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Ah right, that may be what I'm missing. When I have used scheduled charging, I don't have it set to 'charge now', I set it to 'charge on schedule'.
 

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This is a great article on the subject. The my16-19 ioniq has good sized buffers but is also a real pain to charge to anything other than 100%. I would love the feature of the newer cars with a limiter.

I charge mine to 100% during the night before driving, during summer i might try to limit it somewhat and stop the charge at 70-80%, but its a pain.
that was my go nowhere petition
still pissed off that hyundai refuses to do anything about it. Now I use a mechanical timer with my charger. My friend that used to own an ioniq that now owns a tesla laughs at me and shakes his head. hyundai is still stuck in an ICE world and does not believe in updates
 

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2020 Ioniq EV Limited (US)
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Hi
It depends on the time after you charge how soon you use the car. I have found from different sources that if you are charging to 100% then you should not leave the battery to sit without being used for any period of time. This goes for all li-on batteries, phones, tablets, cars. So, if you charge at work to 100%, then drive home a bit of a distance away you should be fine. From the charge time you mentioned, 4-4.5 hours, it sounds like you drive a bit of a distance each day.
If however you charged to 100% then let it sit for a weekend, or a week, that is not the best way to treat the battery.

All batteries need to be charged to 100% at least every few charges as the battery management system can balance all the cells when you do so. The management system takes charge from a fully charged cell and distributes it around to cells that are slightly under charged, bringing all cells up to maximum and balancing the entire pack. If this balancing isn’t done every so often, those undercharged cells weaken the whole structure and can cause issues as the pack ages.

John
I'm a new Ioniq owner, but I have some experience with Lithium batteries of various chemistries. In general Lithium batteries are happiest when kept around 50% charge. They don't like to sit for a long time near 0% or 100%. In EV applications the reason they appear to tolerate a 0-80% cycle better than a 20-100% cycle is simply because we generally tend to recharge them relatively soon after discharging them, and often let them sit for a while after charging them. Also, we rarely actually take them to near zero to avoid getting stranded. In any event, your likely to get well over 2000 cycles without significant degradation in normal use, as long as the doesn't involve a frequent 0-100% cycle with long periods of rest before or after the cycle.
 

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Thanks for that info Worldtraveler58. Quick question for you. I hear lots of mention of cycles...in your response you mention 2000 cycles. Is a cycle defined as charging from 0-100%? The reason I ask is because, I only use granny charging for my vehicle (level 1 from a 120V household outlet). It takes forever, but there is an outlet next to my car at my parking spot at work. I get 6 hours of charge and it gives me approx 12% or so of charge. I normally use about 10% per day in my commute to and from work. So, if I charge my ride daily at work for 6 hours, and keep it around 60%-70% daily, is each charge considered a cycle? If so, then with approx 300 days a year of charging, my battery is only good for about 6 years, right? If I skip a day or two and let it drain lower, I don't charge long enough at work to get the battery full enough for the weekend. Is this type of charging bad for the battery? I see people at the mall charging their cars for several hours and doing it each time they go to the mall. If each time they plug it in to charge is that considered a cycle? Thanks in advance for any advice given.
 

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A cycle is 0 to 100%, so going from 20 to 70% twice is equivalent to one cycle, 50 to 83.3% three times is equivalent to one cycle, etc.
 
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Ioniq 38kwh 2020
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A cycle is 0 to 100%, so going from 20 to 70% twice is equivalent to one cycle, 50 to 83.3% three times is equivalent to one cycle, etc.
A cycle is 0 to 100%, so going from 20 to 70% twice is equivalent to one cycle, 50 to 83.3% three times is equivalent to one cycle, etc.
This is true in pure cycle terms, although it is reckoned that higher up the cycle is more damaging. So charging 90% - 100% is "supposed" to be like 0.8 "cycles" equivalent. Whereas say 10-20% is only 0.03 "cycles" equivalent.
Now obviously most car batteries have high "buffers" or more accurately a lower maximum voltage. So 100% may only be the equivalent to maybe 80% of full charge voltage.
I understand cars like the Ampera basically use an effective 20-60% range to maximise battery longevity, these cars are quite old now so this sort of thing must have been known about for a while.
But 20-60% is considered the sweet spot of least damage/maximum life.
In reality on a car battery with hidden buffers then 60% is probably more like real 80%, which could be the reason that even Tesla suggest only charging to 80% unless you need the extra range.
It's hard to measure though, but from personal experience with laptop batteries (similar, though older battery tech) I have one laptop which is around 6 years old and have always used the setting to restrict charge to 80%. That still shows around 85% battery capacity. I've some other laptops that don't have the facility to restrict charge, and even after 18 months one of them is already below 85% capacity as it has spent most it's short life plugged in and at 100%.
Now they are different makes of laptop/battery so it's not comparing apples with apples, but it suggests there maybe some truth in it.
 

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Ampera uses 20-85% AFAIK. Certainly makes for a very long-lasting battery.
 

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2020 Hyundai Ioniq Premium (EV)
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Correct.
But it damages the battery less than one 0 to 100% cycle. Hence you can calculate 2 20 to 70% cycles rather like 0.8-0.9 cycles.
Does it tho? Lithium-batteries don't like extremes. Like 0 % or 100 % charge. But as far as I know they aren't worn excessively unless they stay at those extremes for extended periods (like days, weeks, etc). The reason so many people has experienced battery issues with Leafs is because they have a small battery, so people tend to always have them connected to the charger so they always have max range available. Older Leafs don't have a buffer either meaning that 100 % is actually 100 %.

As I use my car more or less every day, I tend to charge once or twice a week, usually to 100 %. The car will never sit more than a few hours on 100 % charge do I don't worry about that. Then I charge it when it gets to about 30-40 %.
 

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Yes, there are a couple of scientific studies, e.g. "Aging of Lithium-Ion Batteries in Electric Vehicles" from Peter Keil or "Extending Battery Lifetime by Avoiding High SOC" by Evelina Wikner and Torbjörn Thiringer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Does it tho? Lithium-batteries don't like extremes. Like 0 % or 100 % charge. But as far as I know they aren't worn excessively unless they stay at those extremes for extended periods (like days, weeks, etc). The reason so many people has experienced battery issues with Leafs is because they have a small battery, so people tend to always have them connected to the charger so they always have max range available. Older Leafs don't have a buffer either meaning that 100 % is actually 100 %.

As I use my car more or less every day, I tend to charge once or twice a week, usually to 100 %. The car will never sit more than a few hours on 100 % charge do I don't worry about that. Then I charge it when it gets to about 30-40 %.
Kajac, I've adopted a very similar approach to charging... Mo through Fr, I drive 110 miles round trip... so I'm charging to 100% 1 or 2 times a week and only .5-4.0 hours before my drive home... I have access to 3 free charging spots within .75-1.25 miles away from my office. If I'm not charging to 100%, I'm charging to 50-70% at home... just enough to get back to work and back to the free chargers. I try to use my home charger as little as possible to save $$. On the weekends, I may only charge 1 or 2 times to that 50-70% target. It's a balancing act... but I think it's 'part of the fun' of EV ownership. It drives my wife crazy though. :ROFLMAO:
 
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