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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone had experience using a portable plug-in kWh usage monitor with their PHEV or EV?

I love Fuelly for keeping track of my gasoline usage, but only just discovered Spritmonitor which tracks both my gasoline plus my plug-in electricity charges. :)

MPG and Cost Calculator and Tracker - Spritmonitor.de
MPG and Cost Calculator and Tracker. Spritmonitor.de calculates your car's gas mileage and helps to manage the vehicle's costs. After a free registration, you will be able to use all functions, e.g. include an icon in bulletin boards, analyse costs or enter fuelings with your smartphone.
www.spritmonitor.de

I mainly charge at home with my Level 1 - 120 volt Emergency/Granny Charger and have no direct way of measuring individual charges. However, a portable kWh monitor would connect in-line between my 120 Volt receptacle & charger cord to give me the necessary info to add to the Spritmonitor app.

For the odd time I do charge away from home on a commercial charger I should be able to either guesstimate or record kWh and cost ($0.00 so far) from the meter itself, right? I've never paid attention to kWh in the 3-4 times I have commercially charged up till now.

My question is, has anyone had experience with a portable Kilowatt Electricity Monitor or a variation to this one I found on Amazon.ca?

Poniie PN2000 Plug-in Kilowatt Electricity Usage Monitor Electrical Power Consumption Watt Meter Tester w/Extension Cord, Meter Sockets - Amazon Canada

Feedback on Spritmonitor would certainly be appreciated as well.
 

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I use a same type of reader to measure usage sometimes when I use power at a friend's house to tell the amount drawn energy. This works fine. Since max current is about 16Amp and the L1 charger draws lower current this should be no problem.
For every day usage I wouldn't recommend any devices or extra connections in between because of the high current running continuesly with the full EV. It's just extra risk.
 

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I agree with Patrick on not having the too many connections and would suggest you check how warm they are getting each week. While the meter is rated at a maximum of 16A, it probably should not be used at that level for long periods but may be OK for lower levels. The supplied charge cable (ICCB/grannie) does have a cut out based on a temperature sensor in the plug pushed into your mains socket.

I have an 60A rated meter built into the Metal Consumer Unit that supplies my Podpoint charger and UK mains outlet used to charge the car. It displays voltage, Amperage, kilowatt and accumulative power kWh. This since April19 is keeping track of all my home charges... Sadly, I take a reading each week ;). Podpoint also supply me with a monthly report on use of their chargers elsewhere and through the home podpoint. I use the mains outlet to charge matching my solar excess. I can calculate how much free solar power I've used.
 
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Good info so far gentlemen, thank you for your input. (y)
I do and will continue to monitor and be cautious as to heat build-up, however so far, so good the past year and a half now on my 25 year old house wiring. All receptacles & fixtures have been replaced plus the main panel & circuits professionally inspected & tested just 2 years ago.
Any other experience or input is welcome as well. So far I'm feeling quite positive about trying this unit.
 
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I have a plug in electricity usage monitor, like the one you referenced on Amazon. I got mine a couple months after getting the phev because I was curious about the charging amps and total kWh, etc. This is the one I got, also found on Amazon:


I don't use mine all the time because I don't track my usage. But it's nice to see the data occasionally. (Last two full charges have been 8.9 and 9.1 kWh).

And it has helped me discover a couple times that the car's charging settings have gotten reset somehow. I use the granny charger with a standard US 120 V outlet. I like to charge at medium rate so I set my charge rate to medium using the car setup screens (this way I don't have to push the button on the charge cable unit each time). At medium rate the car charges at 9 amps. But a couple times I have seen from the usage monitor that the charging current is 12 amps. That alerts me that the car has 'forgotten' the setting and I have to go into the car setup screen and re-select medium rate.

Someday I may get a fancy level 2 charger. But for now I am happy with this unit. It is relatively inexpensive and satisfies my curiosity.
 

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I have a plug in electricity usage monitor, like the one you referenced on Amazon. I got mine a couple months after getting the phev because I was curious about the charging amps and total kWh, etc. This is the one I got, also found on Amazon:


I don't use mine all the time because I don't track my usage. But it's nice to see the data occasionally. (Last two full charges have been 8.9 and 9.1 kWh).

And it has helped me discover a couple times that the car's charging settings have gotten reset somehow. I use the granny charger with a standard US 120 V outlet. I like to charge at medium rate so I set my charge rate to medium using the car setup screens (this way I don't have to push the button on the charge cable unit each time). At medium rate the car charges at 9 amps. But a couple times I have seen from the usage monitor that the charging current is 12 amps. That alerts me that the car has 'forgotten' the setting and I have to go into the car setup screen and re-select medium rate.

