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Hi,

Just brought our new Ioniq PHEV home and read manual last night. Under charging it says:

Household current: Do not use for normal charging (only for emergencies).

I was under the assumption we could charge overnight without a problem. Or will charging with a household damage the battery over time?

All info online and from what sales poeple told us charging from household outlet with the Hyundai cable is no problem?
 

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It's not about the battery, but electrical safety when used as a a "permanent solution" for home charging.

This topic is discussed other threads like this one.
 

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there's no problem with 3 pin plug in charger, its just slower! thats all we have at work, when I used it at home before my 7kw pod-point was fitted, the plug and socket in my garage did get warm, not to hot to touch but still a concern.
 

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That indeed is the main concern, that after many hours warm gets hot and hot turns into fire. The often used wires and sockets in houses may not allow so many hours of heavy load.
 
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Hi,

Just brought our new Ioniq PHEV home and read manual last night. Under charging it says:

Household current: Do not use for normal charging (only for emergencies).

I was under the assumption we could charge overnight without a problem. Or will charging with a household damage the battery over time?

All info online and from what sales poeple told us charging from household outlet with the Hyundai cable is no problem?
As knutsp states its about safety, if the earth (ground) connection fails it is possible for the body of car to become live in certain fault conditions. For this reason it is recommended that the supply socket used to feed the ICCB charger has the protection of a Residual current device (RCD), the same as you would do for electric lawn mowers or hedge trimmers.

It might be better if Hyundai incorporated an RCD into the ICCB charger (a RCD plugtop perhaps)

https://www.electricalsafetyfirst.org.uk/guides-and-advice/around-the-home/rcds-explained/
 

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As many have pointed out here, it is about the safety of your house. I regularly charge my BEV with the level 1 charger provided. I have a dedicated 20A line (AWG 12/3 wire) to the garage with a 20A circuit breaker socket, which is used to charge my car.
 

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The car maker can't endorse your home charging simply because it doesn't know about it.

A dedicated line and suitable wiring is perfectly suitable, just not as effective as a level 2 charger which, presumably, has been installed by a competent person.
 

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As many have pointed out here, it is about the safety of your house. I regularly charge my BEV with the level 1 charger provided. I have a dedicated 20A line (AWG 12/3 wire) to the garage with a 20A circuit breaker socket, which is used to charge my car.
The important point is to ensure that the circuit is NOT just protected by a standard Circuit Breaker but has a combined CB and RCD or separate RCD (Residual Current Device) or Ground Fault Protection, I think, in American speak. That will protect Human safety which is even more important than house safety.0:)
 

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1. Sockets and their wiring/circuit, even outdoor sockets installed for lawn mower or car/engine preheaters etc, is not intended for long time (several hours) full load of current, and completely unattended at night, as can happen with vehicle chargers. The risk of overheating and fire is regarded too high.

2. The cable/ICCB may hang from the outlet socket, which is a wear and tear hazard in the long run (years).

This is why household sockets for regular car charging is prohibited in Norway, as new installations. Existing sockets may be used, on permanent basis, if, and only if, 1) the circuit is equipped with a special type of ground fault protector (usually not installed on such), plus 2) that the fuse on the circuit is (reduced to) 10 A, plus 3) no other sockets or equipment on the same circuit (dedicated).

Hyundai and dealers don't properly inform on this, and the extra cost, usually the for a proper home charger, installed according to regulations.
 

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1. Sockets and their wiring/circuit, even outdoor sockets installed for lawn mower or car/engine preheaters etc, is not intended for long time (several hours) full load of current, and completely unattended at night, as can happen with vehicle chargers. The risk of overheating and fire is regarded too high.

2. The cable/ICCB may hang from the outlet socket, which is a wear and tear hazard in the long run (years).

This is why household sockets for regular car charging is prohibited in Norway, as new installations. Existing sockets may be used, on permanent basis, if, and only if, 1) the circuit is equipped with a special type of ground fault protector (usually not installed on such), plus 2) that the fuse on the circuit is (reduced to) 10 A, plus 3) no other sockets or equipment on the same circuit (dedicated).

Hyundai and dealers don't properly inform on this, and the extra cost, usually the for a proper home charger, installed according to regulations.
My stance on this topic, still.
 

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My stance on this topic, still.
In principle I agree with you. Last summer, a house burnt down in Sunne in Sweden due to the charging of a car from an ordinary household outlet. However, it may not have been the outlet itself that caused the fire. They admit that they had problems with the main fuses blowing when they did their laundry at the same time as charging the car. So they plugged a timer in the outlet to switch the car charging on at night. That timer might have been rated too low, and the cause of the fire.

