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I'm not questioning that it is more pleasant to drive EV at any time, just using BionixJohn's own measurements to point out that it is less efficient. I'm totally glad he agrees with me.
 

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I'm not questioning that it is more pleasant to drive EV at any time, just using BionixJohn's own measurements to point out that it is less efficient. I'm totally glad he agrees with me.
I fear you are struggling with the arithmetic. It is NOT less efficient. You go 600 miles doing it either way on your 11.4 gallons of gas. It is exactly the same . There are no measurements I gave that dispute this. So, no I do not agree with you. As I do not think you actually own an Ioniq PHEV, I cannot imagine where your arguments continue to come from.
Once again explained another way yticolev: if I drive 56 miles in 53 minutes in sport mode 5th gear at 35 mpg then follow that with 27 miles in all electric, I have travelled 83 miles and burned 1.6 gal of gas. If you drive right behind me in an identical Ioniq for the same 83 miles in hybrid mode and get 52 mpg you have travelled the same 83 miles and burned 1.596 gal of gas. The difference in cost at $2.50 per gal is exactly 1 cent. If you feel that this 1 cent cost in 83 miles supports some continued arguement on your part then go for it. Not another driver on the planet would agree with you. Also, if we run into construction, traffic tie up or accident In that 83 miles and I get to switch to electric even with only 8 or 10 miles charge built up, your 1 cent savings is shot to ****! This is not science or physics. It is the simple arithmetic of the actual results. I do it day in and day out and have for going on 3 years. What is preventing you from understanding this? I will honestly try to explain it any way possible for you to understand the numbers but so far you seem unable to grasp it. There is simply no difference in fuel consumption either way and therefore NO less efficiency. Good luck in working through the numbers and perhaps one day you can borrow someone’s Ioniq and prove it to yourself in a couple of hours of driving.
 

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While driving for these 52 minutes in charge mode you will burn .39 of 1 US gal more than if you drove in hybrid mode.
Happy to use your arithmetic. It would seem to follow fundamental physics.
 

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If you drive in automatic mode until charge is depleted, then switch to sport mode, 5th gear, and drive for 52 minutes you will be 100% recharged. The ratio is roughly 2 to 1. For every 2 miles you drive in 5thgear sport mode, you will regain 1 mile of all electric. So on a 900 mile trip you will really drive 600 miles on gas and 200 miles on electric. City driving, mountains and other use of level 3 regen will even improve on the above. While driving for these 52 minutes in charge mode you will burn .39 of 1 US gal more than if you drove in hybrid mode. At $2.15 a gallon average in the US, this .39 gallon will mean it cost you about 90 cents to recharge and you keep driving while you do it. If you stopped at a commercial level 2 charger, it will take about 2 hours and 15 minutes and cost $3 to $4 to charge. Don’t let anyone tell you that charging in sport mode while driving is inefficient. That is nonsense! Plus of course you shut your ICE engine off for 25 or 30 minutes every 52 to 55 minutes so you can drive in electric again.
Good luck and enjoy your Ioniq PHEV.
UK calculation
Driving in 5th for 52 mins will cost £1.66 using the figures above (remember US gallons are smaller than UK gallons). I’m not sure how much the Ioniq will cost to fill up at a motorway station though. Maybe someone else from the uk can chime in, and maybe someone else can check my maths!
 

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Just a quick follow up ... I rarely get more than 4.0 l/100km. Actually the absolute highest I got was 4.2 l/100km for a 420km trip doing mostly motorway with speed set to 130km/h. Of course that includes the 70 km in EV mode.
 

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Not quite sure what you are trying to illustrate here but I do note that you travelled 701.8 miles in 48hrs and 43 min and averaged 83 mpg. Impressive! What were you doing? Driving around in your local grocery store parking lot for 2 days??
LOL. Just Kidding but I am not sure what you are trying to say that relates to the point about driving about 52 minutes in 5th gear at 60 mph to fully recharge the PHEV battery pack before switching back to electric mode.
 

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Hi guys,

What is the estimate km when the tank is full? Not including the EV range.
1000 km excluding electric (Plug in Capability)
1500 km approx (me) plugging in 3-4 times a week
 
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There have been people in the hybrid threads that have gotten 700-800 miles on a tank in relatively ideal conditions going i think 40-55mph, which is 60+ mpg, so i think if you're willing to cruise at 60mph or lower, the hybrid mode might get significantly better than 52mpg.
 

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There have been people in the hybrid threads that have gotten 700-800 miles on a tank in relatively ideal conditions going i think 40-55mph, which is 60+ mpg, so i think if you're willing to cruise at 60mph or lower, the hybrid mode might get significantly better than 52mpg.
Wang would be correct here but if you want to drive at 55 mph or less, you will also get nearly 40 mpg in charge mode while recharging battery pack on the go in just 52 minutes. This way will give you about the same number of total miles but let’s you drive in electric mode for a full 33% of your miles and you get to pick where you use there 33% electric miles. As I have stated before, the numbers get significantly better if you can take advantage of your adjustable regen paddle setting in mountains, hills or city driving.
A prime example is to start at the Donner Pass summit rest area heading west to Sacramento and depart in electric mode and level 3 regen. You will drive the 94 miles to Sacramento all on electric and you will be pretty well fully charged when you get to the outskirts. Of course, you were at 7200 feet above sea level at the Donner Pass rest area and as you cross the SacramentoRiver bridge the elevation is 30 feet above sea level. The reverse works from Donner Pass going eastbound into Reno but that distance is only about 40 miles to downtown Reno and produces different results.
 

