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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
full article at Hyundai Ioniq hybrid, PHEV and EV expected by early 2018

Hyundai Australia (HMCA) wants the new Ioniq range to storm our fledgling electrified vehicle market, eventually comprising a portfolio of regular petrol hybrid, plug-in hybrid (PHEV) and fully electric (EV) derivatives by early 2018.

First off the mark will be the ‘regular’ series hybrid that’ll launch in quarter-four this year, priced at about $35k, to rival the polarising new Toyota Prius and the relatively popular and more conventionally designed petrol-electric Corolla.

Rolling into the first half of 2018, Hyundai is confident the 50km electric-range PHEV and 280km electric-range EV versions will arrive here, given they’re both slated to be made available in right-hand drive within this timeframe.
 

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Australian here, (Am I the only Australian on this forum?) Long time lurker, none poster.

My thoughts on the Ioniq in Australia,
Australians prefer Utility vehicles (Utes) and SUVs, looking at the top 10 vehicles this year so far; 3 Utes, 3 Suvs, 3 Small hatches, and 1 Sedan.

1 Toyota HiLux
2 Ford Ranger
3 Toyota Corolla
4 Mazda 3
5 Mazda CX-5
6 Hyundai i30
7 Toyota Camry
8 Holden Colorado
9 Toyota Landcruiser
10 Hyundai Tucson

Australia has in place laws that protect their 3 car manufacturing companies; Toyota, Holden(GM) and Ford; all of which are also ceasing manufacturing this year in Australia due to lack of sales and cost of manufacturing. Which was because they only built sedans in Australia; the Ford Falcon and Holden Commodore and Toyota Camry sales took a massive dive in the past because of the rising cost of petrol, Toyota builds the Camry and Aurion which the government buys a lot of due to Toyota's' highly competitive leasing program.

Hyundai is the 3rd or 4th largest seller of cars in Australia fighting Holden month to month.

Australians drive on average 15,500Kms a year. With a lack of recharging infrastructure, high cost of electricity and the vast driving distance between popular destinations the EVs low range will only appeal to a small niche of people.

Our Prime Minister does not believe in Global Warming or clean energy, a country run on coal and a massive producer or coal for china it wouldn't be good business to promote or adopt the practise.

Hybrids only account for a total of 5% of vehicle sales in Australia, 90% being Toyota with their Prius C, Prius V, Prius and Camry line.

There are no incentive's to buy EVs in Australia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
welcome Riore

I think you may be the first Australian on the forum, I think we have had a member from NZ post a few times

interesting information about the Australian market, so the EV version is not likely to sell well (certainly not in the beginning) but the plugin and pure hybrid may

the pure hybrid like the Prius don't need to be plugged in at all, gets all its power from the onboard generator and regenerative braking the same as the prius

the plugin will do about 50km on electric, then runs as the pure hybrid until recharged again, so if it is viable depends on your journeys and how much 8kwh's cost in relation to about 2ltr of gas

but if you have been lurking a while you should know the information above

I would think mainly the city folk would prefer the sedan style of the Ioniq, those who travel a lot may consider the CUV style of the Kia Niro if they bring that to Australia

any thoughts?
 

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welcome Riore

I think you may be the first Australian on the forum, I think we have had a member from NZ post a few times

interesting information about the Australian market, so the EV version is not likely to sell well (certainly not in the beginning) but the plugin and pure hybrid may

the pure hybrid like the Prius don't need to be plugged in at all, gets all its power from the onboard generator and regenerative braking the same as the prius

the plugin will do about 50km on electric, then runs as the pure hybrid until recharged again, so if it is viable depends on your journeys and how much 8kwh's cost in relation to about 2ltr of gas

but if you have been lurking a while you should know the information above

I would think mainly the city folk would prefer the sedan style of the Ioniq, those who travel a lot may consider the CUV style of the Kia Niro if they bring that to Australia

any thoughts?
8KW costs $1.92 ($0.24 x 8KW)
Petrol ranges from $1.15 to $1.50 per liter depending if it's a public holiday due to price gouging.

Surprisingly one of our major electricity providers has stepped up and is advertising/marketing themselves to be a greener provider.
They are currently offering a plan for $1 a day to recharge your electric car (+additional installation cost) so for AGL Electric car plan

There has been no announcement for the Kia Niro, Kia even though they are owned by Hyundai are not very popular here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
update on dates

