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2019 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in
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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings! Hope everyone is safe and staying healthy at this difficult time.

We just bought a new 2019 Hyundai Ioniq Plugin (base/white + beige)! Got an excellent deal that made led us to choose it over a used HEV SEL with more bells and whistles (against our nominal preference to buy new cars). Hope we chose right. :)

This is a neat forum! I've read through quite a few useful posts already as I was waiting to receive the car.

We are a 1-car household, and drive around 7,500 miles a year, and use electric-assist bikes during nicer weather for our job commutes. We are looking forward to doing most of our local non-e-biking drives (~3000 miles/year) on EV mode, and to charge as much as possible with solar power on sunny afternoons. And we look forward to excellent MPG on longer trips and such that we take occasionally including 1-3 roadtrips (~1200-1800 mile round trip) we take each year - on HEV mode, my hope is to get 55mpg, or at least the rated 52mpg while accepting lower MPGs over winter.

We've been driving hybrids for a while - a 2008 Honda Civic Hybrid (nice car but NiMH battery) for 11 years and a used 2013 Honda Civic Hybrid (Li-ion battery but a bit more clunky, IMO). We averaged ~46-47 mpg on those vehicles. We do not get into extreme hypermiling techniques but do baby the gas pedal a lot, coast when slowing down, don't use A/C much -- typically the electric compressor on previous vehicles -- except for defogging and during longer trips in the peak of summer, etc..

We've only take one local drive so far but look forward to getting to know the ins and outs of this vehicle.

A few whines about which I might start a separate thread or follow up on an existing one: 1) Missing maintenance minder - it makes no sense for a modern vehicle with such advanced technology to not quantify based on observed metrics when to change oil, etc. Even early 2000s Honda had a maintenance minder! 2) Missing electric compressor for light A/C use. 3) Use of the halogen headlamps instead of the LED DRL in auto setting as front approach lights - makes no sense! 4) Old fashioned 12 V battery instead of the Li-ion they adopted to use on HEVs. 5) Including only a slow charger with the vehicle.**

Thanks again for all the tips - I hope to contribute to the forum in the future in any way I can.

** I've seen a couple of threads indicating one could buy an adapter and use a 220 V outlet with the charger but its specs clearly say 110V (and not 110-240V) so I am not sure I want to try. Using the slow charger decreases peak electricity draw so I suppose it's not all bad.
 

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2020 Ioniq PHEV SE
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Greetings. I just got my 2020 PHEV and do have a maintenance minder set at 7.5k miles. You can also adjust the setting. Perhaps you can download the manual as it's in there. As for 2, 3, and 4, yes those are interesting choices but if you follow the money trail there is always planned obsolescence to consider. For the price point I'm ok with them.
 

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2019 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in
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Discussion Starter #3
Greetings. I just got my 2020 PHEV and do have a maintenance minder set at 7.5k miles. You can also adjust the setting. Perhaps you can download the manual as it's in there. As for 2, 3, and 4, yes those are interesting choices but if you follow the money trail there is always planned obsolescence to consider. For the price point I'm ok with them.
Thanks @cybaker - I did that too, and was complaining that the vehicle does not have an actual maintenance minder--one that bases its recommendations on engine revolutions, or particulate matter count, or the like. It's been standard on most Japanese cars since the mid 2000s. I suspect this, item #2, and #4 (#5 too) are about keeping the price lower than competitors by cutting out additional engineering complexity. Item #3 seems like a design lapse, to use 50W+ headlamps (even if only for 15s) instead of the LED bulbs (<~5W?) in the front of the car.
 

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2020 Ioniq PHEV SE
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Thanks @ecocentric . Agreed, it's a minimal maintenance minder, and thanks for the schooling on observable metrics. I'm guessing #3 is cost related, but even 50W is minor draw compared to the EV motor at 50kW (60 hp). So there's a factor of 1000 difference for the 0.05kW light, and another order of magnitude for the LED. Yes, that's getting chintzy. 99.90% vs 99.99% consumption difference. I'll live with that if the brightness is as good as LEDs. The price difference seems maybe double for LEDs, but in bulk the difference may be about $10 US. But I'd take this over a Prius any day. I like the interior, the exterior is as good as a civic except maybe the front grill, roomier inside too.
 

