She monitored battery temperature but she said nah…. I tested about 10miles.
 

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This is true.
I tried yesterday. Put on the sport mode then drove actively but battery temperature did not do anything. I rarely put on sport mode and my wife always wanted smooth riding but she said okay if I can raise battery temperature. She monitored battery temperature but she said nah…. I tested about 10miles.
Sounds like a fun 10 miles.... I have to be alone in the car for the splash of red on my screen to happen ;)
 

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Is there a proven way to heat the battery prior to charging? Thinking of several or many max accelerations in the minutes prior to charging? Trying to find ways (proven) to increase the charge rate on cooler/cold days. I am over 90 miles away from the nearest >150kW charger so can't try it myself. I'm looking to travel from the south to Maryland late next week. Please, No Guesses, just tried and true techniques you have used. We RWD drivers need real answers because we will never have a battery heater.
The whole process is controlled by the car’s battery management system that protects and optimizes the performance of the battery cells.
Here are six tips on how to get the best performance out of your EV as the winter months quickly approach.
1. Park your car in a garage if possible
Not everyone has a garage, but if you’ve got one, put your EV in it. (And if it’s full of stuff, then clean it out – your car needs it.)
Keeping your vehicle inside during winter can make a difference in its battery performance. The warmth of the garage will help your car hold battery charge for longer and charge more quickly.
Also, if you’re out and need to park, if there’s a choice between parking outdoors or in a parking garage, go for the latter.
2. Warm up your car in the morning
Most EVs come with apps that allow you to heat up your car in advance of departure. If you turn on your car’s heating before you leave the house, it will heat up the cabin to your desired temperature and also warm up the battery to aid performance.
Most people charge their cars at home overnight. If the car is still plugged in when you start heating it in the morning, then the battery’s charge won’t be tapped.
3. Don’t let the battery charge get too low
When it’s really cold, the car’s battery management system reserves a certain percentage of the battery capacity – generally about 15-20% – in order to heat the battery up.
So if you usually keep your battery charged above 15-20%, and ideally a minimum of 50%, then you will have a nice margin to keep your car’s performance as optimized as possible.
4. Heat the passenger, not the car
Since EVs of course don’t have an internal combustion engine, there’s little additional waste heat that helps to warm the passenger cabin.
However, blasting the heat when it’s cold can drain your EV’s battery and reduce its range. Try restricting heating to just the driver, whether it’s by turning air vents on or off, or controlling seat or steering wheel heating settings. It consumes less electricity than heating the whole car.
5. Inflate your tires
As the temperature drops, the air in your tires contracts and the pressure falls. Regularly check your tires’ pressure in order to maximize winter range. You want your car to drive with as little resistance as possible.
Also, if you live somewhere that gets a lot of snow, you’ll probably want to consider putting on winter tires. You can read more about that here, if you’re a Tesla Model 3 driver, for example.
6. Use Eco-Mode
Most EVs have a form of “eco-mode,” in which you can boost mileage and reduce power consumption by limiting the energy supplied to the driving motor and cabin heaters. You may accelerate more slowly, but this can also make driving safer in icy or snowy conditions.
 
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