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Hey @yticolev, what is your advice for optimal 12 volt battery life ?
I was wondering what will happen if I will drive car in EV mode for 2 weeks for example (charging from the wall) but it will still using some power for interior electronics ? Does recurperation also charges 12v or it is charges from PHEV battery ?
 

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There is some mixed opinions, but it doesn't seem that the 12 volt battery charges while plugged in. It does charge while driving (or car "on") from the traction battery via a DC/DC converter. It may also do this from a user option called something like battery saver plus. Either way it does this intermittently triggered by low voltage. Something on the order of 12.8 volts is low and triggers a charging event. This is damaging for lead acid batteries and every EV forum has reports of early failure. The cure for those affected is regular use of a smart trickle charger, at least once a month. Such devices can reverse any battery damage and users report more normal battery life of 3 plus years. Seems a bit crazy to have to do this on a new car. But that's life.

There are some owners who don't seem to be affected. For example, the 2016/7 HEV models that were equipped with lead acid batteries haven't reported problems here that I've read. Not all owners post here of course and owners who say have a failure after say 2 years and have the battery replaced under warranty (depending on separate battery warranty and country) may not consider that unusual and seek help online.
 

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Alright, I see.
If battery saver option is enabled car automatically will charge 12volt battery in case of low voltage which will damage lead acid battery faster.

But what about if car is On or driving in EV mode - will it charge it only when low volts or it will work like regular car generator ?

Also what if engine is running (sports mode) for some time every week or two - I guess it will also charge the 12v battery and not wait until its volts dropped too much ?
 

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My digital multi meter does not have "mixed opinions". Please go and try a multimeter on your PHEV during CHARGING or the car being ON or ON and driving (in EV or HEV or Sport modes.) the Aux 12V battery is being charged.

The Aux lead acid 12V battery shows 12.0(or less) to 12.6 when the CAR IS OFF and you have the trunk tailgate open and it's light is on.
If the battery shows more than the ABOVE 12.6V, then the battery has a higher voltage(say 13.5-14V) being applied to it... So it is being charged and will take a current and charge itself.

1 - Car ON - The PHEV charges the Aux 12V battery when the car is ON and ON + driving. It shows approx 14V at the battery. (difficult while driving to get in the boot but can be seen on the 12V ports next to the phone charger pad. )
(if you power the car off but leave the radio on... The car warns you to switch it back ON.)

2 - CAR CHARGING - When the car is plugged in and STILL CHARGING some of the car systems are ON... When you open the door it shows you on the dashboard how long to 100% traction battery level. The battery shows around 13. 5V during traction battery charging.

(again the Aux 12V battery has to be good for the traction battery charge to start)

3 - Aux Battery Saver+ TICK - if this feature is set to ON the car will charge the Aux 12V battery from the traction battery if the level of the 12V gets low because the car has not been ON or driven or charged much. It shows you that it has worked as a warning... There is a limit to how many times this will happen... Generally, if the traction battery is low it will stop working.

Access to feature setting. Page through dash menu... Range/destination/tire pressure/USER SETTINGS... choose user settings... Next choose Other Features, then Aux Battery Saver+.
The default setting of this feature has recently changed to TICK / On. It had been OFF on early models.

The Aux 12V lead acid battery gets a lot of stick on here as it is very frustrating to have to open the car with the manual key and climb into the trunk to charge the 12V battery.

Hyundai made the 12V battery small as it does not need to start the ICE and they put the above systems in place to keep it charged. Are these systems enough? YES for most drivers. No for some who drive less or infrequently. Only a few batteries have been changed.

User errors and car faults - If you sit in the car with the radio or headlights on and car off, leave a map light on overnight, faulty door lock buttons, don't close the tailgate fully(faulty switch and light on), keys too near car?, leave you car for weeks/months without driving or it being ON, or charging the traction battery then the 12V battery will give up.

My set up to help hyundai's. A small detachable(but always connected) solar panel on parcel shelf hooked up to 12V battery. I very occasionally charge the battery using a smart charger. Used twice during lockdown.
 
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I don't have a multimeter or a PHEV to test it on. However, charging voltage is above 14 volts. If your multimeter is not showing that (you haven't reported it in your post), the DC/DC converter is not actively charging your battery. 12 volts static (which you do report) is certain to be damaging to the battery.

Out of curiosity, do you have a theory on why so many 12 volt batteries in EVs including the Ioniq PHEV fail prematurely? ICE vehicles with alternators do not have the same magnitude of issues.
 

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Evidence - need to add to your visual experience... otherwise it didn't happen. Please pop down to a dealer willing to charge a PHEV while you watch. Buy a $5 multimeter first. Hint - Set it to the 20V range, red is +VE and black is - ve.

I did report the battery is showing around 13.5V when charging and approx. 14V when the car is ON or driving. Why say I didn't? Ah just messing? Again reread my post. Dealer visit req'd. Didnt see it.

