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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

New to this forum. I had a 2016 Prius for the past few years that I got the 2nd month it came out. It was a Prius four, fully loaded and loved that car. I was in an accident last month where a person ran a red light and totaled my car.

I'm looking for a new car to buy and the Ioniq Hybrid is quickly becoming the front runner. The value to money looks to be a bit better. Do any other former Prius owners have any comparisons? How's your MPG, ride any rougher like I heard? I was averaging 57 MPG in my Prius.

Appreciate any thoughts and buying purchasing strategies too!

Thanks,
Eric
 

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I can’t give you like for like comparison, but I went from a 2012 Prius to a 2018 full electric Ioniq.

I thought I would miss the head up display and the big digital speedo. I haven’t!

The Ioniq has a larger trunk, a comfier fifth seat and from what’s said on this forum gives about 10mpg better.

For me, full electric was a sensible choice. I had looked at both Prius hybrid and plug-in but the plug in was only a 4 seater with a small trunk.

I was getting about the same mpg (UK) as you. I’ve done just over 2000 miles which would have cost about £250 for petrol in the Prius. Electricity for the Ioniq would only cost £86. That said, It didn’t cost even that as I charge off solar when possible. True electric fuel cost just £27.

Whichever version you go for, the Ioniq won’t disappoint.
 

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I had a total of 3 Priuses since 2007, the latest a 2014 liftback 3. I decided to trade it recently, and initially thought I'd get another Prius.

There are two reasons I didn't. The first is that, not for the first time, Toyota had moved a lot of the equipment I had in my existing car to a model further up the range that I couldn't really afford, so to stick with a Prius, I'd either have to keep the 2014, or end up replacing it with one that had less of the features I'd been used to, such as 3-door keyless entry and GPS.

The second turned out to be the Ioniq. The little research I did on it before I went to drive one made me interested, but I wasn't convinced an Ioniq was a serious contender. The test drive proved otherwise. It was much quieter, steering feel was better and more precise, acceleration much more brisk, the 6-speed dual-clutch gearbox felt much better than the Prius CVT, the brakes were much smoother and felt more positive, and the car, inside and out, felt more solid and less flimsy.

I ended up buying the hybrid SEL model, and I love it. It is currently on the second tank of fuel. The first returned 61.8mpg on the display (60.13 calculated from the fuel added), and the second is showing 66.5, which I assume will turn out to be a little optimistic too, probably closer to 62 when I fill up. The Prius on the other hand was returning typically 54mpg around town, and 50 on interstates.

One interesting factor is that the Ioniq stays in EV mode rather more, because the battery seems to have higher capacity. It can also remain in EV mode at much higher speeds.

The Ioniq has slightly firmer seats, though the motorised adjustments in the SEL and Limited are better than on the Prius, and the interior is more roomy - it feels like it at least. Materials used are not inspiring, but quite pleasing, and the dashboard and entertainment system are both more conventional, yet rather easier to use and less distracting. There is also Apple CarPlay and Android Auto support, which works well.

There's also a dual zone climate control, which I thought a bit of a gimmick, until it was clear that every time my wife and I are in the car, she likes her side colder than I do, and we're both happy now, where in the Prius one of us got our way, or we ended up with a compromise where neither of us was comfortable.

With the dealer prepared to offer incentives to buy, my SEL cost about $6000 less than a similarly equipped Prius. It was really a no-brainer.

I'm very happy with the decision. The only downside really is that if you like broadcasting your green credentials to other road users, the Prius will do that, while the Ioniq won't - nobody seems to notice. It also doesn't have all the eco-friendly informational display options the Prius has, but to drive it economically, the Ioniq doesn't seem to need them - in my experience, just driving it gets good results.

One other thing the Ioniq has, which the Prius didn't, is 'Sport Mode'. The Prius has 'Power Mode' which largely remaps the throttle peddle to give more brisk acceleration with a lighter foot, but little more. In the Ioniq, Sport Mode adds weight to the steering too, giving it greater feel, and the dashboard switches from speedometer to tachometer (with a digital speed readout), and shows you the gear setting, because in Sport Mode the gearbox can be manually controlled (the SEL also has paddle gear change selectors for Sport Mode.)

For a model that had only been on the market for a fraction of the time the Prius has, the Ioniq feels like a very mature product. I'd recommend a test drive at the very least.
 

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I just traded my 2018 prius 3 for the SEL 2019 hybrid. Loved my prius, but I find my Ioniq has better sound system, slightly better mpg, and drives better. I plan on trading for the 2020 Ioniq hybrid when they arrive at my dealers.
 

