Hyundai IONIQ Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wanted to post this article to summarise my thoughts now that we have had our Ioniq EV Premium SE for two weeks and ask for feedback from everyone to see if they are having a similar experience.

Firstly, to set the scene a little, we have had the car for 2 weeks, we live in the South West of England and the weather has been around 0 to 10 degrees Celsius over this time. We have previously owned plug-in hybrids but this is our first pure EV. We have been wanting one for a long time, I guess I have just got to that point in life where I realise what a terrible idea it is to keep burning fossil fuels, polluting our air and destroying the planet.

So, onto the Ioniq, Overall I am very pleased with the car, I love driving it, think its great value for money and I am totally sold on the fact that EV’s are the way forward.

We have had a couple little issues with the car, the main issue is with the charge port, there seems to be a fault with the locking pin that is stopping the charge cable from being removed when the vehicle is unlocked. On one occasion it jammed so badly even the emergency release would not work and the AA needed to come and dismantle the car to release it. This is an isolated fault that the garage will fix and I have no issue with it.

We bought the Ioniq hoping it could be our main vehicle, very excited at the prospect of a “reasonably” priced EV being able to replace our combustion engine car. With the quoted range of c170 Miles and frequent rapid chargers this would have been feasible. We drive around 16k miles a year, most local but we like to travel further afield on weekends away.

The first problem was that the Ecotricity app that is used for most of the chargers on the UK motorway network shows all CCS and AC chargers as compatible with the car and there are lots. The problem is AC charging in the IONIQ takes around 4.5 hours so they are no use for a quick stop. Ecotricity charge £6.50 for 30 minutes of charging so I cannot see how you would ever want to charge the Ioniq on their AC chargers as it would cost a small fortune and take a long time.

The CCS chargers that are reportedly able to charge to 80% in 30 minutes are a lot less common and where you do find them there is often only one, this leads to the single point of failure we experienced this weekend at Exeter services when the pump failed to operate due to a communication problem with the network and did not failover to “Free to vend” as it should. Ecotricity who run the pumps do not offer support out of office hours so we were left with insufficient range to make it to the next CCS charger and no option other than to sit in the services for over an hour paying for multiple sessions on the AC charger to gain the 10 miles of extra range we needed to get to the next CCS charger.

All of this is of course nothing to do with the Ioniq other than to say there are far more Chademo connectors in the UK than CCS although I acknowledge CCS seems to be the new standard and this will improve.

The range of the Ioniq is the point I am most disappointed in and I am really keen for feedback to see if anyone else is having a similar experience.

I have been looking at the EV market for some time and there is an ever improving and increased range of vehicles but most of the “reasonably” priced (i.e. non-Tesla) options seemed to always hover around the 80 to 100-mile point in terms of range. The Ioniq seemed to be pushing that to the next level that actually promised with a small amount of planning and compromise to make this EV a genuine option as our main car.

I never expected to get 170 miles range but was hoping for 150 or maybe even 130 on the motorway.

Up to this weekend we had mainly been doing local driving around our city with a few trips to the airport. On Friday, we set off on our twice monthly trip from Bristol to Devon. This was the first trip we would travel beyond the normal range of the Ioniq, that has been up to this point stated by the car as 117 miles when fully charged. We would, for the first time be reliant on the public infrastructure to complete our journey.

I did not believe the navigation system when sat at home on the driveway in Bristol with the car showing 117 miles range on a full charge it said we would not make it to Exeter services without stopping to charge. That was only 86 miles away so I ignored the warning knowing even with the higher motorway speeds we had more than enough range to make it. Sure enough, the journey started on “A” and “B” roads averaging 33 MPH through the city for about 15 miles then onto the motorway driving at around 72MPH but to my surprise we only just made it to Exeter with low battery warning and 3 miles left.

I know the cold is a factor and it will be better in the summer but we were very frugal, no heating, just heated seats and Eco mode all the way. I know I could extend the range by reducing speed and will try that next time, but sitting on the motorway doing 56 miles per hour is not an option I want to consider. That said we did make it to our destination but the battery was so low that a single CCS charge at Exeter only took us to 61% so we had to wait an hour for the second charge session to take us to 94%. All this said and whilst a little concerned over the range and having to CCS charge twice it was an OK journey.

The return trip sadly was the one described where the only CCS charger at Exeter failed us and a Journey that took us 2.5 hours last week in the petrol car yesterday took 5 hours.

In summary, the poor range and lack of out of business hours support for the CCS chargers just means this is not a vehicle we would gladly take on long distances again, we will of course try it but with some worry and concern on the way.

The issue I now face is a very sad one for an avid fan of electric vehicles, it’s looking like we will need to buy a second car sooner than planned and at the moment I am faced with either buying a petrol car (albeit probably plug-in hybrid) or somehow finding the courage to invest a large amount of money in the Tesla as this seems to me currently to be the only option of a car with good enough range and a fully supported charging infrastructure that can be relied upon.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,795 Posts
Indeed, for any BEV car the range is very dependent on your speed of driving and the outdoor temperature. It is good to read about experiences of others reported in the topic about the Ioniq EV's range in order to build a realistic intuition about it, and to prevent other disappointments in the future.
 
