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Hyundai has launched three variants under the Ioniq nameplate and Pocket-lint was able to get their hands on the full electric model for testing.

While they don’t think the Ioniq is as desirable as the BMW i3, they still gave it a rating of four stars out of five because the base trim comes loaded with technology, the drive and interior was comfortable and it’s just good value for the amount you’re paying.

The Design (Exterior And Interior)

To make it as aerodynamic and efficient as possible, the traditional grille was replaced by a silver panel which allows it to roam around without creating too much air turbulence. The exact drag coefficient for the electric model wasn’t revealed but it should be the same if not better than 0.24Cd which is what its hybrid counterpart got. They could have done something similar to Tesla with a seamless bumper but that would have raised the base price.
As for the interior, some areas are covered with glossy hard commonly used in affordable cars plastic like the aircon controls and the plastic trim on the doors or dash may not be the best but, you can’t really compare it to an i3. Also, it isn’t all bad since it does have leather arm rests and steering wheel, comfortable seats that are heated in the front, and a reasonable trunk.



How It Drives

Power is instantly delivered from the 120bhp electric motor that can push out 295Nm torque. It won’t push drivers into their seats but it’s still peppy and good enough to move you from 0 to 62mph in 10.2-seconds. In sport mode, that time is shaved down to 9.9 seconds and you’ll be sitting in a relatively silent cabin while accelerating.

What could draw potential Prius buyers towards the Ioniq is its regenerative braking feature that can be adjusted via paddles to increase or decrease the friction that is applied when your foot is lifted from the gas pedal. In a manual car, those shifters would change gears and in the Ioniq it will change the regenerative levels with the highest level noticeablty slowing down the car. This could make the braking feel jerky but that should smooth out once you’re used to it.

The Range

Hyundai claims that that Ioniq has a 174 mile range when you’re using 11.5kWh per 100km. Granted, Pocket-lint had the Ioniq for a short amount of time so this isn’t exactly a long term real world figure but, they used 13.4kWh per 100km.

Charging

For longer road trips, the Ioniq can be charged from a domestic wall socket (could take 10-12 hours), fast-charging wall box (4-6 hours), and a 50kW CCS public charger and that should get it up to 80% in around 33 minutes. For better energy consumption planning, the center infotainment screen will show drivers where the electricity is going and how much. Also, you can set the charging time for off-peak hours and the cabin can be set to cool or heat the car while it’s plugged in.



Loaded With Technology

As we said earlier, the Ioniq comes loaded with tech that you would be hard pressed to find in similarly priced electric vehicles. Coming in only two trims, Premium and Premium SE, the Ioniq EV’s Premium trim comes standard with these features; dual-zone aircon, automatic emergency braking, lane keep assistance, rear parking sensors and rear camera, auto headlights and wipers, Bluetooth, 8-inch central touch display with satnav and TomTom Live services, Android Auto nad Apple CarPlay, heated front seats, Infinity sound system with subwoofer, auto dimming rear mirror, wireless phone charging, and keyless entry. For the SE trim, you’ll get additional leather seats with a cooling feature, blind spot detection, etc.

Overall, the Ioniq is a great electric vehicle for an affordable price and they come with a standard 5-year warranty along with a 8 year/125,000 mile battery warranty.
 

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I was just about to post the same thing ! But obviously, you guys do a better job at this !

Nonetheless, I don't see how they can call this less desirable than the BMW i3. The i3 is really unappealing in my opinion. The interior is pretty nice but I think that's as far as I'll go to say with that
 

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The i3 comes with a premium price tag and it's really not that great looking either. Bet you won't get an i3 with the same tech that a standard Inoniq is equipped with unless you pay for each feature.
 

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there is a fair bit of tech in the i3, but the inside is a bit quirky, no dash as such


but one option is good, the range extender,
The optional Range Extender can increase the range of the BMW i3 in COMFORT Mode from up to 125 miles to a total of 206 miles. The small, rear-mounted, quiet two-cylinder petrol engine powers a generator that maintains the charge of the battery at a constant level, so that the BMW i3 can continue to drive electrically. It switches on automatically when the battery level is low.

that is a useful option
 

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That will help a lot on road trips to get you to where you can charge up again depending on where you're going and how long the stops are.


Even good for those cross town commutes. At least BMW is thinking ahead.
 
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