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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone from the United States! The Kia Niro is now on sale here (about one week), and the Ioniq coming in the next few weeks (I think - they are rather vague). I first found out about the Ioniq about 6 weeks ago and have been reading reviews like crazy ever since, most coming from the UK and Europe. My dream car was actually the Fit Hybrid but Honda in their wisdom decided not to export them to the US. The Niro/Ioniq has a similar dual clutch. While I haven't driven the latest Prius (the new one is far better than prior versions by all reports), I haven't like any of the ones I have driven to date, nor any other CVT car for that matter.

I intend to buy the Niro or Ioniq this year, my first new car since my 2001 PT Cruiser. I'm going to drive them first, and check out how my bicycle and gear might fit inside (which is how I made my decision to buy the PT). I'm considering waiting for the plug in version, in part because I suspect I will like their drivability better with stronger regenerative braking (which I'm hoping will be similar to the Ioniq EV) for perhaps Tesla like one pedal driving (the Ioniq EV has paddle "shifters" to increase braking action). In addition, the extra cost of the plug in is largely negated in the US by a $4,000 (or possibly more) tax credit if Trump doesn't cancel that.

So the real reason I posted is to ask about Fuelly.com and I'm hoping some members have experience with them. Both the Niro and Ioniq are now on it in small quantities (it is mostly a US user mileage log and mpg database and has smartphone apps), and most of those are from the UK. Fuelly is a bit frustrating in that they don't break down the reports by model. As most of you are doubtless aware, the higher trim models with larger wheels get significantly higher fuel consumption. I'd like to know real world fuel consumption of these cars, but there are no US posters on Fuelly yet, and most reviewers tested the higher trim models. As best as I can determine, Fuelly doesn't adjust between British and US gallon sizes, but if I use the more likely British gallons posted by UK drivers, the resulting mpg seems lower than I expected. I'll poke around on this site for mpg anecdotes, but if anyone would like to address the mpg or Fuelly issue in this thread, it would be much appreciated.
 

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welcome yticolev


mine has the highest mileage tracked on Fuelly, it is a mid range (premium model) with 15 inch wheels, I am not aware off hand of any of the Ioniq's on fuelly with the option 17 inch wheels


mine is just below EPA mpg, I would ignore the unrealistic European mpg stats as they are rarely achievable

https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/noframes/38484.shtml


my 65mpg UK converts to 54mpg US so only 1 mpg below EPA


as a rough guide divide UK mpg by 1.2 to get US mpg (60mpg UK = 50mpg US)


PS I like the name (velocity backwards :) )
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I'm delighted to hear your mpg is in range of expected EPA estimates and now that I have your number, it appears that Fuelly is automatically converting imperial to US gallons based on IP address. I was converting what I thought were imperial gallons to get a really bad number! So indeed the Ioniq is getting decent mileage.

On closer examination, Fuelly does break results down into trim subcategories. The eleven Ioniqs on Fuelly are (2) Base, (3) Premium, (4) HEV plus, (2) other. That is going to be a mess when listings from even more countries weigh in. Canadian models are different from US model names, so that is 10 more different model names right there!

The fourth generation Prius does differ in that Fuelly reports a higher percentage of EPA estimates achieved than most cars, including the Ioniq. It doesn't take much work to exceed the Prius EPA estimates and hypermilers are having spectacular results. I found a link in a thread here to the raw EPA results on a spreadsheet, and the unadjusted Prius numbers were much higher than than the Ioniq. However EPA is weighting the results into combined numbers is not being reflected in the real world.

That is not going to stop me from purchasing an Ioniq, there are other benefits beyond having the most economical car in the market. But it is disappointing. I thought that might be the case from all the European reviews I read which cited a lower fuel consumption than the Prius so I had a clue, but I was still hopeful.

There is a lot of interesting info on this forum, including why the Ioniq is not rated as high as the Prius in pollution emissions. Thanks for hosting.
 

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Velocity,
In fuelly you can simply choose the units you want at the top left of the screen (US,UK, KM/L L/100KM)

Indeed it's a bit confusing all countries have different names and configurations for the 3 trim levels available. Even Belgium differs from Holland and we don't know why. For fuel economy it would be nice to know the total car weight in different trim levels, but that's unclear.

Mine is the mid-spec (no sun-roof, no leather) with the standard 15" wheels.
Fuelly: IONIQ Hybrid Comfort NL (Hyundai Ioniq) | Fuelly
Keep in mind temps are low here now (around freezing point), I mainly drive relatively short distances (commute about 12 miles) and I am on winter tyres. Some say winter tyres use 5-10% more fuel. So I hope my fuel-economy will be a lot better in the summertime and on longer trips.
As you can see, I'm not a real ECO driver as Mr. Bluecar1 is. At highways, I drive more often at speeds of 120km/h (75) than 100 km/h (60).
Most IONIQs on fuelly are driving in winter conditions right now, so the average will be better in summertime.
I think our IONIQ is on par with the Prius 4 in same conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Excellent point about winter drops in fuel economy. In the US, we switch petrol configurations seasonally which is also blamed for a drop in winter mpg. I notice around an 8 to 10% drop in my car, and for some reason a much greater drop in my motorcycle on the order of 15% (a bike I bought for the fuel efficiency - three year average is exactly 68 mpg US).

I'm also interested in weight differences between trim levels. I don't believe for a second that if you get the second trim level with no options that the weight increases significantly. Frankly, I do want the second trim level only because I can now option the safety stuff like autonomous braking. I have to believe those are no more than 50 lbs (~20 kg). If I end up with the Niro, I don't want the roof rails which are almost certainly are the largest part of the fuel efficiency difference between the base and second trim.
 
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