2017 Hyundai Ioniq PHEV: Australian launch moves to next year, plug-in now in focus

An Australian launch for the new ultra-green Hyundai Ioniq has been pushed back to sometime in 2017, after having first been pencilled in for a local debut in the third quarter of this year.
The change of plan, according to Hyundai Australia communications manager Bill Thomas, is due to a shift in the development and production schedule of the Ioniq’s three variants: petrol-electric hybrid, plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) and full battery electric vehicle (EV).
“North American and European markets prioritised full EV development over PHEV, so launch order is HEV first, then EV, then*PHEV,” Thomas told CarAdvice today.
The specific length of the delay is still to be determined, but there may be a silver lining.
Where previously Australia was scheduled to get the regular hybrid model, with the PHEV as a mere wish-list item, the company’s local arm has shifted its focus to the latter.
“In theory, launching a conventional hybrid would just make us a follower or an also ran, so early preferences are for the higher-tech PHEV – and a later launch,” Thomas said.
Part of that change of tack is due to oil price drops that have been reflected at the bowser – along with increasingly efficient petrol and diesel engines – making regular hybrid models less appealing to buyers than they have been in the past.
The shift “has made it difficult to forecast how things will shape up,” he said, “and the market seems to be trending away from simple green options”.
“While Ioniq is a brand statement and not about volume, we need to be sure that the market finds our car appealing.”
The company continues to consider its options. “It could be that PHEV in first quarter 2017, followed by EV later, is our best option, but it depends on how the market develops,” Thomas said.
He added that the third variant, an all-electric offering that will likely prove the most popular version depending on price, “isn’t ruled out at this stage”.
 

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update on dates
Sadly this article is very old 23/02/16 as the quote of Q1 2017 for the hybrid has expired.

I emailed Hyundai Australia on the 2nd April and obtained the following statement from a button presser who obviously just copied and pasted a generic response;

Hyundai Australia said:
"We are delighted to hear that you are interested in Ioniq. At this stage there are no plans to release the Ioniq in Australia however our Product Planning team are looking into bringing this model to Australia."
I still have my fingers crossed for Hybrid in Q4 2017 and the PHEV/EV for Q1 2018. As a vague mention in this recent article on the Hyundai Australia website, http://www.hyundai.com.au/hyundai-i...undai-ioniq-wins-2017-green-good-design-award but would be even more eager on the EV being released yesterday haha.

With the price of petrol crashing and electricity skyrocketing in Australia, the government favoring coal power we're not exactly being pressured or influenced to make greener lifestyle choices.
 

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Ah, Australia - fantastic people with some bad luck to a few things. Like the coal-based energy industry. Or games censorship.
And as it turns out - Ioniq release as well, which I don't understand due to geographical proximity.
I'll keep my fingers crossed you guys get your Ioniqs soon, too.
Hooroo!
 

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You wait, Aussies love digging things up. Sooner or later they'll find lithium.

Then it's all go for HEV/PHEV and EV for city use.
 

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You wait, Aussies love digging things up. Sooner or later they'll find lithium.

Then it's all go for HEV/PHEV and EV for city use.
We actually have all the resources to make our own batteries (Lithium,Cobalt,Nickel) if we processed them ourselves onshore but we like to mine stuff and ship it to somewhere else (China) and buy it back once its manufactured into a product. I think we're the second biggest Lithium miner after Chile.
 

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Hello! I'm another Australian keen for a Hyundai Ioniq EV (or Nissan LEAF or Tesla Model 3).

I read with interest that Hyundai has been talking up the Ioniq with fleet buyers and expects to have some variants of the Ioniq on the road before the end of 2017.

I don't know if that includes the EV Ioniq, but the full range is expected to be available in showrooms by mid-2018. Out of all the RHD electric cars, the Hyundai Ioniq and 2nd generation Nissan LEAF appeal to me the most, but the LEAF is another year away :(
 

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Anyone heard anything new about the Ioniq in Australia? The Hyundai dealers near me have no clue (as expected) - some don't even know what it is and told me Hyundai doesn't make any electric cars.
 

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Would an EV be practical in Australia ? Surprised if there's no Hybrid there though .
 

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Would an EV be practical in Australia ? Surprised if there's no Hybrid there though .
Why wouldn't it be? Almost half of Australia lives in big cities like Melbourne (4m pop) or Sydney (5m pop) and are like city dwellers anywhere else in the world, who don't travel that far every day.

Infrastructure is a bit lacking, but if you have a garage to charge up in, problem solved.
 

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No offence meant . I was thinking of cross country trips rather than the city . I shouldn't imagine the 172 mile range would cut it
 

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No offence meant . I was thinking of cross country trips rather than the city . I shouldn't imagine the 172 mile range would cut it
There's fast charging highway networks in Queensland and Western Australia - but if you wanted to drive from say, Melbourne to Perth (2200mi), you're outta luck, hah
 

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but if you wanted to drive from say, Melbourne to Perth (2200mi), you're outta luck, hah
That exactly what I was thinking of :)
 

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Looking up then :) , Maybe Hyundai are waiting until they can increase the range before releasing it in Australia . I was reading yesterday that the Kona with come out with a 297 mile range so maybe the Ioniq will have it's range increased ?
 
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