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Welcome to the forum ecocentric. How did you find a phev in Indiana? However you found it consider yourself lucky, its a great car.

You should have no problem getting better than 55 mpg with the phev. Unless you're just referring to mpg in hev mode, but that will be tricky to calculate since the car doesn't track miles driven in each mode.

A maintenance minder based on actual car statistics would be great. But I don't think Hyundai wants to reduce your visits to the service dept.

I don't understand your point 2. AC does not require use of gas engine, am I missing something?

I've read the threads about using the included slow charger with 240 volts. What I read made sense as they said the same charger is used in other countries. But I would be hesitant to try it also. Anyway I charge overnight so it makes no difference to me if it takes 6 hours instead of 3.

Enjoy your new car. Welcome to the neighborhood.
 

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2019 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in
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Discussion Starter #6
Hi again @cybaker

Thanks @ecocentric . Agreed, it's a minimal maintenance minder, and thanks for the schooling on observable metrics. I'm guessing #3 is cost related, but even 50W is minor draw compared to the EV motor at 50kW (60 hp). So there's a factor of 1000 difference for the 0.05kW light, and another order of magnitude for the LED. Yes, that's getting chintzy. 99.90% vs 99.99% consumption difference. I'll live with that if the brightness is as good as LEDs. The price difference seems maybe double for LEDs, but in bulk the difference may be about $10 US. But I'd take this over a Prius any day. I like the interior, the exterior is as good as a civic except maybe the front grill, roomier inside too.
Perhaps my comment was not worded that well. My complaint is not that they did not use LED headlights but that they did not use the EXISTING DRL LEDs for the approach light and instead chose to use the 50W halogen headlamps. In any case, I wish to not go on about this any further. I wrote about my whines in the initial note but overall I am pleased with the vehicle. I did a lot of research before deciding on the Ioniq (and in particular, the PHEV). :)
 

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2019 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in
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Discussion Starter #7
Welcome to the forum ecocentric. How did you find a phev in Indiana? However you found it consider yourself lucky, its a great car.
[...]
Enjoy your new car. Welcome to the neighborhood.
Hi @Jonboy, thank you! I actually bought the vehicle from a dealer near Baltimore, MD, and had it delivered to my house. :)

You should have no problem getting better than 55 mpg with the phev. Unless you're just referring to mpg in hev mode, but that will be tricky to calculate since the car doesn't track miles driven in each mode.
Ah, good point about the trickiness in calculating gasoline MPG. I am confident too given we got better than EPA estimates on our Civic hybrids (even the overly liberal estimates from the 2008 model).

A maintenance minder based on actual car statistics would be great. But I don't think Hyundai wants to reduce your visits to the service dept.
Yeah, but it's a bummer because modern synthetic oils are so good these days, many get 10-12k miles on Mobil1 0W-20 oil (or the like). Granted I used to only get 7500-8500 miles so to me it should not make much of a difference. I should not have whined about it. ;-)

I don't understand your point 2. AC does not require use of gas engine, am I missing something?
From what I've gathered, the vehicle does not have an additional electric compressor like our Civic Hybrids did (and used for light A/C use), and relies on the more traditional engine/belt driven compressor if you do turn on the A/C. Someone more knowledgeable including yourself, please correct me if I am wrong. It's possible, this is how it is in the American model.

I've read the threads about using the included slow charger with 240 volts. What I read made sense as they said the same charger is used in other countries. But I would be hesitant to try it also. Anyway I charge overnight so it makes no difference to me if it takes 6 hours instead of 3.
Right, I have the same concerns especially because it clearly lists INPUT Voltage as 120 V and not 110-240 V like some other charging devices do (for e.g. laptop power adapters take 110-240 V). My goal is to charge as much as possible with solar during the day but even that should be viable with the light charger given this is just a PHEV and not an EV.

Thanks again for your feedback. Stay safe!
 
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