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2019 Ioniq Blue HEV Plugin
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Discussion Starter #1
/hi all! Just got our Ioniq a few weeks ago and still figuring things out. I read quiet a few posts about this but am still confused. When I picked up the car from the dealer it showed range of over 600 miles. After around 320 miles im still on the first tank and its showing 42 miles left so the range went from over 600 to around 362 and its still dropping. On top of that I fully charged the car twice giving even more mileage. The avg showing on the display is 32mpg. the temp here is around 25-40 faranheit. my commute is a couple of miles a day and not aggresive. no hills. display shows 85% economical driving. i have the heat on some times i used sports mode maybe twice for a few minutes and i used remote start a couple of times. what gives?
 

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Having the heating on and using Sport will lower the economy temperature around freezing will also not help ,but 36 mpg ( US ? ) seems a little low . From experience the mpg for the first 1000 to 1500 miles is low ( I think I was getting 55 mpg K ) , but starts to climb steadily after that period . I'm picking up a new Ioniq hybrid on Wednesday so maybe I can compare my current mpg stats to the new one . As always though consult your dealer if you're concerned
 

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Having the heating on and using Sport will lower the economy temperature around freezing will also not help ,but 36 mpg ( US ? ) seems a little low . From experience the mpg for the first 1000 to 1500 miles is low ( I think I was getting 55 mpg K ) , but starts to climb steadily after that period . I'm picking up a new Ioniq hybrid on Wednesday so maybe I can compare my current mpg stats to the new one . As always though consult your dealer if you're concerned
Congrats on your new Ioniq. As chunga68 stated - heating, cold temps and sport mode will definitely hurt your mpg's. Using heating requires engine mode, colder temps require motor to run until engine warms up and sport mode will not allow electric motor to engage. Can't say for remote start but I can say that letting it idle to warm up will drastically reduce your mpg. Kids prestart it to warm it up (sits outside when they use it) and it drops our mpg from 50's (we have heated garage so no warm-up idling) to low/mid 40's. That being said - I'm not seeing how all that brings it down to your low mpg's unless you are letting it idle to warm up for 20-30 minutes. I would definitely take it into dealer and have the low mpg documented and see what they say. Keep us updated.
 

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2019 Ioniq Blue HEV Plugin
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the info. The car only stays on for 10 minutes on remote start and it’s idling so can’t imagine using up to much gas. I’m going to refill the tank soon and won’t use the remote start or sport and will see what happens. On another note. If I charge the car fully should I then drive it on ev until the battery is depleted? I drive mostly city miles with lots of stop and go
 

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Leaving the engine running for 10 minutes accounts for approximately a 10th of a litre of fuel on average , so that shouldn't account for your poor mpg . Haven't tested it because it's illegal to leave your engine running in the UK so I don't do it .
Not driving a plug in myself but I wouldn't drive a PHEV until the battery is depleted unless you can charge at your destination .
 

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Not driving a plug in myself but I wouldn't drive a PHEV until the battery is depleted unless you can charge at your destination.
Driving the PHEV until the battery is completely depleted is more or less impossible. My experience is that the car will automatically switch over to hybrid mode when there's 16-17% of charge left. After that, you can still use some more of the remaining charge by going very slow. But I guess it will never go lower than 7-8% before the ICE will take over.

That's assuming your gas tank is not empty as well...
 

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Don't know first hand about mileage results using sport...we don't use that. But definitely having the heat on for short trips in Hybrid mode and using sport mode will reduce your mileage rates. Obviously, if you need the heat on or need to defog the windshield you've got to do what you need to do. We're very conservative on turning on the heat...to get better gas mileage.

We put on the seat heaters and steering wheel heater...it really makes a big difference to how cold/warm you feel...and if the windshield doesn't need defogging, we don't turn on the cabin heat in lieu of seats/steering heat. In cold weather for longer commutes, we don't preheat (but I cleared half the garage to park it in the non-heated garage, which makes a HUGE difference) and when we head off we put it in Hybrid or Auto, with the defrost/cabin heat on (20C, driver only)...then when the windshield is clear we put it to Auto. If during the drive the windshield needs defogging, the front defrost will be put back on. My wife's commute is 110KM each way...and she's averaging 2.9-3.1L/100KM and around 1100KM / fill up. She leaves with the battery full charged, and is able to charge at work for the drive home.

On short trips (weekend grocery runs/etc...) we do the same, but put it in Auto (which seems to use the battery wherever possible) and try not to pre-heat/warm the car. Last weekend (sunny and mild temps of 3-5 C) all the weekend short trips were EV only (seat/steering wheel heaters only). Our short trips are 5KM-15KM. The last accumulated stats (reset at the last fill up) was just over 1200KM @ 3.0L/100KM...and we didn't drain the tank completely empty.