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I just traded my 2018 prius 3 for the SEL 2019 hybrid. Loved my prius, but I find my Ioniq has better sound system, slightly better mpg, and drives better. I plan on trading for the 2020 Ioniq hybrid when they arrive at my dealers.
What new features of the 2020 are enticing you to trade so quickly?
 

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I had a 2006 Prius and tossed it to buy an Ioniq Limited Ultimate. Fantastic decision, I love the Ioniq. I looked at the new Prius and were totally unimpressed. Felt more plasticy, didn't like the ride, Toyota continues to refuse to include Android Auto which is absurd, and much more. The Ioniq gets notably better mileage than the Prius, especially once I put All Season tires on the Prius (which dropped the MPG by about 5) since I live in Colorado.

One other key advantage of the Ioniq if you are one who tends to keep cars for a long time (and someone does not total it for you) is the battery has a lifetime warranty for the original owner. Toyota won't touch that concept. I had to put a battery into my Prius at 135K miles :(

I have another friend who had a 2010 Prius and recently replaced it with an Ioniq and also is wildly happy. Yet another friend who had a 2004 Prius and replaced it with a 2018 Prius Prime and is very unhappy with it. He says the entertainment system is poorly designed and implemented, the car does not ride well, only has 4 seats, and so much more. Wishes now he had gone with an Ioniq PHEV.
 

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The Prius Gen 4 (not Gen 3) and the Ioniq are neck and neck with mpg in the 50 to 52 mpg range (Fuelly is a great resource). You may do slightly better with the Prius if you do a lot of high speed interstate trips, they both have about the same Cd, but the Prius has a bit less frontal area.

Consider also the Kia Niro. Same drivetrain in a small wagon (Kia calls it an SUV) giving you the seat height most Americans appear to prefer, and lots more room in a slightly shorter car. Fuelly has it at about 45 mpg, but with all three cars, driving style has a major impact. I've owned a Niro for 14 months of four season weather and my average measured mpg over 20,000 miles is 52 mpg. Of course, I do drive like a little old lady and never exceed 65 mph. In all three cars, results in warm San Diego should be better than Fuelly.

For all three cars, consider the PHEV version if appropriate. The lane sticker alone might be worth it if you commute daily. Might even be less expensive than the HEV with the federal and state rebates and if you can plug in at a reasonable cost, your fuel costs should be less. But from what I read here, it is very difficult to get a PHEV in California for less than MRSP because of the commuting benefits there.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks, Andy for the comparison from the Prius, very helpful! The hybrid SEL model is the one I am considering as well. Sounds like the MPGs can be even better! I'm test driving next week and if all goes well purchasing by June.
 

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Thanks, Andy for the comparison from the Prius, very helpful! The hybrid SEL model is the one I am considering as well. Sounds like the MPGs can be even better! I'm test driving next week and if all goes well purchasing by June.
The Ioniq is certainly capable of better mpg than the Prius, mostly (I suspect) as a result of the use of a Lithium battery rather than the older technology Nickel in the Prius. It seems to drain more slowly in EV mode, and charge faster.

In the Ioniq, when you drive one, the battery charge indicator is the large white gauge on the right of the instrument panel. The major difference between the Prius and the Ioniq when you're looking at battery status is that the Prius has always been biased towards charging to the top-end of the gauge, but the Ioniq is not. It aims for a charge level in the middle third. It may seem, therefore, as if the Ioniq ought to have less power for EV use, but in practice is doesn't seem to be so.

Also, the Ioniq's 6-speed dual-clutch gearbox feels very different from the Prius CVT. In particular, the 1st and 2nd gear changes may feel a bit early and abrupt, particularly if you are accelerating gently. I realised when driving mine that I was applying Prius techniques to it. Slightly better acceleration doesn't hurt the Ioniq's mpg, and makes the early gear changes feel more smooth. One great advantage of the gearbox is that you don't get the really high engine revs the Prius often produced when accelerating hard from low speed. The Ioniq sounds much more sedate, even when it is accelerating hard.

And one thing that is not mentioned much... the Ioniq does not have a traditional 12 volt battery that can go flat if you accidentally leave something on with the car powered down. It has a 12 volt system which is integrated with the traction battery, so if it goes inadvertently flat, all you do is press the '12 volt reset' button on the dashboard, which in essence jump-starts it from the traction battery. It's a really nice touch!
 

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The Ioniq is certainly capable of better mpg than the Prius, mostly (I suspect) as a result of the use of a Lithium battery rather than the older technology Nickel in the Prius. It seems to drain more slowly in EV mode, and charge faster.
Not fair to compare your Prius Gen 3 with a new car, either the Gen 4 Prius or the Ioniq. Both get 10% or so better mpg than a Gen 3 Prius. Most new Gen 4 Prii have lithium batteries.
 

