Hyundai IONIQ Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As the title states, I just ( yesterday ) purchased a Cyber Gray SE (really want to find a cargo cover - why is that hard?)

I have many questions, and I could be embarrassed about not knowing the basics, but let me start with these two (and a half).

1) The manual does a good job scaring me about not using DC chargers too much because they can degrade the batteries.
  1. DC Chargers- those are the chargers I see at supermarkets / malls ( Charge America ! )
  2. Is the statement true? Do I want to minimize using these types of chargers and rely more on AC charging.
  3. AC charging is home charging I presume?
2) Home chargers. I see something called a NeoCharger Smart Splitter. For someone looking for the simplest way to get a charger in my house, would that work?
  1. It looks like I need two pieces - the "NeoCharger" plus another "charger" to plugin to the "NeoCharger" that I then plugin to my car. What are recommended chargers that would work in this case
  2. What are the downsides of using something like a NeoCharger? i.e.... if I have a dedicated electrician come out to do an install, do I get something "better" --- such as faster charging because he creates more magic power in my breaker box?
2.5) For general driving when I know I'm not going a long distance, should I be keeping the battery at no more than 80% charged?
 

·
Registered
2022 IONIQ5 Limited AWD Cyber Gray
Joined
·
581 Posts
1) We've gone back and forth about this often. Some of us are fast charging frequently because it's free. Others are worried about it because of previous EV experiences. I've split the difference and just fast charge to 80% at the 150 kW charger and plug into Level 1 after and let it balance the battery hoping that keeps it healthy. Home chargers connect to the car via AC yes - well except the ford lightening but that only uses the two DC pins to back charge a home in the even of an outage.

2) My understanding is these take a 240 outlet and allow two things to plug into them with the expectation that you would charge during off peak hours and do laundry during peak hours. NeoCharger is just saving you the $350+/- of having an electrician run another 240 outlet. Depending on the amperage an electrician could provide higher amperage to a dedicated EV charger potentially depending on what your box can handle.

2.5) Yup, basically everyone seems to agree on the 20-80% sweet spot for resting and daily battery use. I drove 200 miles today so I topped it off to 100% last night in anticipation of that today. Also beyond 80% the charging curve falls off on all EVs due to battery heat and need to balance the pack which takes time.

Congratulations!
 

·
Premium Member
'22 Ioniq 5 SE RWD (formerly '21 Ioniq PHEV SEL)
Joined
·
154 Posts
Welcome to the world of the I5 and EVs!

First of all, please check out the sticky note for all new I5 owners on this forum:

Answers to Common Questions Including Range and Battery...

To briefly answer your questions:

1. DC Fast chargers are extremely useful for road trips and for those who don't have regular access to charging at their home. You should somewhat limit your use in general, however, it's not as scary as the manual makes it out to be. It's a cumulative effect over time that can add a little bit of degradation to the battery over the years. If you need to use your car and the only option is to DC Fast Charge, then absolutely do it and don't worry about it. In fact, your I5 should come with 2 years of free DC Fast charging with a company called, "Electrify America". You will need to sign up for this service and register your vehicle. Ask your dealer for help with this. They literally gave me a photocopy of the manual Hyundai sent them to help their customers. Then you have access to "FREE" electricity (although Hyundai almost certainly paid for it and included it in the price of the car you paid). It's great though and can save you some money on road trips, although the reliability of their chargers still leaves something to be desired. You should register your car and go charge at one to see how it works. There's a bit of a learning curve that you need to go through. It won't hurt your car. Just don't do it every day if you can help it. Save it mainly for road trips and urgent top ups if possible.

AC charging is what you would have at home correct, although there are a great many public AC chargers you can use as well. Some are free, some are expensive, it all depends. I actually charge my I5 almost exclusively on free public AC chargers since there a good number available where I live and where I like to go often. I also only charge it up by a few percent at a time, but I do it often so it keeps my battery level up. "ABC" = "Always be Charging". It's not like a gasoline car where you always run it to nearly out then fill it up to the top.

2. In setting up home charging, first determine what kind of charging you can install. You can always charge on a standard household 120 V outlet using the included Level 1 EVSE that came with your car, but it will take forever since the power delivery is limited to 12 Amps. You probably want to install a 240 Volt "Level 2" charger in your home if you can. Here's a primer on that:

Level 1 vs Level 2 EV Charging Stations

If you want a level 2 charger, you'll most likely need a licensed electrician to install the appropriate 240 V outlet in your garage / driveway. The charging rate will be determined by what power you have available at your house, what EVSE you get, and what amperage you choose to wire for. An electrician can help guide you. A higher power EVSE and the subsequent install will be more expensive. My recommendation is to have the electrician install a NEMA 14-30 or NEMA 14-50 outlet, depending on the amperage you want. Just make sure it matches the plug on the EVSE you choose. Getting the outlet installed is a lot more flexible than wiring an EVSE directly. If you have a free "dryer" outlet, you may be able to use this or use a splitter that allows you to switch between your dryer and your charger (can't do both simultaneously). Ask an electrician about this if you don't know what you're doing, you don't want to draw to much current and blow your breaker. Once you have the outlet installed professionally and properly matched to the EVSE of your choice, simply plug it in and then plug in your vehicle and start charging.