I would love to install a proper charger at my house, but it's not really possible due to the surcharges of the electricity company. I can very well afford the one time cost of the charger and the installation, but not the subsequent monthly fees that it leads to.

Today, I have 16 Amps main fuses. In order to install a charger, I would have to raise the main fuses to at least 20 Amps. That would also raise the fixed monthly fee from 165 SEK to 605 SEK.

If I have to pay 440 SEK extra for electricity every month just to charge the car, I might as well run on petrol...
 

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This topic is revealing WHY it is necessary that posters include all relevant information with their post - particularly their location and installed charging parameters.

Here in the UK, with a 240 volt system I would not recommend charging at high rating for long periods of time - the wiring is not suitable and frankly, the quality of the electrician who installed it is questionable. A 120 volt system, typical in the USA and in places in Europe and talking in general terms is NOT suitable as a daily charger, except at low rates.

That being said, I use a 30-amp ring main, intended for cookers, with dual 8mm cabling and a dedicated plug socket, previously installed in my garage.

Having had the wiring checked by a `real` electrician (who pointed out the RCD elsewhere in the loom dedicated to the cooker ring and confirmed the connection was directly to a local feed and not a shared ring) I am satisfied that away from peak load it is perfectly suitable for charging. And that's only because I have no wish to impose peak load on a domestic system - I simply avoid peak load by ensuring I charge when NOT using the hob rings and oven at the same time. I have also witnessed first-hand a number of home-installed chargers from so-called `reputable` suppliers who don't actually install but farm it out to sub-contractors, who vary in competence from abysmal to appalling. I would trust them even less than a domestic `expert`...

There is no substitute for correct advice and proper research, WHATEVER you are installing or contemplating using. :nerd:
 
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This topic is revealing WHY it is necessary that posters include all relevant information with their post - particularly their location and installed charging parameters.

Here in the UK, with a 240 volt system I would not recommend charging at high rating for long periods of time - the wiring is not suitable and frankly, the quality of the electrician who installed it is questionable. A 120 volt system, typical in the USA and in places in Europe and talking in general terms is NOT suitable as a daily charger, except at low rates.

That being said, I use a 30-amp ring main, intended for cookers, with dual 8mm cabling and a dedicated plug socket, previously installed in my garage.

Having had the wiring checked by a real electrician (who pointed out the RCD elsewhere in the loom dedicated to the cooker ring and confirmed the connection was directly to a local feed and not a shared ring) I am satisfied that away from peak load it is perfectly suitable for charging. And that's only because I have no wish to impose peak load on a domestic system - I simply avoid peak load by ensuring I charge when NOT using the hob rings and oven at the same time. I have also witnessed first-hand a number of home-installed chargers from so-called reputable suppliers who don't actually install but farm it out to sub-contractors, who vary in competence from abysmal to appalling. I would trust them even less than a domestic expert...

There is no substitute for correct advice and proper research, WHATEVER you are installing or contemplating using. ?
I was recommended to install a dedicated ring main (32amp) to supply a 7kw home installed charger but a Hyundai garage. They recon that they have had problems with Ioniqs and that a separate dedicated ring is needed. Have you heard of this?

Wouldn't it be sufficient to install a dedicated single 32 amp cable with a dedicated local earth?

Any advice would be gratefully appreciated for this newly!
 

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Yes, a 32 amp cable should work, as long as the earth isn't part of the house standard ring main. The only thing to check is the cable doesn't get too hot after a long period on charge, as its about the system as a whole rather than any single component.
As I said above I have mine on a dedicated cooker main which operates at about 30 amps
and can cope with a 3.7 kw charger with ease - my plug barely gets warm, let alone hot. But that's for a PHEV which only gets charged on the plug a couple if times a month...

The above advice works for a UK 240-volt system and as yet we have no idea where Simonspad is corresponding from?
 

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I used to be a qualified electrician (Ed 17), , here is my take on this, based on my knowledge and experience:

1. I have been using a Mercedes PHEV charger for over 6 months with no problems here in UK (initially from a wall socket running into the house and then from an external circuit my son installed - He is Ed. 18 qualified). There are no such warnings on the Mercedes charger, so I was surprised to see the warning on the Hyundai charger when we got my wife's brand new Ioniq EV home yesterday.
2. I agree with other posters this is about Hyundai protecting themselves from the implications of charging at 10A+ for long periods of time if your home installation is not set up for it.