Someday I may get a fancy level 2 charger. But for now I am happy with this unit. It is relatively inexpensive and satisfies my curiosity.
Thanks @Jonboy, I will bear all that in mind. I may dial my granny charger back to Medium/8 amps as you have. Did you make this choice because of a wiring load concern or a potential benefit from even slower charging or some other factor? I really only need the overnight period to recharge, so whether it's 7 or even 10-12 hours makes little difference to me.

It has occurred to me that since I charge at the default setting of High/12 Amps and I'm usually charging a consistent 12-15% remaining battery, once I do that a few times and average the kWh. I could then just chart an averaged figure in Spritmonitor.

But it would also be good (and a bit of fun) to compare from time to time and also measure shorter charge-ups.

I'm thinking that you must have some very good insights & techniques to average 168mpg with your PHEV and several tanks even higher. Do you charge both at home and at work? Your worst tank's MPG is only a little less than my average MPG! If you ever wanted to share any tips, I'd be happy to listen. ;)
 

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I love Fuelly for keeping track of my gasoline usage, but only just discovered Spritmonitor which tracks both my gasoline plus my plug-in electricity charges. :)
I started using the Fuelio app when I got my Ioniq PHEV because it can also track both gas and electricity, but quickly realized I had no desire to punch data into it every morning so disabled the Bi-fuel setting in the vehicle profile. Flo's web site lets me download my history as an .xlsx file which I could use to back-fill Fuelio should I ever change my mind, but that's solidly in the 'feels too much like work' category.
 
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All good to know @KevinT!
I'll have a look at Fuelio too, since I really am interested in getting a truer sense of my actual mileage figures from both of my energy sources.
 

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Thanks @Jonboy, I will bear all that in mind. I may dial my granny charger back to Medium/8 amps as you have. Did you make this choice because of a wiring load concern or a potential benefit from even slower charging or some other factor? I really only need the overnight period to recharge, so whether it's 7 or even 10-12 hours makes little difference to me.

It has occurred to me that since I charge at the default setting of High/12 Amps and I'm usually charging a consistent 12-15% remaining battery, once I do that a few times and average the kWh. I could then just chart an averaged figure in Spritmonitor.

But it would also be good (and a bit of fun) to compare from time to time and also measure shorter charge-ups.

I'm thinking that you must have some very good insights & techniques to average 168mpg with your PHEV and several tanks even higher. Do you charge both at home and at work? Your worst tank's MPG is only a little less than my average MPG! If you ever wanted to share any tips, I'd be happy to listen. ;)
From what I have read about batteries, I think charging at a slower rate may help prolong the life of the battery. I plan to keep this car for a long time so I decided to charge at medium. And like you, I charge overnight, so it makes no difference to me if it takes an extra two hours.

I think the key to my average mpg is just that my workday commute is 8 miles round trip. So most of my miles are in EV mode. Last winter was the exception. I didn't want to charge when the temp was below freezing (again to try and prolong the life of the battery) so I drove a couple cold months in HEV mode. But this winter I have a new garage so I don't park outside anymore and I have been charging regularly. And this winter has been so mild here that I have not needed the ICE heat much at all yet. Wish I had some real tips to share and help out. But really the Ioniq phev just fits my driving pattern nicely.

Let us know if you decide to use SpiritMonitor or Fuelio and how you like it compared to Fuelly. Thanks.
 

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From what I have read about batteries, I think charging at a slower rate may help prolong the life of the battery.
Slower is a relative term. When reading about lithium ION batteries you'll often see talk of C rates, a measure of charge rate versus battery capacity. If you have a 28 kWh battery then a 28 kW charge rate would be considered 1C, while charging at 60 kW would be 2.14C (rate / capacity = C). In terms of the effect on battery life anything above 0.8C speeds degradation, whereas below that you're generally safe unless the battery is below freezing.

As long as your garage stays above the freezing point (as mine does down to about a -15°C outside temp) then even the highest rate our PHEVs will take from a Level 2 charger is safe, 3.5 kW / 8.9 kWh = 0.39C. In fact the rate the battery sees is lower due to losses in the charger (no electric circuit comes without losses, ever) and it actually only gets 3.2 kW, so 0.36C. Charge away!
 

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That makes sense. I remember some of that from my days charging LiPo batteries with RC helicopters. But I never actually calculated the C rate of the Ioniq PHEV. So thanks for sharing that.

It's encouraging that the PHEV is designed to charge at reasonable rates for long term use. And that helps explain how Hyundai can offer a long warranty on the battery.
 

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Has anyone had experience using a portable plug-in kWh usage monitor with their PHEV or EV?

