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2021 Ioniq PHEV SEL
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Technically, no reason why it wouldn't, unless there's documentation somewhere that say you shouldn't. You'd need to use a level one charger that would be set to draw less than 1700 watts (about 7 amps @ 240 V). According to it's spec, you could get about 10 kW on a tank of fuel (40-50 miles'ish). But probably a bit less due to charging losses and inefficiencies in the current matching between the maximum output of the generator and what the charger will deliver. As they say, YMMV. I'd verify this against operating procedure before trying it though. I'm not sure how accurate those generators can keep their voltage.
 

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I'd agree. The best way to avoid range anxiety is to actually use an EV as it was intended, and never leave yourself needing a top-up at a location where you don't have a backup plan. At least - that worked for me.
 

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UK spec 2020 1st Edition in Polar White
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Would this work on my fully electric ioniq to say give an extra 10 miles?

May I be allowed to summarise and question a lot of your recent posts and please, no offence is meant, I am merely curious.

You previously drove an HEV (just like me) where fuel is available everywhere; you chose to upgrade to a BEV yet it appears you did no research in to the car and it’s tech, nor did you consider the changes to your driving style and practices that would be needed.

Why? What is it you want / expect?

As I say, I am merely curious, because a lot of your posts are very brief and repeat the same range anxiety theme. A fuller explanation of your thoughts/issues/situation will help us to understand and perhaps offer some sensible advice. 😀
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I did do research on the costs, which were attractive and worth it, now I know I need even less maintence that ev require no oil change and easy to fix with fewer parts than a fuel engine. I do agree with you I didn't research the tech behind it as recently i found out 2018 models charge quicker and also it doesnt matter how fast the charger is you will only get max kw capped per hour. I also didn't do research about how bad the network is and the amount of chargers offline a AA guy told me neds damage them stick things in, break the screen. I'm just looking for a backup plan incase 3 chargers are out of order, which has happen more than once and its been only 3 months since i have had the car. There not enough chargers in Scotland only 2500 and there are 11500 petrol stations.
 

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2018 ('68 plate) Intense Blue 28 kWh BEV
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Hi, I thought we reached max petrol stations in the UK in the late 80's with about 20,000 and it's been declining ever since. Pretty sure there are now less then 8,500 and the decline should start to accelerate.

Anyway, regardless how many public chargers Vs petrol stations/pumps in Scotland, I have to say that from what I understand, the Scottish charging infrastructure is a little like a regional version of the Electric Highway network. I'm no expert but the Scottish Parliament seemed to start early and strong, supporting EV adoption with places like Aberdeen being standout, but perhaps that momentum wasn't maintained and reliability or servicing of the devices has fallen behind.

All I can suggest is that you use services like Zap Map to gauge the status of the chargers you need to use and allow for some unexpected issues none the less. I don't venture too far too often, but I read people's comments on Zap Map instead of believing the live status. Then, when you find broken devices, make sure the operator is aware of it and consider a complaint or a letter to your MSP to draw attention. I'm getting more and more picky about who's chargers I'll use, prioritising the networks with consistently good service, though if your bad experiences are in the more remote parts of Scotland then I can imagine that choices might not be very numerous.

I really hope you find it gets easier / less risky as time goes by and you "get the hang of it". We're all still pioneers at this stage.

I've obviously never tried it, but I can't recommend the petrol generator idea. Carrying one around would seem to defeat the purpose as they aren't small and light and will take a while to get you out of trouble. I think I'd carry my granny charger and ask strangers for help with a socket.
 

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1900W output at 240V = 7.9A

If you use the portable EVSE that comes with the car, you need to set the current to Low (approx 5A), there is a button at the back of the device and it should work. However not sure if the generator can provide a true earth neutral for the 13A socket, some EVSE refuse to work with a 13A socket if it is not properly earthed.

At low setting, you should get approx 7km per hour charging, so 10 miles should be around 2 hours.

I can understand why some EV owners would like to have a plan B, after all if natural disaster strikes (such as wild fire, typhoon, earthquake etc) and knock out the local power grid for days, one don't want to get stuck in such situations, so having a plan B is never a bad thing in life.
 
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