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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After 2.700 km (about 1677 miles)

Trip computer average consumption between
4.2 l/100km and 4.4 l/100km
56 MPG (US) and 53.5 MPG (US)
67.26 MPG (UK) and 64.2 MPG (UK)

Less than expected after reading some europeans reviews :|
 

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Marina Blue HEV Ltd IONIQ from 25 Jul '17
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After 2.700 km (about 1677 miles)

Trip computer average consumption between
4.2 l/100km and 4.4 l/100km
56 MPG (US) and 53.5 MPG (US)
67.26 MPG (UK) and 64.2 MPG (UK)

Less than expected after reading some europeans reviews :|
I'm in Canada and have driven just over 2000 km now, and my trip computer shows similar averages. And I'm very impressed as well, since the Canadian marketing material advertises 4.3 City/4.4 Hwy/4.4 Combined. This is the first car I've owned that actually seems to meet and exceed the advertised economy. On my old Elantra, I could exceed Hwy spec on occasion, but City and Combined were always worse than the advertised.

On my current tank in the Ioniq, I'm currently showing an average of 4.1 L/100 km, which so far has been my best sustained average.

However, when I fill up at the pump I'm noticing an increase of 0.3 L/100 km when I enter my fill up on Fuelly over what my the car's computer tells me. But this is based only on two fill-ups so far. So I'm hoping as I drive more and gas up more, that gap will narrow. My first two fill-ups my car's computer said 4.5 and 4.4 respectively. I expect to fill up again this Thursday, and hope to maintain 4.1 on the car's computer until then. It's edged up to 4.2 a couple of times (usually first thing in the morning), but has settled back to 4.1 after a bit.

I find it's all about bringing your driving habits in line with the car, and the car meanwhile adapts as much as it can to your driving style during the break-in period. I find driving economically on the Ioniq is quite a different process from driving economically in a regular ICE car as it's more about looking for ways to maximise the electric motor and battery usage over simply trying to feather the accelerator all the time.
 
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I know what you mean - among other things I teach students how to maximise range with the ICE on motorcycles. It involves NOT closing the throttle and coasting as you might think (engine braking and friction works against even on a downhill slope) but instead utilise a `coast+` approach, based on power needed to sustain a speed is considerably less than that required to accelerate to it in the first place.
So, reach the speed you need then back the throttle off to the point where the speed starts to decay, add a tiny amount to maintain rather than lose speed and leave it there. Years ago I had a chance to measure the throttle opening while doing some R&D work with a bike manufacturer and with a throttle position sensor fitted as part of the reporting package and at the test track the difference was between 7% throttle and 15%. Doesn't sound like a lot but it makes a difference.

It works with ICE cars also.

Tried the same technique early on with the Ioniq and it does not work: With the Hybrid even the lightest foot pressure on the accelerator moves the regen from the blue bar (feeding) to the green bar (using) so you have to coast fully foot-off else it's using battery power when it could be recovering it...

I wonder whether that's why the counter-intuitive results of using the ACC when it appears to be using the ICE more actually delivers better mileage? It's making a clear distinction between power and no-power?

Certainly for mpg seekers first step is be aware of your accelerator pedal for more than just acceleration.
 
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Slow down. Seriously. The difference between 100km/h and 85km/h is a liter per 100km. We rarely drive faster than 90 in the car, and the last 3 fill-ups have been 1:28 (3.57l/100km, 65mpg US, 79 mpg UK). As you can see from my signature (or from here) we (also) started off higher, and arer slowly getting better numbers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
3rd fuel tank

60% highway
40% city
70km per day

71% Economy
28% Normal
1% Aggresive

Getting better.

Trip computer average consumption between
4.1 l/100km and 4.2 l/100km
57.37 MPG (US) and 56 MPG (US)
68.90 MPG (UK) and 67.26 MPG (UK)

:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Winter fuel tank (0ºC-5ºC) and 14300km

60% highway
40% city
70km per day

61% Economy
38% Normal
1% Aggresive

Getting better.

Trip computer average consumption between
4.5 l/100km and 4.7 l/100km
52.27 MPG (US) and 50.04 MPG (US)
63.77 MPG (UK) and 60.10 MPG (UK)

I don't think the cold feels too good.:eek:
 

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Nope, we know she doesn't like cold weather or winter fuel blends, but it's about right for the mileage and that pattern of use.

Mine was still improving mpg was past 16,000 miles / 26,000 km so you can expect further improvements as the weather warms.
 
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