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I'm having to charge at home then rapid charge for work (uber driver) 6 days a week. I'm looking to keep the car for 100000 miles is this okay or should I switch for a higher range car
 

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2019 PHEV Ultimate
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I don't think it's a big deal. The two things that knock the most life out of batteries are:

1) Overheating, and the Ioniq has decent active cooling (forced air via fans in the original, liquid cooling in the 2020 and up models).
2) Being left sitting at 100% for a long period of time, and you'll be running it down quite regularly after every charge.

If it were my car I wouldn't be worried.
 
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IONIQ Electric, SE (w/ CCP) 2018.
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The MY 2017's to 2019's have proven to have excellent batteries showing little to no degradation. Mine just about to clock over to 110k km and still no range loss.

Battery degradation is a function of time (even if you don't use it), charge cycles and over heating. Since you'll be logging miles so quickly, any increased degradation due to the Fast Charging will be mitigated by the fact that that the battery is still relatively young. Do you have a 28 kWh IONIQ or the 38 kWh version. The liquid cooling on the MY2020 (and up) will be a big help to remove heat build up since it has liquid thermal battery management.
 

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I'm having to charge at home then rapid charge for work (uber driver) 6 days a week. I'm looking to keep the car for 100000 miles is this okay or should I switch for a higher range car
You need to consider your region. eg. hot weather regions like california are different then more moderate climates.
Also be aware that:
1/ fastcharging works till ca. 77-80% SoC, above it slows down significantly
2/ the 38kWh Ioniq is a lot slower in fastcharging then the 28kWh
 
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