Basic physics. Apply 12.8V with jump leads to a battery showing 12.6V battery and it will take a charge. No need for 14V but it would help. Did you miss that episode of the big bang theory. ;)

"12 volts static (which you do report) is certain to be damaging to the battery." What are you talking about? Yes, 11.9V to 12.6V is quite low but it is normal for a battery in a car not running or on a shelf. Check the shelves at home depot with your new multimeter.

A Theory on BEV and PHEV suspected Aux battery failure without an ICE with an alternator. Yes, I shouldn't have added that paragraph above. My bad. I tried to list all the reasons the 12V battery goes flat. Dodgy battery is seldom. Hyundai tried and were 99% successful. Batteries replaced divided by Forum members. One ioniq had 2 batteries changed... That's bad diagnosis of the drain and just fixing the symptom.

BTW batteries on ice cars fail too. The warrenty is only 2 years. Failliure is expected.

And your theory... Yes, I asked.

The Aux battery Saver+ only works when the car is off and tells you when the car is switched on again.

Covid19 and 12V charging during traction battery charging are myths. Whatever you want to believe, dude (Mr president). Enjoy testing batteries. Stay clear of the traction battery.
Stay safe. :)
 

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BTW batteries on ice cars fail too. The warrenty is only 2 years. Failliure is expected.
Warranty on premium batteries is usually 48 months. Mine have always lasted 5 years plus in ICE cars. If 2 years is all that you expect, you won't be disappointed then. Still no theory then on difference between battery life in ICE versus EV cars? You don't need a voltmeter to read system voltage, an OBD reader will do it and even log it with a good app. Do that and post the log for us.
 

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While I don't have a direct measurement I suspect that phev charging also charges the 12v battery. The reason for this is there have been several occasions where the battery has gone dead for some reason and required me breaking out my portable 12v battery to jump start (AC charging doesn't work if the 12v is dead) . After doing this I usually plug into the 240v to charge and the car seems to be be subsequently good as far as the 12v goes for at least a few days. If the ac didn't charge the battery I don't think this would have happened.
 

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My multimeter is showing 14,4v while plugged in and charging and there are photos of that somewhere in this forum. Both my Ioniqs (EV and PHEV) charge 12v battery while charging.
Ioniq PHEV and EV battery degradation after 3 years of use is practically non existent. They may be eating away a buffer in the battery capacity, but time so far does not reflect their range.
 

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Warranty on premium batteries is usually 48 months. Mine have always lasted 5 years plus in ICE cars. If 2 years is all that you expect, you won't be disappointed then. Still no theory then on difference between battery life in ICE versus EV cars? You don't need a voltmeter to read system voltage, an OBD reader will do it and even log it with a good app. Do that and post the log for us.
Since when has the word premium ever been associated with the hyundai 12V battery? That is just the dealer price, certainly not the output. Stop moving the goalposts by adding extra words like premium and read the words that I wrote. The Hyundai warrenty for the Aux 12V battery for only 2 years. It is therefore not a premium battery although the price might be so. 2 years is not what I expect its life to be. Mine is 3 years old and is being monitored.

Expectations - My RX-8 is about to get its 2nd battery in 13 years. eg 6+ years for a car that is used for 2000 miles per annum.

I gave you a theory in my original post. Forum members with a drained battery come on here having just had their worst experience ever. How do you get into the car to read the manual on how to access the car via the key and then get into the boot to charge the battery. Frustration at the battery does not mean it was at fault. Its symptoms eg the drain was the problem. Read the forum entries fully.

The hyundai 12V battery does not have the stress of turning the engine, so should last longer but is approx. half the normal size. I left you a list of all the issues that cause problems for the battery but are not the batteries fault. Again still not got your readers checked. New prescription perhaps? Do you have Specsavers across the pond?

It is people like you that plug an odb2 DEVICE, if you had one, into their phev ioniq, if you had one, that will find their battery drained by that said odb2 device, the very next morning.

Again you are attempting to move the goal posts. The voltage we want to understand is the static voltage or the voltage at the battery, not the system voltage. The static voltage or loss there of tells the car whether it can open the locks or not or start the car. The system voltage is mute.

We all know the system voltage causes the 12V battery to take a charge during the car being ON and the traction battery being charged. Some need to see it for themselves.

Still not arranged a Dealer visit yet?

You truly have misunderstood how an ODB2 device works. No surprise there. It needs the car to be ON to communicate with the system, which will then not show the static range of voltages 11.9V-12.6V, which is the important value.

I am using an ODB2 device that has a power button and will therefore not cause the drain that we are trying to avoid. The App I am using/testing is PHEVWATCHDOG but I am less concerned about its reading the voltage again AROUND 14V eg 14.4 or 14.2. Watchdog does not deliver Aux battery data when the car is not switched on as it communicates with the car systems to get the battery value. If the system is not on, there is no communication, the static battery reading is not there. The battery reading is the voltage when the car is ON.