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Not fair to compare your Prius Gen 3 with a new car, either the Gen 4 Prius or the Ioniq. Both get 10% or so better mpg than a Gen 3 Prius. Most new Gen 4 Prii have lithium batteries.
Please don't presume I don't know the differences in driving experience and fuel economy between the Gen 3 and 4, and haven't actually driven a Gen 4. I didn't own one, but I have driven 2 of them over the past year.

The best I got out of a Gen 4 on my daily commute was 56, vs the Gen 3's 54 at the time. While the Gen 4 certainly is tighter and less harsh to drive, but not the significant improvement you imply.

And because the OP was discussing the possibility of a purchase, it was the Gen 4 that most of my comments about driving a Prius have been based on. It is simply not refined in any significant way over the previous generations - in my experience.
 

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Please don't presume I don't know the differences in driving experience and fuel economy between the Gen 3 and 4, and haven't actually driven a Gen 4. I didn't own one, but I have driven 2 of them over the past year.

The best I got out of a Gen 4 on my daily commute was 56, vs the Gen 3's 54 at the time. While the Gen 4 certainly is tighter and less harsh to drive, but not the significant improvement you imply.

And because the OP was discussing the possibility of a purchase, it was the Gen 4 that most of my comments about driving a Prius have been based on. It is simply not refined in any significant way over the previous generations - in my experience.
Since you stated ownership of a 2014 (which is Gen 3), I had no idea you were talking about a previously unmentioned Gen 4. All the reviews, the EPA rating, and Fuelly show a 10 percent better efficiency of Gen 4 over 3. I didn't make that up.

Every review also says handling on the Gen 4 is much improved because they ditched the torsion bar rear suspension and I'd say that is a refinement. Lots of other improvements too (I only mentioned efficiency in earlier posts) but better handling and suspension derived comfort is a big one for me, otherwise you are just driving a penalty box like Gen 3. Stating that the Gen 4 and the Ioniq are on a par for efficiency is true based on the objective data available. Obviously, anecdotes are fine in a forum too!
 

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Since you stated ownership of a 2014 (which is Gen 3), I had no idea you were talking about a previously unmentioned Gen 4. All the reviews, the EPA rating, and Fuelly show a 10 percent better efficiency of Gen 4 over 3. I didn't make that up.

Every review also says handling on the Gen 4 is much improved because they ditched the torsion bar rear suspension and I'd say that is a refinement. Lots of other improvements too (I only mentioned efficiency in earlier posts) but better handling and suspension derived comfort is a big one for me, otherwise you are just driving a penalty box like Gen 3. Stating that the Gen 4 and the Ioniq are on a par for efficiency is true based on the objective data available. Obviously, anecdotes are fine in a forum too!
While my intention was to provide the OP with experience of driving an Ioniq, comparisons with the Prius were inevitable, and my experience of the Gen 4 had not been 'night-and-day' improvements so much as somewhat incremental ones.

As I said above, the Gen 4 was tighter and less harsh. It felt better on the road in as far as the Gen 3 was rather more detached, but the differences were not all that great. The Gen 4 platform is tighter, but overall, I didn't think it significantly better, or even significantly different, and while the ride is better, less 'jumpy' on rough surfaces, it was not much of a difference in the places I drove.

I had also seen reviews of the Gen 4, but was rather disappointed. By comparison to my experience driving, and owning, Priuses, I stand by the comments I made regarding the comparative experience of the Ioniq. In every way (at least that matters to me) the Ioniq is a better vehicle, renders a better driving experience, and results in better fuel economy.

Where fuel economy is concerned, I didn't experience a 10% improvement in the Gen 4, but that said, I typically had got a little above EPA on my Gen 2 and 2x Gen 3 Priuses anyway - at least mostly. The 2014 began to suffer degraded numbers over the last 6-9 months, for reasons that were never entirely clear, and the 2011 before it had poor MPG for the first 6 months or so, but then improved somewhat.

Overall, however, I like the Prius, though the interior of the Gen 4 is hard to take seriously - but perhaps that's the point. Externally, a Gen 4 in black was what I had been planning on buying.

I take your point on objective measurements, but to my mind, driving a car is not an objective experience but a subjective one. As such, I am far more interested on what it is like to get in a vehicle and drive it myself, whether it's a fuel-efficient car, a double-decker bus or a 40 ton HGV. There are objective observations one can make, such as that some of the plastics in the cabin are easily scratched, or that sunlight on the top of the dash creates a glare in the windscreen when driving, but mostly the experience is a subjective exercise. For example, for me, a comfortable driving position in every Prius has resulted in my knees being in close proximity to the steering column, while in the Ioniq, there is far more space. Why? No idea, because I'm not interested in grabbing a tape measure and calculating it out, but the space is better (for me, that is) in the Ioniq.