If she can't charge for either leg of the commute (forgot to plug it in, plug wasn't available), and the weather is cold/snowy (heater on more) and she does her commute (220km there and back) in Hybrid she runs about 4.7L/100KM for the commute. It's 90% highway driving...so generally that should be the worst case scenario for us.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Right. I meant driving on battery until it switches to hev mode. Or is it more economical to leave it in hev mode and this way it’s using both battery and gas all the time. Also wondering when people are getting the 55+mpg is that with a full battery charge or is it not related. I think the computer takes into account the electric driving when calculating the mpg?
 

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Auto mode, however it figures out to use EV or ICE or EV&ICE, it really good. It takes the figuring out work out of it. Auto will use the battery if it's available and appropriate for the situation. Hybrid works as a "charge maintaining" system...so it will run the ICE to preserve battery. So if your battery is full, and you're driving ~40km, then driving in EV mode or auto mode will result in better mileage vs. Hybrid mode. For example, if I was going to drive 30km and the battery was full and I drove it in Hybrid...I would use gas @ 4.x L/100km and arrive at my destination with a full battery. If I left in EV mode, and didn't drive hard or have the heat on, I'd arrive at my destination with some battery left and 0L/100KM used in gas. If I left in Auto...it'd be somewhere in-between (better than Hybrid) and the car would try to use EV as much as it could for the driving conditions/speed/etc...

We found it to be just about as good to leave it in Auto...but you can get a bit better going EV and then letting it switch to Auto when the battery is out. For example...if we're at speed and we know that there's a long flat stretch ahead then putting it into EV (no heater/etc) will ensure it's using no ICE. Or if we have 30km to go to the destination and we have 30km of EV range, then putting it to EV will ensure that no ICE is used. But leaving it in Auto is really good...comparing number between trying to figure it out ourselves vs letting the car do it (0.1L/100KM difference). In Auto, if the battery recoups enough it will go to EV again, maybe not for long but if you're trying to eek out everything you can then I think that's the way to go.

Definitely...having a full charge for each trip is absolutely essential to getting the best mileage possible. We charge overnight...get ~40KM of the 110KM commute "for free". Charge at work...get ~40Km of the 110km trip home for free. That's 36% of the commute for free. If for the commuting portion where we don't have battery and it's running in hybrid mode (est 140km of the 220km) we're running say 4.1L/100KM.....then the averaged out L/100KM for the whole 220KM trip is ~2.6L/100KM (~90mpg). In practice we're averaging 2.9-3.0L/100km...being sparing with the heat/defogging and driving "eco"/conservative.

Driving in a "hypermiling" style definitely helps...go a little slower, follow further back so you can coast more vs. brake, don't gun it uphill, pick up speed downhill, feather the pedal to keep things even vs. accelerating/decelerating (Active Cruise Control really helps with that), follow a big trailer truck if there's a headwind, etc...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the tips. My model doesn’t have auto only ev or hev. I’m assuming the European version is different as I don’t see the possibility of getting near the 90mpg in hev mode. I would be happy to be in the 50’s
 

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Leaving the engine running for 10 minutes accounts for approximately a 10th of a litre of fuel on average , so that shouldn't account for your poor mpg . Haven't tested it because it's illegal to leave your engine running in the UK so I don't do it .
Not driving a plug in myself but I wouldn't drive a PHEV until the battery is depleted unless you can charge at your destination .
I think you will find that 10 minutes of warm-up will have bigger effect on your overall fuel mileage than you think. For the 10 minutes that you are idling, you are getting 0 mpg. Besides idling is the slowest and most wasteful way to warm up the engine. See this: Remote Starters – Roth Automotive Science
 

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So I just filled up the tank with exactly 11 gallons and now will be able to see what acutual mileage I’m getting. I won’t use the remote start and try to hardly use the heat. I drove around today around 4 miles at an average of 4mph and noticed on the display that if the vehicle was in ev mode the blue bar showing the mpg would go to the end showing 75. If I would give it any drop extra gas even if the bars on the left would be only 1 or 2 bars the engine would come on the the mpg blue bar would drop to between 0-25. Is this normal? I was able to get the car to 50mpg but that was with the engine hardly coming on. I don’t see how I can do that in a regular commute. I find it quiet hard to drive around with out the engine kicking in. Once the traffic light turns green any slight acceleration to keep the people behind me from honking turns the engine on. Thanks for any input
 

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I think you will find that 10 minutes of warm-up will have bigger effect on your overall fuel mileage than you think. For the 10 minutes that you are idling, you are getting 0 mpg. Besides idling is the slowest and most wasteful way to warm up the engine. See this: Remote Starters – Roth Automotive Science
The only time I sit in the car when it's idling in the morning is when I need to defrost the windshield . Otherwise I drive as normal .
 

