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Perhaps I don't have this right...is it correct that the 2019 range is only about 29 miles all electric? 2+ hours charging time at 220v for 29 miles? I was very surprised to read that the range is so low so I really hope someone can tell my why I am wrong. 2+ hours to save effectively 1/2 gallon of gas makes no sense to me.

What am I missing?
 

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Sometime it depends on your personal situation. If you live less than 30 miles from work and you can plug in at work and gas costs $4.00 a gallon you will save $5.00 per day, and get great parking and clean air.
 

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Thanks.

Well I do understand that...and holding aside the fact that gas is currently about $2 (and can and will eventually go up)...it is still hard to grasp making the argument that clean air is a benefit when the reality is that the car is supposed to give you 52 mpg and for virtually all trips over 29 miles (absent the away from home charging station) you're polluting the air marginally anyway.

Very disappointed to see that the range is only 29. Why is it not far greater?
 

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Perhaps I don't have this right...is it correct that the 2019 range is only about 29 miles all electric? 2+ hours charging time at 220v for 29 miles? I was very surprised to read that the range is so low so I really hope someone can tell my why I am wrong. 2+ hours to save effectively 1/2 gallon of gas makes no sense to me.

What am I missing?
I have a 2020 PHEV ... I get about 40km on the highway ... and close to 50km in town in EV mode only. For me, I can drive back and forth to work using EV mode ONLY... I drove 4500km and had a gas mileage reading of 0.3L/100km ... that's 750 mpg. When I drive it in Hybrid mode I seem to average about 2.2L / 100km. It takes about 7hrs to charge it overnight using the 120V trickle charger it comes with.. at work, using the 220V system it takes about 2 hours to charge it up... on days when I've really depleted it I've seen it take 3 hours. That is typical for all electric cars unless they have the ability to use a 'fast charger'... the Ioniq does NOT come with that.
 

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It's true that other plug-ins like the Chevy Volt and Honda Clarity go farther all-electric, but they also use more gas when they're burning gas, and the Clarity's fuel tank is tiny so you'll be stopping a lot to fill it when you do take a long trip. For me the Ioniq plug-in was the perfect blend of compromises.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks all.

I have seen some conflicting info in various articles and youtube videos on the Ioniq. With the PHEV model, does the battery get recharged as you drive it in hybrid mode? If so, then I am less concerned about the 29 range.
 

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The short answer is that the battery maintains charge, just like a hybrid so yes, the engine charges the battery when needed (like all hybrids). In fact, a PHEV is simply a hybrid with a larger battery, one you can plug in. A hybrid benefits from a battery in several ways, it can recover energy from most slowing events, and down hills. It also allows for use of a more efficient (but slow) engine, adding additional torque when needed for acceleration or climbing hills.

But if you cannot benefit from plug in miles, getting a straight hybrid is typically about 300 pounds lighter resulting in a better EPA rating. Pretty easy to get 600 to 700 miles on a tank. My best tank in the far less aero sister car Niro was 784 miles.
 

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In hybrid (HEV) mode it tries its best to charge sustain, keeping the battery at whatever level it was at when you entered HEV. In Sport mode the battery will recharge, but you'll burn noticeably more gas doing it and in most areas it's cheaper to just plug in and recharge rather than using Sport.

The car always starts in EV mode, but the engine will kick in if:

a) You step on it, where it will come on briefly as needed.
b) It needs to make heat on a cold day, although in that case only at high idle and still disconnected from the wheels, unless its stupid cold out and it goes full HEV to heat up faster.
c) The battery drops below 25% in which case it automatically switches to HEV and the charge level bounces around between 10 to 25 % as it optimizes for best economy.
d) You manually switch to HEV or Sport mode. Even then, the engine may turn off if you coast or are going downhill.

If I know that my round trip is within electric range I'll keep the car in the default EV mode, if not I manually switch to HEV for highways and save EV for in town because the car is much smoother and quieter in stop-and-go traffic in pure EV. I think it's more pleasurable to drive that way, plus you get more electric range at lower speeds. At highway speeds the gas engine is unnoticeable as it kicks in and out, but having it row through the gears at low speeds I find it annoying and do my best to do all city driving in EV.

I almost never use Sport mode, stepping on it enough to engage the gas engine works for all the highway merges in my area. If the highway's not busy I can usually nurse it enough to keep it in EV, but that's damned near impossible at rush hour. It's only the rare crazy short merge ramp (like some on the Gardiner expressway in Toronto) or pulling out onto a busy road where I use Sport mode, which remaps the gas peddle for snappier response plus uses the full torque of both the gas and electric motors pulling together. It took me by surprise the first time I used it to pull out onto a busy road, I almost rear ended the car that I pulled out behind! I've learned it now and that doesn't happen anymore...
 