I will check to see if the odb2 device will communicate with the car during charging perhaps enough systems are in play. But again the apparent system voltage doesn't give us a log of the static voltage.

I don't need to supply the logs as you just need to make a dealer visit, Simples.
 

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Leaving an obd2 adapter plugged in doesn't seem to be the cause of the battery drain as I have done this for weeks at a time and it's been fine. In cars they usually have a 12v that is only on when the car is on or in the acc state and I would be surprised if this weren't the case for the Ioniq obd2. However the battery has been drained by doing things like leaving the charger plugged in but having the evse powered down at the power socket, which makes me think there are some "sleep" mode bugs in the Ioniq firmware. This happened before I got an obd2 adapter too.
 

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You truly have misunderstood how an ODB2 device works. No surprise there. It needs the car to be ON to communicate with the system, which will then not show the static range of voltages 11.9V-12.6V, which is the important value.
Interesting to read about BEV/PHEV owners reporting charging of the 12V while plugged in. There were earlier reports of monitoring during plugged in with no charging.

OBD voltage stays on while car is off. So it could continue to monitor 12 volt status. I would truly be interested in seeing logs of a few days of operation. Might shed some light into how the battery is maintained. Wasn't suggesting it to get your goat.
 

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Traction battery under charge... Eg 0% - 99% eg podpoint/grannie charger ON, cable plugged in...

Plugged In and STILL charging(blue lights flashing+time to 100%) = Aux battery reads 13.3-13.9. This is the system voltage... Some systems in the car are ON, woken up by the charge cable being plugged in. The car will not charge unless the 12V is good to capture the plug in the car socket. The 12V Aux battery is getting a charge from the system 13.3-.9 because it is above the static level of 12.6.

Traction battery completed charge eg 100% - podpoint charger ON, cable still plugged in... BUT RELEASED....

Plugged in but NO LONGER CHARGING(no blue lights +no display of time to 100%) = Aux battery reads 12.0-12.6V eg the static battery level. The AUX battery cannot be being charged just because the plug is in.

I always have the "release on charge COMPLETE" lamp on. Wonder if that's why they see more than static volts with car not CHARGING and cable plugged in and therefore solenoid ON... The car is still ON partly but power is being supplied by??? THE PODPOINT, Part of charger unit or dc:dc system but why lower than normal?

Might check when solar allows charging TOMOZ but working.

Worse still you have the trunk open while checking the battery and it's lamp is on, the charge cable is still held by the solenoid (unless you have the dash button set to steal my cable when the charge is finished like me) - ANYONE HAVING LOW 12V might want to set the release cable when charging finished to LIGHT ON eg release solenoid.

ODB2 - logs do not contain system voltage on phev watchdog but it does display the system voltage on screen. Thought I had a screen shot. 14.2 or 14.4V. The guy has not even managed to get the current mileage into the logs yet.
Worse still my odb2 adapter died when I last tried to use watchdog. My full Phone won't see it.

Odb2 when car is off does have 12V going to it after car OFF but I would not think it has the capability to measure the voltage itself.

There is a permanent 12V on the odb2 pin out. My cousin uses a solar panel plugged into it. My odb2 light is on when it is switch on but car is off. The odb2 overhead might be quite low but we are dealing low power battery with an imperfect safety system.

Is 14.4V bad for the Aux battery? Saw somewhere AGM battery happier with higher voltage..
 

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I have had my Ioniq for over 2 years now and drive it quite a bit (over 40000 miles). I have NOT had any loss in battery capacity. I will say that ambient temperature does play a large role in how much the battery can be charged. If it is extremely cold (for me that is near freezing) then I can see a range of 105 when fully charged. Currently we are experiencing a decent heat wave (again for us that is ~90) and my range has been back up to 124 when fully charged. I hope this helps.
 

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Still 37 miles and no battery degradation on my 27k miles 2017 PHEV, which is 3 years and 1 month tomorrow. The car was a 6 months old demo model with 8k on the clock. So there was no extra cost for the PHEV over the HEV. I think the £2500 subsidy for the PHEV disappeared recently too.
I drive for free using Solar PV. 1 gallon a month to keep the petrol engine happy.
I have a meter too but it needs to be in a Consumer Unit. Mine is in the Pod point charger CU/switch box. Search eBay for "LCD Digital Single Phase Energy Meter Analyzer Watt KWh Rail Electricity Monitor" £10. It cycles through accumulated charges kWh, voltage, amperage and power factor. Need a qualified electrician to fit of course.
Glad to know @BlueNev! Our 2019 PHEV is only 6 months old and we hardly drive due to covid-19. We got a good deal on the 2019 PHEV which ended up costing about the same as a new HEV after federal tax credit. Hard to beat the feeling of near-completely clean driving locally while we charge on sunny days with solar. :)

Like @xywang84 mentioned, I use a Kill-A-Watt to track KWh used up each time I charge, and I jot down driving distances every day on a spreadsheet as well. Out of the ~900 miles we've driven so far, ~650 has been solar powered.
 
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