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So I just filled up the tank with exactly 11 gallons and now will be able to see what acutual mileage I’m getting. I won’t use the remote start and try to hardly use the heat. I drove around today around 4 miles at an average of 4mph and noticed on the display that if the vehicle was in ev mode the blue bar showing the mpg would go to the end showing 75. If I would give it any drop extra gas even if the bars on the left would be only 1 or 2 bars the engine would come on the the mpg blue bar would drop to between 0-25. Is this normal? I was able to get the car to 50mpg but that was with the engine hardly coming on. I don’t see how I can do that in a regular commute. I find it quiet hard to drive around with out the engine kicking in. Once the traffic light turns green any slight acceleration to keep the people behind me from honking turns the engine on. Thanks for any input
what you are seeing is that the instantaneous fuel mileage goes to infinity (the end that says 75) when you are running on battery power. Infinity because the trip computer is dividing by zero fuel flow. Any time the engine restarts, of course the fuel mileage becomes realistic. All of this is normal for the instantaneous gas mileage readout
 

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So I just filled up the tank with exactly 11 gallons and now will be able to see what acutual mileage I’m getting. I won’t use the remote start and try to hardly use the heat. I drove around today around 4 miles at an average of 4mph and noticed on the display that if the vehicle was in ev mode the blue bar showing the mpg would go to the end showing 75. If I would give it any drop extra gas even if the bars on the left would be only 1 or 2 bars the engine would come on the the mpg blue bar would drop to between 0-25. Is this normal? I was able to get the car to 50mpg but that was with the engine hardly coming on. I don’t see how I can do that in a regular commute. I find it quiet hard to drive around with out the engine kicking in. Once the traffic light turns green any slight acceleration to keep the people behind me from honking turns the engine on. Thanks for any input
The picture in your post shows the state of charge in your Ioniq to be very low, only two white bars. This is well below the point when the phev would switch from ev mode into hev mode. This may be a stupid question, but have you plugged in and fully charged your phev battery?

When I drive my phev Ioniq I have no problem driving in ev mode and staying in ev mode. I just drive normally, with normal acceleration and the car rarely engages the gas engine. (Note- I do most of my driving on side roads, not highways). So your comment above got me wondering if there is a lot of variation in the phev Ioniqs. Are they consistent in the point where they switch to hev mode? Or is it simply that yours was not fully charged?
 

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I think you will find that 10 minutes of warm-up will have bigger effect on your overall fuel mileage than you think. For the 10 minutes that you are idling, you are getting 0 mpg. Besides idling is the slowest and most wasteful way to warm up the engine. See this: Remote Starters – Roth Automotive Science
I found the Just warming mine when its cold drops me about 2-5 mpg right off the bat. Then it will slowly climb as I drive. So if you warm it up and then do a few miles in sport mode, you will probably be showing 20mpg or even less. The lowest it read for me is 11mpg but it slowly climbed. Also do a real time check of the MPG. I found that what the car says vs. what it actually gets is pretty close, but you never know in your situation. Could be a bad sensor?
FYI - I found it takes longer to gain MPG then to loose it.
 

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So I just filled up the tank with exactly 11 gallons and now will be able to see what acutual mileage I’m getting. I won’t use the remote start and try to hardly use the heat. I drove around today around 4 miles at an average of 4mph and noticed on the display that if the vehicle was in ev mode the blue bar showing the mpg would go to the end showing 75. If I would give it any drop extra gas even if the bars on the left would be only 1 or 2 bars the engine would come on the the mpg blue bar would drop to between 0-25. Is this normal? I was able to get the car to 50mpg but that was with the engine hardly coming on. I don’t see how I can do that in a regular commute. I find it quiet hard to drive around with out the engine kicking in. Once the traffic light turns green any slight acceleration to keep the people behind me from honking turns the engine on. Thanks for any input
I always try and test on a full tank. That way when I drive a 100 miles or so, I just fill it again and calculate gallons to miles. Reset and repeat. Easiest way to make sure your getting an accurate reading. The pump will normally auto-stop/shut off at the exact same spot on every fill up.

Also, do not underestimate what driving habits can do. A hard acceleration may get people off your butt, but it takes fuel and a lot more electricity. Being my third hybrid, I can accurately say that most fuel consumption happens on acceleration. I dont care and sport mode it at lights. Its fun to watch our PHEV take off faster than everyone.
 

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The pump will normally auto-stop/shut off at the exact same spot on every fill up.
I've never experienced that, and, sorry, cannot believe it. Every pump has different sensitivity, and any deviation from the car's previous position makes a huge difference as well - only magnified by small fills of only 100 miles. The car's angle can create an air bubble in the tank that even if you top off (as I do), you may not have repeatable results. I do try hard to maximize the car angle away from the pump and nose down to get repeatable results, but that is not always possible.
 

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I've never experienced that, and, sorry, cannot believe it. Every pump has different sensitivity, and any deviation from the car's previous position makes a huge difference as well - only magnified by small fills of only 100 miles. The car's angle can create an air bubble in the tank that even if you top off (as I do), you may not have repeatable results. I do try hard to maximize the car angle away from the pump and nose down to get repeatable results, but that is not always possible.
Obviously use the same pump. Didnt think I had to do a step-by-step. Then again, I thought common sense would prevail, I thought wrong.

And I think people (besides yourself) understand where I was going with this. Been the same way for years, simple algebra. It was a suggestion and an idea. Obviously this may not be F1 or Nascars way to calculate gas mileage, but its quick and easy and only uses simple math (for people other than yourself of course).
 
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