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If you are talking about the hybrid that may be true, but the EV gets about 125 miles per charge. At 40A / 240v it takes 4 hours from almost empty (10 %) and 24 hours with 20A / 120V. At least that is my experience so far. I've had mine for about a month now and I LOVE it. It is whole different driving experience.
If you are talking about the hybrid that may be true, but the EV gets about 125 miles per charge. At 40A / 240v it takes 4 hours from almost empty (10 %) and 24 hours with 20A / 120V. At least that is my experience so far. I've had mine for about a month now and I LOVE it. It is whole different driving experience.
This discussion is about the plug-in hybrid. The 29 miles all-electric the poster is asking about is how far you can drive on the battery before the gasoline engine kicks in.
 

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2019 Ioniq EV (Electric Blue)
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Danny: here's the deal. The 2019 PHEV has about 29 miles of range. Depends on your driving profile. If you are driving 29-30 miles per day, most of the time, you can drive all month without using much gas. I charge at home on a 120V plug. I don't mind waiting 6-7 hours for a recharge. I don't feel a 220V solution is that necessary on a 9kwh battery. Depends on the expectations I guess. My driving delivers over 100MPG so it is worthwhile for me. By the way, many PHEV's have this kind of range, although for 2020 it is moving up a bit as the technology evolves.
This discussion is about the plug-in hybrid. The 29 miles all-electric the poster is asking about is how far you can drive on the battery before the gasoline engine kicks in.
This discussion is about the plug-in hybrid. The 29 miles all-electric the poster is asking about is how far you can drive on the battery before the gasoline engine kicks in.
Yeah, I realized that the second I posted it and I didn't know how to pull it back. Sorry.
 

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2019 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in
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the current lockdown issues, I haven't done the long journey for a while, and it's been a pure EV for the last 3 months, all charged for free from my solar panels.
Our 2019 PHEV is only 2 1/2 months old and we've hardly driven it, so our experience is thus far identical to @Georgezippybungle's. Our primary motivation was not saving money, it was cleaner local driving - more on that below.

I almost bought a used Prius plugin in 2017 but just don't like the feel of a Prius on the road; it had a 11 mile range, IIRC. I would guess that for anyone with a PHEV tax credit of any sort, the added cost of the PHEV Ioniq (compared to a HEV) is offset by the credit.

The advertised 29 mile range (closer to 40 especially in nicer weather) is pretty good for those of us who don't live in big cities with long commutes -- our typical drive in town is 2-7 miles one way. If you think about it, internal combustion engines hate short drives and don't burn gasoline as cleanly when started cold (MPG is lower too on really short drives). It feels great to thus far drive purely on electricity, most of which has been produced by our own solar panels-- near 100% clean local driving.

Anyway, that's my perspective on this.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Thanks for your great answers folks. Very helpful.

I do want to clarify one question though about the charging system: if I pull into my driveway at night and have let's say the equivalent of 5 miles electric left, and then I run into the house and fail to charge it overnight...and then the next morning I go out for a long drive, obviously I am going to use gas...will the car recharge itself during that drive? I think the answer is yes based on some of the answers above, but I want to be sure. For my driving, I would be doing perhaps 100 miles a day so I would prefer to just let the car do the charging for me rather than doing an overnight plug-in.

Thanks in advance and really do appreciate the kind support you all have given me. I will be looking at a 2019 a bit later today hopefully.
 

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Iconiq plug in. 2019
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Why would you? The advantages of the plug in Is to give you a 30 + mile range using domestic electric without the ICE being used,
In answer to your question yes it will in sport mode but by using more fuel so not really economic,
You may be better off with HEV, I use my PHEV mostly for 40 miles round trips with charging at both ends so use very little fuel unless it’s my much longer twice a year trip of 300 miles,
Then I don’t worry about charging points but still would use one if available,
 

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The only way to get a significant amount of recharge is to use Sport mode or go down a long steep hill :). IN the Uk at least energy pricing makes it a more expensive use of energy. Try and use the electric for urban driving and the ice if required for main routes and you wont go far wrong.
 
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Why would you? The advantages of the plug in Is to give you a 30 + mile range using domestic electric without the ICE being used,
In answer to your question yes it will in sport mode but by using more fuel so not really economic,
I concur. It makes no sense to buy a PHEV and then not charge the battery. Just make it part of your daily routine.

You may be better off with HEV, I use my PHEV mostly for 40 miles round trips with charging at both ends so use very little fuel unless it’s my much longer twice a year trip of 300 miles,
Then I don’t worry about charging points but still would use one if available,
Even for a 100 mile round trip, I would argue that the PHEV is still a better choice than the HEV especially assuming there's a tax credit in play. In the US, for e.g. the cost ends up being almost the same as that of an HEV. Assuming you charge at home overnight, you will likely use 1.3 gallon of gasoline instead of 1.67 gallon (assuming 60mpg on the HEV; and ~35 electric miles including "regen electric miles" and 52mpg on the PHEV). That's roughly 2 gallons a week or ~100 gallons a year of fossil fuel not used.
 

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2019 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in
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The only way to get a significant amount of recharge is to use Sport mode or go down a long steep hill :). IN the Uk at least energy pricing makes it a more expensive use of energy. Try and use the electric for urban driving and the ice if required for main routes and you wont go far wrong.
This is a somewhat tangential comment. I've only done 1 proper/long'ish trip (~150 miles roundtrip) on HEV mode so far. One thing I did, and plan to continue doing, is to switch to EV mode any time I got stopped by traffic or on a traffic light on a state highway until I got to around 40mph. My reasoning is that the ICE is less efficient at low speeds but the motor does not care if you're starting from 0 or 40 miles.
 

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if I pull into my driveway at night and have let's say the equivalent of 5 miles electric left, and then I run into the house and fail to charge it overnight...and then the next morning I go out for a long drive, obviously I am going to use gas...will the car recharge itself during that drive?
No, in normal operation once the electric range is gone it's gone. The car will operate as a hybrid with the battery level going up and down in the bottom 25% of its capacity but never gaining back any EV range (unless you go down a really long hill). You can switch to Sports mode and it will climb higher and start giving you EV range back, but you'll be burning more gas that way and defeating the purpose of owning a plug-in hybrid.

Plug-in is right there in the name. (Well, except here in Canada where Hyundai stupidly calls it the "electric plus", lol.)
 

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Discussion Starter #30
So I have an offer for a 2019 Ioniq PHEV Limited with the Ultimate package - MSRP is 33500, deal is 22600. What do you folks think?
 

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Sounds like a great deal to me! That's loads less than I paid for mine, and personally I much prefer the 2019 interior over the 2020. Only you can know if it's the right car for you though, can you get a test drive in it?
 
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