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2021 Chevy Bolt, reserved Ioniq 5
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Here’s my average in this travel 20kwh/100km close to 322wh/mi

Almost all the time with full trunks and four passengers onboard (exterior temperature 38-41 Celsius )


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Excellent. This type of long trip give me great confidence the I5 will meet my needs. If you have more long trips, please post the results. :):):)
 

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In short trips (max speed 90km/h) the average is more better..
(Two passengers)




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2022 Ioniq 5 AWD Balance Vision
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I saw a German guy on YouTube with a Ioniq 5 AWD 20 inch wheels.
He makes like a sort of diary of his car. The problem is that his explanation is rather tedious, but he shows us the reality and passes on his findings and experiences. Link of the concerned video.
He has the car now 2 weeks has driven 330km with airco on. He has driven a real mix of
  • city (30 and 50km/h),
  • normal roads (80, 90 and 100km/h)
  • highway (130hm/h)
  • real accelerations to pass someone.
So he really has driven a normal daily way, without any restrictions regarding consumption.
The result is an average consumption on this 330km of 16.4 kWh/100km.
This is a good result I think.
 

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A German reviewer created his "BEN INDEX" of cars he reviewed complete with YouTube links, including the Hyundai IONIQ 5. See attached Excel file link below
 

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2022 Ioniq 5 AWD Balance Vision
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A German reviewer created his "BEN INDEX" of cars he reviewed complete with YouTube links, including the Hyundai IONIQ 5. See attached Excel file link below
yes I know, I have seen a lot of his video's, but I am not so convinced of his objectivity and test methods.
 

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2021 Chevy Bolt, reserved Ioniq 5
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In short trips (max speed 90km/h) the average is more better..
(Two passengers)




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Thanks again.
For your information, driving around town in my Chevy Bolt EV I get 4.7mi/kWh or 13.2 kW/100km. Speed is max of 110km/hr with typical of 50 to 75 km/hr with a number of stops at lights. The Bolt was sold in Europe for a short time as the Ampera-e.
 

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2021 Chevy Bolt, reserved Ioniq 5
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In short trips (max speed 90km/h) the average is more better..
(Two passengers)




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I read your posts again but I did not see if your car is RWD or AWD. Pease advise as to configuration.
 

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2022 Ioniq 5 AWD Balance Vision
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Yes very good test with very surprising results, at least for me.
I want to explain the test to the people that didn't understand German :
The guy for Nextmove Germany took 4 cars :
  1. IONIQ 5 - 72 KWh battery - 225 KW AWD - 20" wheels
  2. IONIQ 5 - 72 KWh battery - 160 KW RWD - 19" wheels
  3. IONIQ 5 - 58 KWh battery - 125 KW RWD - 19" wheels
  4. Kia e-Niro - 64 KWh battery - 150 KW FWD - !7" wheels
Test conditions :
All the cars have been charged 100%.
The outside temperature was 22 deg Celsius.
Normal interior heating/cooling is activated on all cars at 22 deg C.
Recuperation is set to 0.
The cars have to follow each other at exactly the same speed with a minimum distance of 100m.
Test distance 3 x 94 km on the highway.
  • 1 x 94 km at 100km/h
  • 1 x 94 km at 130km/h
  • 1 x 94km to get the battery as low as possible +150km/h for the charging test.

TEST 1 : cruise control is set at 100km/h. Average real speed in this test of 94 km/h
consumption and range
  1. 17.1 KWh/100km = 416 km
  2. 16.3 KWh/100km = 436 km
  3. 15.2 KWh/100km = 371 km
  4. 14.1 KWh/100km = 450 km
difference to WTLP
  1. 416km -> 430km WLTP = - 3.3%
  2. 436km -> 481km WLTP = - 9.4%
  3. 371km -> 384km WLTP = - 3.4%
  4. 450km -> 455km WLTP = - 1.1%
TEST 2 : cruise control is set at 130km/h. Average real speed in this test of 114 km/h
consumption and range
  1. 23.0 KWh/100km = 325 km
  2. 22.1 KWh/100km = 338 km
  3. 21.3 KWh/100km = 278 km
  4. 18.7 KWh/100km = 366 km
TEST 3: charge speed to 80%
  1. from 17% to 80%: 16 min 25 sec
  2. from 20% to 80%: 16 min 20 sec
  3. from 2% to 80%: 20 min 05 sec
My conclusions:
The biggest surprise for me is that the difference, between an AWD 20 inch and an RWD 19 inch, is so little !!!!
  • only 20 km range difference at 100km/h
  • only 13 km range difference at 130km/h

Hope this helped you
 

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Yes very good test with very surprising results, at least for me.
I want to explain the test to the people that didn't understand German :
The guy for Nextmove Germany took 4 cars :
  1. IONIQ 5 - 72 KWh battery - 225 KW AWD - 20" wheels
  2. IONIQ 5 - 72 KWh battery - 160 KW RWD - 19" wheels
  3. IONIQ 5 - 58 KWh battery - 125 KW RWD - 19" wheels
  4. Kia e-Niro - 64 KWh battery - 150 KW FWD - !7" wheels
Test conditions :
All the cars have been charged 100%.
The outside temperature was 22 deg Celsius.
Normal interior heating/cooling is activated on all cars at 22 deg C.
Recuperation is set to 0.
The cars have to follow each other at exactly the same speed with a minimum distance of 100m.
Test distance 3 x 94 km on the highway.
  • 1 x 94 km at 100km/h
  • 1 x 94 km at 130km/h
  • 1 x 94km to get the battery as low as possible +150km/h for the charging test.

