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Hi Ioniq Drivers,

First of all I just wanted to say that this car looks amazing compared to the Prius Prime and Nissan Leaf.

I currently drive a 2007 Honda Civic Hybrid in the bay area. I live 40 miles from work, so I drive 80 miles a day about 20,000 miles a year +. The three biggest issues I don't want to repeat is the MPG, battery replacement, and the road noise. It was said that I would get 50+ MPG, I currently get 37 MPG, I already had the main battery replaced 5 years later, and the road noise is so bad for blue tooth headsets.

I am currently waiting to test drive a Ioniq Hybrid next week 2/27/17. They have a bunch of cars on order in the Bay Area, which means I will have to wait even longer for the car and color I want. (June-July Time Frame).

From what I read on the forums, that I should see 55 MPG around town and 70 MPG on drives to work with not much traffic.

Turning up the radio to drown out road noise is not an option when on a call.

They have a lifetime warranty on the battery for the original owner, that is a big win over other competitors.

It sounds like the acceleration is not great, but it is not a sports car nor would I ever speed up to avoid a collision.

Should I order the Limited Ultra with 15" wheels instead of the 17" wheels to gain a 13 MPG increase in fuel efficiency?

Also, I have no idea on the price as the dealer was not informed yet. I expect this car to be under 30K as compared to a fully loaded Prius Prime Hybrid.

I did contemplate the EV and EV Plugin versions, but the limited range (under 110 Miles) and delivery dates (Late 2017) are not worth waiting for.

I look forward to your responses,

Ronin
 

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Absolutely avoid the larger wheels. Higher noise, lower efficiency, and more costly tire replacement. That said, getting the smaller wheels is not a factory option on the Ultra - you will have to negotiate with the dealer. You are paying for a wheel "upgrade" to 17 with the Ultra, and are unlikely to recover the cost. Can you start at a lower lever and still get the options you want?

The battery warranty is good as far as it goes, but it doesn't cover normal battery degradation, a primary reason for replacing the battery 5 plus years later. 5 years isn't exactly normal for battery replacement, I think you had some cell failures which would be covered by Hyundai. But to ease your mind, it is almost impossible to vary the charge in the Ioniq (or Niro) outside of a 25% to 75% level. That is a recipe for very long battery life.
 
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Welcome Ronin


I get no complaints of noise when on the phone in the car, although there is a fair bit of road noise on some concrete motorways / highways here in the UK


rough estimates
at 60 mph on cruise I see about 66mpg (UK) / 55mpg (US)
at 65-70 mph on cruise I see about 60mpg (UK) / 50mpg(US)


round town I see low / mid 50's mpg (UK) mid / high 40's mpg (US)


you need to do about 10 minutes driving to see a good mpg round town to allow time for the ICE to warm up and cut out


we don't have enough data about the mpg difference between the 15" / 17" wheels to know the real world impact on mpg yet


I find the acceleration more than adequate and when joining a motorway / highway either stick it in sport mode so it holds gears longer for better acceleration or try not ease off the gas too much so it don't go up the gears so fast
 

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The battery warranty is good as far as it goes, but it doesn't cover normal battery degradation, a primary reason for replacing the battery 5 plus years later. 5 years isn't exactly normal for battery replacement, I think you had some cell failures which would be covered by Hyundai. But to ease your mind, it is almost impossible to vary the charge in the Ioniq (or Niro) outside of a 25% to 75% level. That is a recipe for very long battery life.
If I fully charge the battery at home, it will have 90%. If I want to keep it below 75% I would need to interrupt it at some time I have to calculate at forehand. Or do you know a settings option that lets the car stop charging at 75% itself?
 
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Referring to the hybrid. Here is one source:
https://arstechnica.com/cars/2017/0...ro-review-korean-tanks-parked-on-japans-lawn/

Both the Niro and Ioniq hybrids are frustrating to hypermilers accustomed to Prius based strategies with brake settings, and forced electric only operation, and some different throttle management to force EV mode. The Hyundai/Kia hybrids require different strategies that are perhaps not really equal. One of them is managing the battery charge level. To their credit, the top trim Niro/Ioniqs with navigation can do such strategies on hills, adding extra electric power on uphills and then recharging on downhills. But that is not available on the highest mileage lower trim versions, and cannot be done manually as it can be in a Prius.

Your EV model does have some manual battery preservation possibilities not possible with hybrids. Depending on your daily trip planning, you should be able to keep your battery charged in a 40 to 80% range most of the time. That should bring about the least battery degradation. I don't bother with my cellphone as a full charge is needed on many days to last a full day. But I do practice charge management with my laptop, and don't leave it plugged in, or drop too low. Optimal lithium battery management is well known (as is NiCad) and while it must be frustrating to EV owners that the full potential range of their batteries can never be used, it is to the benefit of battery longevity.
 
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