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Very disappointed to see that the range is only 29. Why is it not far greater?
Actually, 29 miles is not so bad compared to most other PHEVs on the market. It clocks in as number six on the list of PHEVs with the longest EV range. You might even say that it's number five if you disqualify the BMW i3 REx which is basically not a PHEV at all, but a fully electric car with a tiny two cylinder gas engine as an emergency backup. (The Chevy Volt is no longer in production.)

Plug-In Hybrid Car Range, Price & More Compared For U.S.

I drove an Ioniq plug-in for a year and a half before switching to my current fully electric Ioniq. Even with the typical 29 mile (47 km) EV range I can say that the saving on petrol was substantial. My old Honda Jazz ("Fit") typically required filling up the tank twice every month. With my Ioniq PHEV and regular home charging it took five months before I had to go to the gas station.
 

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2019 user here. I can only charge at office @ aporx 21 cents per KWH (Its .75 cents an hour to charge) My comute is 6 miles + going out to lunch.. means i can bbasically run pure electric m-f and varies on weekend. I did some test weeks on gas only and my nampin math tellss me .21 cent charging = $2.80 gas Being in so cal tthat's genenraly a heck of a deal pre-covid and is break even-ish is now.
 

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I have a 2019 PHEV. I get 35+ miles no problem in EV mode unless it's really cold or I'm in a hurry. As for charging time, it doesn't matter how long it takes if you can charge at home, just plug it in until you next leave. My daily commute is 25 miles total, that's why I chose the car, do it all on EV, I do however have requirement for regular longer journeys beyond the range of the pure EV version which is why I didn't get that.
With the current lockdown issues, I haven't done the long journey for a while, and it's been a pure EV for the last 3 months, all charged for free from my solar panels.
 

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With the current lockdown issues, I haven't done the long journey for a while, and it's been a pure EV for the last 3 months, all charged for free from my solar panels.
Pretty much my experience. Most journeys are EV but nice to not have to worry about charging for longer trips and holidays. Pretty much the best of both worlds.
 

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As for charging time, it doesn't matter how long it takes if you can charge at home, just plug it in until you next leave.
Yes and no, on a weekend where I run several errands making stops all over town I come up short unless I take a huge break in the middle of the day to recharge or resign myself to burning gas. I'd much rather that break take one hour while I'm having lunch at a mall or something than the current two and a bit hours making work at home. I'm jealous of the 7.5 kW charger in the top trim Chevy Volt, but of course that cost a lot more than the Ioniq which is one of the reasons I didn't get it. Then of course there's the DC fast charging in the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV, which is a whole n'other level of want.
 

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Thanks.

Well I do understand that...and holding aside the fact that gas is currently about $2 (and can and will eventually go up)...it is still hard to grasp making the argument that clean air is a benefit when the reality is that the car is supposed to give you 52 mpg and for virtually all trips over 29 miles (absent the away from home charging station) you're polluting the air marginally anyway.

Very disappointed to see that the range is only 29. Why is it not far greater?
I think that the 8.9 kWh battery strikes the right balance of size and weight. The full-electric Ioniq for 2019 was 124 mi and for 2020 it is 170 which is kind of low compared to other manufacturers who are getting in the mid 200's. The range of the 2019 plugin with a full tank of gas and a full charge of 29 miles is 630 miles which is far greater than many gas-only cars. For everyday travel, I find that the only time I use gasoline is if I do a hard acceleration or put the car into sport mode (helps warm the cabin quicker in cold weather). I can go months between fillups at the gas station.
 

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2019 Ioniq Plugin, Phantom black
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Perhaps I don't have this right...is it correct that the 2019 range is only about 29 miles all electric? 2+ hours charging time at 220v for 29 miles? I was very surprised to read that the range is so low so I really hope someone can tell my why I am wrong. 2+ hours to save effectively 1/2 gallon of gas makes no sense to me.

What am I missing?
Danny: here's the deal. The 2019 PHEV has about 29 miles of range. Depends on your driving profile. If you are driving 29-30 miles per day, most of the time, you can drive all month without using much gas. I charge at home on a 120V plug. I don't mind waiting 6-7 hours for a recharge. I don't feel a 220V solution is that necessary on a 9kwh battery. Depends on the expectations I guess. My driving delivers over 100MPG so it is worthwhile for me. By the way, many PHEV's have this kind of range, although for 2020 it is moving up a bit as the technology evolves.
 

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2019 Ioniq EV (Electric Blue)
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Perhaps I don't have this right...is it correct that the 2019 range is only about 29 miles all electric? 2+ hours charging time at 220v for 29 miles? I was very surprised to read that the range is so low so I really hope someone can tell my why I am wrong. 2+ hours to save effectively 1/2 gallon of gas makes no sense to me.

What am I missing?
If you are talking about the hybrid that may be true, but the EV gets about 125 miles per charge. At 40A / 240v it takes 4 hours from almost empty (10 %) and 24 hours with 20A / 120V. At least that is my experience so far. I've had mine for about a month now and I LOVE it. It is whole different driving experience.
 
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