TEST 1 : cruise control is set at 100km/h. Average real speed in this test of 94 km/h
consumption and range
  1. 17.1 KWh/100km = 416 km
  2. 16.3 KWh/100km = 436 km
  3. 15.2 KWh/100km = 371 km
  4. 14.1 KWh/100km = 450 km
difference to WTLP
  1. 416km -> 430km WLTP = - 3.3%
  2. 436km -> 481km WLTP = - 9.4%
  3. 371km -> 384km WLTP = - 3.4%
  4. 450km -> 455km WLTP = - 1.1%
TEST 2 : cruise control is set at 130km/h. Average real speed in this test of 114 km/h
consumption and range
  1. 23.0 KWh/100km = 325 km
  2. 22.1 KWh/100km = 338 km
  3. 21.3 KWh/100km = 278 km
  4. 18.7 KWh/100km = 366 km
TEST 3: charge speed to 80%
  1. from 17% to 80%: 16 min 25 sec
  2. from 20% to 80%: 16 min 20 sec
  3. from 2% to 80%: 20 min 05 sec
My conclusions:
The biggest surprise for me is that the difference, between an AWD 20 inch and an RWD 19 inch, is so little !!!!
  • only 20 km range difference at 100km/h
  • only 13 km range difference at 130km/h

Hope this helped you
That is interesting, though perhaps situational? It kind of make some sense in that at high speed drag from the body is a much greater element than drag from the wheels / rolling resistance. A result of 325 km at 114kph (~70mph) is not impressive, though adequate.

For us in the us, assuming range is linear with capacity, that would give a range of ~346km = ~214 miles which definitely makes me a bit uncomfortable. It's definitely workable, but not what I'd hope for. We keep seeing somewhat conflicting reports from different sources, but it does seem that the relatively poor drag coefficient doesn't do the model favors at high speed (though perhaps it's not all drag? Hopefully part of it is something that can be patched with refined software)
 

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2021 Chevy Bolt, reserved Ioniq 5
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That is interesting, though perhaps situational? It kind of make some sense in that at high speed drag from the body is a much greater element than drag from the wheels / rolling resistance. A result of 325 km at 114kph (~70mph) is not impressive, though adequate.

For us in the us, assuming range is linear with capacity, that would give a range of ~346km = ~214 miles which definitely makes me a bit uncomfortable. It's definitely workable, but not what I'd hope for. We keep seeing somewhat conflicting reports from different sources, but it does seem that the relatively poor drag coefficient doesn't do the model favors at high speed (though perhaps it's not all drag? Hopefully part of it is something that can be patched with refined software)
I think the only car now available that will go further at 70 mph is the Tesla S. I believer this is equal or slightly better than the Y. BUT remember for most long trips you will only be using 60% of the battery - from 20% to 80%. Some will go down to 10%.
 

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I think the only car now available that will go further at 70 mph is the Tesla S. I believer this is equal or slightly better than the Y. BUT remember for most long trips you will only be using 60% of the battery - from 20% to 80%. Some will go down to 10%.
I've seen two contradictory numbers for the Model Y. Insideevs got ~276 miles at 70mph, Car and Driver got 220 at 75mph. Clearly there's some funk in those numbers, but in any case the Model Y is at least somewhat more efficient (Tesla claims a drag coefficient of 0.23, compared to the I5's 0.288, which could make the difference). You're right about realistic drive ranges (though you're probably just fine driving down to 10% or below if you need to on most EVs, as there's usually a few percent usable buffer "below zero" and a few percent further buffer that the BMS locks out, so you shouldn't harm the battery unless you do it frequently.

In any case, these numbers make me a bit uncomfortable, but at the same time I know they're more than enough for my purposes (The longest drive I do with any frequency is around a 100 mile round trip. A couple times a year I go 200 miles each way for a weekend)
 

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That is interesting, though perhaps situational? It kind of make some sense in that at high speed drag from the body is a much greater element than drag from the wheels / rolling resistance. A result of 325 km at 114kph (~70mph) is not impressive, though adequate.

For us in the us, assuming range is linear with capacity, that would give a range of ~346km = ~214 miles which definitely makes me a bit uncomfortable. It's definitely workable, but not what I'd hope for. We keep seeing somewhat conflicting reports from different sources, but it does seem that the relatively poor drag coefficient doesn't do the model favors at high speed (though perhaps it's not all drag? Hopefully part of it is something that can be patched with refined software)
Both tests have been driven completely on automatic cruise control, in normal mode and with recuperation 0.
The first test was on ACC set to 100kph (62 mph), the second test on 130kph (80mph). The average of the second was only 114 kph (~70mph), because they had a small traffic jam, otherwise it had been much closer to 130kph(~80mph)
I think for the US, this may not be a problem, driving 60 or even 70mph makes a huge difference.
But it is a fact that the drag coefficient plays a big role in consumption / range, much more than the difference of wheels (19 vs 20”) or RWD vs AWD.
 
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