There are other subjective realities too, such as that at one point every day, I cross two railway tracks that are at an angle to the road. In each Prius (including the Gen 4) crossing the tracks resulted in being bounced sideways in the cabin if the crossing was approached above 15mph. At 20mph in the Ioniq, it is barely felt. Why? No idea. Undoubtedly its related to suspension design, but as a driver, it is the result I am interested in.

Another example is actual fuel-use experience. To give a simple example, on an average spring morning (last year), with a temperature of 60f, my Gen 3 Prius returned 70.3mpg on the commute to work. The same day, it returned 52mpg on the return home. On a spring morning with a temperature of 58f (this year), my Ioniq returned 95.6mpg, and 64.9 on the home trip. These are numbers off the dash, and therefore optimistic, but I know the difference in each car between the display and the calculation, and know those to be a valid comparison, even if above the actual numbers. I don't have a Gen 4 number for the same conditions, but an autumn day with a 65f temperature, the Gen 4 did 74.4 and 56 respectively. I'll admit that these are not entirely objective because there are all sorts of factors that can impact fuel efficiency that are not just temperature, but subjectively, the Ioniq does return better numbers. Why? I presumed it was battery capacity because it does enter EV mode in places and circumstances the Priuses have not, and stay there longer than the Priuses, but if the batteries are the same, then the cause is something else.

Likewise, Fuelly provides the result others get in fuel economy, but is not greatly likely to reflect the nature of use that matches mine, so while the numbers there may be informative, they are not indicative.

In summary, in this instance, the OP can take my experiences, or yours, or indeed anyone else's, and translate that into his own needs and usage in order to form a judgement on the test drive, and subsequent considerations. My view is that the Gen 4 experience was nothing remarkable in comparison to ownership and use experiences of the previous models, so didn't attempt to differentiate between them because I presumed the OP capable of forming his own views based on test drives of vehicles he takes an interest in.
 

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I was going to edit this into my prior post, but the edit function vanished, so I'll add it here....

In pondering why you might think the difference in Gen 3/Gen 4 experiences would be so great, I note your description of the Gen 3 as:
...otherwise you are just driving a penalty box like Gen 3.
Which is curious, because I owned and drove 2 of them over 8 years, and that characterisation of my cars is not even remotely familiar to me. They were distinct advances in driving comfort and civility over the Gen 2, and aside from being rather a harsh ride on rough roads - a common complaint in small cars, noisy under hard acceleration, and somewhat detached from the road in steering feel, they were actually good cars to drive. More than acceptably comfortable, good for prolonged driving without breaks, reasonably quiet, and quite refined. It's actually rather insulting to have my vehicular choices described so derisively.

In any event, that is why the Gen 4 was not remarkably better; the Gen 3 was not markedly worse.
 

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Perhaps you never compared the earlier Prii to other cars on the road. If they were the only cars you drove, then of course you might think they were great. Generally there is an owner bias as well for most.

Objective data is indicative of personal results. When talking about efficiency, if your personal results on a particular car is above or below the aggregated Fuelly results or EPA ratings, then your results on another car will usually be similarly above or below.

It is interesting to compare aggregated Fuelly results and EPA ratings with forum anecdotal results. Fuelly is almost always lower other than forum posts complaining about bad mpg (often season related changes which cannot be derived easily on Fuelly). There are multiple reasons for this, and neither is necessarily wrong, although large scale results do minimize random data entry mistakes. Most who post on hybrid/EV forums are interested in efficiency so typically outperform a group average (including myself). The bell curve owners who do not post on forums and drive a hybrid like any other car bring down the average (but still outperform ICE cars).
 

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Andy, I could not have said what you stated about the comparisons any better. I have owned 5 prius over the years years and some very expensive autos too. I love the way my Ioniq drives and how I feel about this car. I think the prius is a great car, but they need some drastic changes to get to the top again in the hybrid car car world of today!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Test drove the Ioniq Hybrid SEL this week and loved it! Like many of you said, drives even better than the Prius and felt more responsive! Hoping to buy this coming week, will post a few photos after. I was thinking I the summit grey, but after seeing in person I'm now thinking the white with beige interior. Very sharp! Anyone else have the beige interior and like it better?
 

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When I got my Ioniq I wanted white with beige interior. The dealership had several cars on display (Elantra, Tucson, Sonata, etc) and most were white with beige interiors. They all looked really good. But the Ioniqs were hard to find so the one I ended up with was white with a charcoal grey interior. I actually like the grey interior a lot and I'm glad I got it.

When I see the photos that people post on the forum I really like the look of the summit grey Ioniqs. If I hadn't gotten white then that grey would be my second choice. Either way you go it's a great car.
 
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