I love Fuelly for keeping track of my gasoline usage, but only just discovered Spritmonitor which tracks both my gasoline plus my plug-in electricity charges. :)

MPG and Cost Calculator and Tracker - Spritmonitor.de
MPG and Cost Calculator and Tracker. Spritmonitor.de calculates your car's gas mileage and helps to manage the vehicle's costs. After a free registration, you will be able to use all functions, e.g. include an icon in bulletin boards, analyse costs or enter fuelings with your smartphone.
www.spritmonitor.de

I mainly charge at home with my Level 1 - 120 volt Emergency/Granny Charger and have no direct way of measuring individual charges. However, a portable kWh monitor would connect in-line between my 120 Volt receptacle & charger cord to give me the necessary info to add to the Spritmonitor app.

For the odd time I do charge away from home on a commercial charger I should be able to either guesstimate or record kWh and cost ($0.00 so far) from the meter itself, right? I've never paid attention to kWh in the 3-4 times I have commercially charged up till now.

My question is, has anyone had experience with a portable Kilowatt Electricity Monitor or a variation to this one I found on Amazon.ca?

Poniie PN2000 Plug-in Kilowatt Electricity Usage Monitor Electrical Power Consumption Watt Meter Tester w/Extension Cord, Meter Sockets - Amazon Canada

Feedback on Spritmonitor would certainly be appreciated as well.
I have used a similar plug in power meter but the display on the one I have is just down right awful.
I also have some Alexa switched sockets that have an App to monitor the current used, BEWARE these work but the plug gets very hot at the full rated draw of a granny charger so do not use.
At last I have got my Myenergi Zappi charging point installed and at least can now read how much charge the car has taken. As I have solar PV I can also see what percentage of Grid and solar or economy tariff the car has used to charge.
Annoying features are.
The Zappi does not as yet have in the phone APP a way to download data directly to a spreadsheet, "its coming."
The BlueLink Ioniq APP does not show the cumulative miles or kilometres driven, only the month?? So I have to open the door of the car to get the mileage.
I am just putting together a home brew current monitor for the granny charger that will take the full 13amp load and give me a kWh charge value and cost and cumulative charge and the cumulative cost.
This by rights should be included in the granny charger so that you could pay relatives or good Samaritans who let you use their outlet.
There is a lot of room for second service add ons in the EV world
 

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I don't use mine all the time because I don't track my usage. But it's nice to see the data occasionally. (Last two full charges have been 8.9 and 9.1 kWh).
Question regarding your observation above. If our PHEV battery capacity size is 8.9kwh, and a hybrid system only uses around 80% of the full capacity typically, then how could the battery charge 8.9, or even a higher 9.1kwh?
I am probably missing something...?
Thanks.

I based my EV cost calculations on 80% x 8.9kwh of charging, and our local cost of electricity which is 22c/kwh.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I am just putting together a home brew current monitor for the granny charger that will take the full 13amp load and give me a kWh charge value and cost and cumulative charge and the cumulative cost.
This by rights should be included in the granny charger so that you could pay relatives or good Samaritans who let you use their outlet.
There is a lot of room for second service add ons in the EV world
Thanks for your input @Crusty.
Good luck with your monitor & hoping to hear more about your final product when completed. :)
 

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Question regarding your observation above. If our PHEV battery capacity size is 8.9kwh, and a hybrid system only uses around 80% of the full capacity typically, then how could the battery charge 8.9, or even a higher 9.1kwh?
The 8.9 kWh recorded by the meter is how much went into the car, but since charger efficiency isn't 100% the actual amount going into the battery will be less.

My Flo charger consistently reports 14.6A during a charge session, which assuming 240V is a 3.5 kW charge rate (I really wish Flo would show me the voltage and kW rate as well!) Torque Pro shows me the battery voltage and current from the OBD2 port which change as the voltage rises with the state of charge, but they fairly consistently multiply out to about 3.15 kW. That translates to a charger efficiency of 90%, so if the meter shows 8.9 kWh charged then it's really only 8 kWh that went into the battery.

Edit to add: Of course a battery is not 100% efficient either, so even if 8 kWh went from the charger into the battery the actual amount stored will be less, and of course it's not 100% efficient coming back out either. Any number you think you know will be wrong in the end, because physics.
 
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Thanks Patrick for your input!

My wife and I are renters of 'mother-in-law' quarters on the side of a friends home. Our rent covers our utilities too. However, since I bought the PHEV, I have not wanted to charge the car at home without a way to measure how much power we're drawing so we can contribute additional funds each month to cover the cost. I went with the Poniie PN2000 (linked in a previous post on this thread) and was a bit concerned it might fail before too long.

Like others here, I have no need for quick charging as all charging will occur overnight. So I'm going with the 'granny' mode slow charging and hoping this meter does the trick. Just ordered it today. Appreciate the insights all you fine folks bring to this newbie PHEV owner.
 
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