If you are charging in the US, then 110V is going to seriously limit you and I would not recommend charging from a 110V supply, Hyundai state the emergency charger is 2.3kW, so at 110V it will draw a maximum of 21 Amps, better to use a 220/230V supply and draw a nominal 10A.
If you are in UK (2220-240V) the UK plug is more than capable of delivering 10A for a sustained period of time, you probably need to be a bit more careful in some parts of Europe where the wring standards in the past were not so rigidly enforced. Plugging into a standard socket, unless your wiring dates back to the before 1970's, it will be protected by the appropriate fuse or breaker, so if you blow the fuse or trip the breaker don't use that socket again and definitely don't bypass the safety devices. If your wiring is older than 20 years however, I would recommend you get it checked first by a competent electrician.
In the UK, if you have a socket in the garden, that was professionally installed, then it will be connected via an RCD that will disconnect the power should a ground fault occur, If it trips and then trips again when you reset it then there is problem with you car or your charger. It should be connected to a circuit breaker of at least 20A for one socket and 32 Amps for two sockets, so should be more than adequate to supply your emergency charger, so I cannot see any problems with running off an external socket.

In my particular case, because I knew we planned to get an EV, I had a 40 Amp breaker put in my main box, then ran a 60 A capable cable to an external box connected to a 32A ring main with two sockets and a 6A spur for lighting. I am currently running both cars off this ring main with no issues, the Merc charger is 3kw (I believe, Mercedes give you even less information than Hyundai, but it cant be much more than this as it is limited by the 13A fuse in the plug) and the Hyundai charger is stated at 2.3kW, so that a total of 5.3kW on a ring that is capable of supporting 7.3Kw.
I have ordered the 7kW charger, but it has not been installed yet.

Hope this helps

David
 

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If you are charging in the US, then 110V is going to seriously limit you and I would not recommend charging from a 110V supply, Hyundai state the emergency charger is 2.3kW, so at 110V it will draw a maximum of 21 Amps, better to use a 220/230V supply and draw a nominal 10A.
2.3kW doesn't sound right. The ICCB charger can be set at 8, 10 or 12A, and should at the maximum setting provide a little less than 2.8kW at 230V.

At 110-120V it will still draw no more than 12A, so the charging will be limited to around 1.3-1.4 kW. It will take a long time to charge your car that way. That's why some people in the States use adapters to connect the ICCB charger to a 240V outlet, or to two 120V outlets with opposite phases.
 

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You might be correct on this, I do not have a USA charger to refer to as I am in UK, but if as Hyundai state for the new model, the charger is 2300 Watts, then at 230V it's 10A. It is possible, but would be ridiculous to have a 1400 Watt charger, it would take nearly 30 hours to charge the newer 38kW/h battery.
 

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You might be correct on this, I do not have a USA charger to refer to as I am in UK, but if as Hyundai state for the new model, the charger is 2300 Watts, then at 230V it's 10A. It is possible, but would be ridiculous to have a 1400 Watt charger, it would take nearly 30 hours to charge the newer 38kW/h battery.
Looking in the manual, there appear to be three different types of ICCB chargers - "Type A", "Type B", and "Type C". They all have three settings, but not the same levels. So I guess the one you've been looking at is the "Type B" which has a maximum current of 10A. Interesting, I didn't know that.
31881

I have the "Type A" version with a maximum current of 12A. The lights on the front panel actually read 8A, 10A and 12A respectively. My previous car, the 2018 PHEV, came with an almost identical charger with the same options, but reading L, M and H on the panel for Low, Medium, and High.
 

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I have the Type B that came with my 2018 EV, it too is pretty slow for the 28kWh battery something like 14-15 hours. Never gets hot though.
 

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I assume by making the UK granny charger only 10A, the theory is that this shouldn't be a problem on most household wiring. Although plug sockets are 13amp rating, and should comfortably handle it, over long periods they will get warm.
Also a little known fact is that double sockets aren't actually generally designed to handle 2x13Amp over any sort of long period. I could envision scenarios where a household with 2 EVs might plug 2 X 13amp car chargers into a double socket, which would be a real fire risk. By sticking to 10A, this risk is mitigated somewhat.
I have 3 32amp ring mains in my house, which do seem somewhat random (ie some sockets even in the same room are on different rings), but I'm comfortable that even with the car charger plugged in to a single socket, there won't be anything getting close to 22Amp anywhere else.
Though this thread has just made me double check whether the dishwasher, washing machine and 3kw kettle are on the same circuits! Though it would be a fairly unlikely scenario that they are all drawing full load at the same time as I am making a cup of tea!
I do occasionally charge from the garage (if I need a long overnight charge and don't want to leave downstairs window open) which is only on a 16A circuit though I have to be aware that the immersion heater is on that circuit too (though immersion is hardly ever used).
Also, I always use an RCD device with the granny charger as my CU doesn't have one.
 
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