2.5. In general it's a good idea to not charge your car to 100% on a regular basis. 80% is good for daily use if you don't need the range. If you do charge above that, it's OK, just don't leave the car sitting for days or weeks at that high state of charge. So, if you charge up high, do it for a reason and use that electricity. A great example would be to charge up to 100% the night before a road trip, which will give you some extra range. If you leave the car sitting for an extended period, consider putting it in the 40 - 60 % range, which will put less strain on the battery as it sits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you @zamafir and @nlc201 for the detailed responses.

Seems like I need a charging plan going forward -
Hyundai did indeed supply us with 2 years of "Electrify America" and the nearest charger is only 2 miles away. I was assuming the wife and I would do the bulk of our charging there.

What I'm hearing is - for long trips yes, for "need it now" maybe cap to 80%, otherwise look at home AC chargers or find a map for public AC chargers.

Now, if I can catch an image of the weird small-red-circle-icon in the top right of the right screen so I can ask what the **** it means... that'll be my next topic. LOL
 

·
Registered
2022 IONIQ 5 Limited
Joined
·
22 Posts
I won't disagree with the others who have posted on this thread, but I'll add a slight twist that I've encountered.

We're hardwiring our home 14-50 EV charging equipment (EVSE), but in my county in Maryland, an electrical permit is required for Level 2 chargers that are hardwired, and the work must be done by a licensed electrician. So the first hurdle has been waiting for the county permit to be approved and waiting for the electrician's time availability. In addition to this, our home's electrical panel did not have a large enough amperage capability for the additional EVSE, so we're having to "heavy-up" our electrical panel-- basically have the electrical panel and service upgraded to a higher amperage-- which again, requires a county permit and electrical company coordination. Thankfully, the same electrician is doing the EVSE and heavy-up work at the same time, but all that has added to the delay in actually having a home Level 2 EVSE station available for use.

Did I mention I got my I5 at the end of March? :) Thankfully, I telework most of the time, so I'm not driving the car every day. I don't want to leave my I5 overnight at a public Level 2 charging station, so I've been DC fast charging (free Electrify America, 150kW) when I hit about 25% battery and only going up to 80% charge. This is usually every couple weeks, because I like to get out and drive it for fun sometimes! But every other charging time, I trickle charge it for several days. I'm really not that concerned about the amount of DC fast charging I'm doing

I share all that to convey that some Level 2 home charger installations are more complicated and time-consuming than others. It all depends on what kind of charging setup you want and what your local electrical code requires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Thank you @zamafir and @nlc201 for the detailed responses.
Everything they said seems right to me (haven't purchased our Ioniq 5 yet 😢), but I would also add that Level 1 (120V) charging, at 3-4 miles of range added per hour, should give you 40-60 miles overnight, and maybe that's enough for your use, augmented by the EA chargers?

We did already wire a 240V NEMA 14-50 outlet where our car will be (no permit required here for that), but that was because we were having other electrical work done.

There are several threads here about the trade-offs of hard-wiring versus outlets, and the different EVSEs (so. many. choices.), from people with actual experience in each.

BTW, consensus seems to be you don't need a smart charger, as the car does most of what you need, but the extra features can be nice if the extra cost is not an issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Thank you @zamafir and @nlc201 for the detailed responses.

Seems like I need a charging plan going forward -
Hyundai did indeed supply us with 2 years of "Electrify America" and the nearest charger is only 2 miles away. I was assuming the wife and I would do the bulk of our charging there.

What I'm hearing is - for long trips yes, for "need it now" maybe cap to 80%, otherwise look at home AC chargers or find a map for public AC chargers.

Now, if I can catch an image of the weird small-red-circle-icon in the top right of the right screen so I can ask what the **** it means... that'll be my next topic. LOL
Depends on your intent for the car. There are plenty of Youtubers that have reached 100k miles using DC fast charging as the majority of charging sessions and their degradation is higher...like 2-3% higher after 100k miles? Overall, can't say thats much and if you only intend to keep the car for 5 years, who cares...charge away. If you want to keep this for 10+ years, then probably want to minimize charging over 60-70% for daily use and make sure your average state of the battery hovers at 50% or below (higher charge levels contribute to higher calendar aging on batteries but below, 50%, calendar aging is very minimal).

There is actually a science to avoiding degradation but since most people don't keep their cars longer than 5 or 6 years, it probably doesn't matter to the first owner.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top