  • Like
Reactions: blownb310

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,252 Posts
welcome Lhodgkins


interesting thoughts, I must admit I have the hybrid but thought there were more CCS chargers around than there are


googling the ecotricity chargers seems to show they report time on charge, but not the KWh transferred but they do charge, lots of comments about them on the web


have a look at http://www.ioniqforum.com/forum/23689-post59.html the graph will give you a good idea of range based on real data from members


its a shame that the charging infrastructure has put a negative on a good car
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
This is exactly the reason I will go with a hybrid for now, even though I have a private garage with a power outlet. The problem for me are long journeys >350km, to the airport and back or excursions to other cities etc. I don't want to risk being stranded on the German/French highways just because the infrastructure is not built out yet, or because the charger is not working.
But I admire the contribution to the development that you early adopters are doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I did a lot of research before we decided to go for the EV and don't regret it for a second. Its a lovely car and is ideal for 90% of our driving. I must admit I did not realise quite what a dramatic effect the ambient temperature had on the range before we purchased. The infrastructure will improve and you never know we may actually be lucky enough to have a summer this year and I can enjoy the extended range that comes with some warm weather! :eek:)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,252 Posts
the other thing, did you set the car to pre-heat the cabin?
as one of the biggest things that seems to affect range in cold weather is the initial heating of the interior of the car?


perhaps if you do this and maybe drop 5mph on the motorway section you may get better range and make taunton dean services


I hadn't realised the charger at supermarkets were only fast, not rapid chargers


are the supermarket charger compatible with the Ioniq? all be it 4 hours + for a full charge
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi bluecar1,

yes, I pre-heated the cabin, it was lovely and warm when I got in!

This is the problem the the chargers, the Ioniq will only fast charge to 60-80% in 30 minutes with the CCS connector on a DC 50KW rapid charger. Whilst all the other type 2 AC connectors will fit and charge the car the Ionic onboard charger will take 4.5 hours to charge the car from an AC supply. Even if the AC supply is 50KW the charger can only draw around 7KW.

Taunton services don't have a CCS charger, the only ones between Bristol and Dartmouth on the M5 are Sedgemoor by junction 21 and Exeter at junction 30. I could happily live with one 30 minute stop on the return journey but its looking like I will need to make 3 or 4 due to the locations of the chargers on this 240 mile round trip as there are no chargers at our destination.

I am sure I can coax a little more out of the range but it does not help when the only CCS rapid charger at your destination does not work and there is no support number out of hours. That's a bigger problem than the range issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
@lhodgkins I'm sorry to hear of your troubles. I've been doing a lot of research prior to buying an EV and I have the exact same concerns. I frequently make trips between Tucson and Phoenix, AZ. Looking at plugshare.com data/comments it would appear that the majority of charging stations between the 2 cities are either down for repair, only 1 (if that) of 2-3 plugs at any given location actually work, and the 1 that does is usually an L2 charger. Most of the screens are non-functional or extremely faded due to getting blasted by the hot Arizona sun all day every day. There are very few L3 chargers but most are down a good portion of the time. It also would seem that when they do break, they are extremely slow to be fixed as it can literally take several months sometimes. Other times, once they break they seem all but abandoned and have been down for 6 months or more. The Tesla chargers are plenty, are maintained, and are very well strategically placed between cities. But, we can't use them. And as you said, L2 chargers just really aren't feasible because I can't sit and wait for an hour for an L2 charger to give me maybe 20-25 miles worth of driving.

Hyundai says that the EV can get up to 110 miles on the highway, but that is in perfect conditions and their definition of "highway speeds" is probably only 55-65mph. Here, we MUST have air conditioning going at all times and the majority of the highway speeds are 75mph (and we go about 80mph) between the 2 cities. Plus the range could be affected by the extreme high temps here. I'd honestly be surprised if I got 75-80 miles on a charge with those tough conditions. To add to all of that frustration, you've got the cost. Electricity is cheap, but these chargers are not. I see folks posting that it's common to cost $11.95 for a 30 minute charge. Many of these cost (even for an L2) $5.95 just to "hook up" in addition to per minute usage. Some of the charging networks even require month-to-month fees! That's the estimated equivalent of spending $6 per gallon of "gas" for my EV on an L3 charger--3 times more than gas for my hybrid costs!

Now, on my Prius c, I can easily get 40-45mph between the cities in the most extreme conditions (90mph on the highway, 120 degree weather, driving aggressively, AC on full blast). At a cost of $2 per gallon of gas, I can easily fill up my car from bone dry empty for less than $20. And in the worst conditions, I'd get at least 380 miles, more than enough to make the round trip with room to spare and no stopping for gas.

So why the heck am I still considering an EV with all of those negatives? I've come to the conclusion that IF I get the EV that it absolutely, positively, is my back and forth to work and make small trips into town vehicle ONLY. I would only charge at home. We must keep a 2nd gas-powered vehicle for the longer trips. Each car with its own purpose. With that mindset, I feel I could easily love my Ioniq EV if the price is right to purchase one when released in the US.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
DaveAZ - I thank your for researching a lot of details that I had wondered about .... but not researched on my own.

For all of the above reasons, I am not interested in a EV. My brother owns a Tesla A90S (or something like that) and he dos not go to far from home .... never on the highway.

I previously owned a 2010 Prius and enjoyed it so much I traded it on a 2015 Toyota Avalon hybrid. Great road car. And, a EV would work for me as a town car ... but I think I will stick with the hybrid, save initial cost, and enjoy it around town as much as possible (and save the miles that are accumulating on the TAH. It already has 50,000 miles.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,252 Posts
this is the old chicken and egg issue, you need to have the infrastructure in place before people can buy the EV's,but before the infrastructure can be put I place there needs to be EV's to use it


London / southeast I think there is more than around the west country as there are more EV's
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top