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Not quite sure what you are trying to illustrate here but I do note that you travelled 701.8 miles in 48hrs and 43 min and averaged 83 mpg. Impressive! What were you doing? Driving around in your local grocery store parking lot for 2 days??
LOL. Just Kidding but I am not sure what you are trying to say that relates to the point about driving about 52 minutes in 5th gear at 60 mph to fully recharge the PHEV battery pack before switching back to electric mode.
Just trying to show that I’m getting 80+ mpg and 700 miles to a tank of fuel.
 

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Just trying to show that I’m getting 80+ mpg and 700 miles to a tank of fuel.
Well glad the super mileage is working out for you. I am on my second IoniqPHEV and I have been very happy with both. The fact that our gas is so cheap lately in North America means you just drive in electric until depleted and then switch to charge mode and continue driving until recharged and keep doing it again and again. Where else do you ever get to drive an ICE powered car and shut it down to cool off 1/3 of the time? You still go the same total miles on the 11.4 gallons of gas, so who cares how you use the 11.4 gallons. At least we have the choice! I find my 2020 Ioniq Ultimate one of the most technologically advanced vehicles on the market today. My particular area has about a dozen free level 2 chargers and we are a small town. I park and shop to take advantage of these wherever possible. It certainly makes it possible to have most days just driving on only electric.
 

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Discussion Starter #73
My first fill-up on the PHEV was very satisfying. 51.2 mpg. 547 mi and 10.085 gal. Used all modes during this period. Some charging, some Sport mode, a lot of EV mileage. Mostly city and suburban driving and hilly city.

Second fill-up was at 970 mi and after 454.2 mi. 10.194 gal for 46.6 mpg. This time I stayed out of EV mode most of the time and no charging from AC line at all. Tried to keep the power meter between half and three quarters. A couple of times, when the charge got below half, I ran in Sport mode until battery charged to three quarters, then went back to strictly HEV. Some mileage was expressway but 70% was as the first run.

Now I plan to try to use as little gas as possible for this third run. Lots of charging and all EV if possible.
Update: Sept 10, 2020: presently have 1870 miles since last fill-up and gas gauge still shows 1/4 tank left. Plan to fill tank tomorrow as have a trip coming up next week and have a 20 cent bonus discount on gas that needs to be used by Saturday. I'm guessing about 200 mpg at this point. Very happy with this mileage. Would have spent $120 during this time with my old Elantra and I was happy with it's mileage.
 
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Not to get off topic here. On your photos you are 3 bars down on the SOC. My IC kicks in with 4 bars left and never gets lower. How do you get to use the xtra bars of HEV?
 

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Not to get off topic here. On your photos you are 3 bars down on the SOC. My IC kicks in with 4 bars left and never gets lower. How do you get to use the xtra bars of HEV?
Driving at high speeds will sometimes drain the battery even with the car in HEV mode. The car tries to balance boosts from the electric motor with periods of generation, but with headwinds or a steady uphill it gets the math wrong and the negative average slowly drains the battery. I've been down to 5% with one bar showing, gotten a little panicky, and slowed down. If I'd been thinking more clearly I would have just gone to Sport mode and dropped a gear, or better yet just carried on to see how the car would handle it, but I had passengers and it was late so I took the safe option of just slowing from 120 to 110 km/h. That was enough for it to recover some charge.
 

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Driving at high speeds will sometimes drain the battery even with the car in HEV mode. The car tries to balance boosts from the electric motor with periods of generation, but with headwinds or a steady uphill it gets the math wrong and the negative average slowly drains the battery. I've been down to 5% with one bar showing, gotten a little panicky, and slowed down. If I'd been thinking more clearly I would have just gone to Sport mode and dropped a gear, or better yet just carried on to see how the car would handle it, but I had passengers and it was late so I took the safe option of just slowing from 120 to 110 km/h. That was enough for it to recover some charge.
I drive very conservatively and have noticed the couple of times we've managed longer than 40m trips and used HEV that the vehicle switches from EV to HEV only around 14-15%.
 

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Driving at high speeds will sometimes drain the battery even with the car in HEV mode. The car tries to balance boosts from the electric motor with periods of generation, but with headwinds or a steady uphill it gets the math wrong and the negative average slowly drains the battery. I've been down to 5% with one bar showing, gotten a little panicky, and slowed down. If I'd been thinking more clearly I would have just gone to Sport mode and dropped a gear, or better yet just carried on to see how the car would handle it, but I had passengers and it was late so I took the safe option of just slowing from 120 to 110 km/h. That was enough for it to recover some charge.
If you are driving in the mountains in Utah, I have had it go down to 1% but then the computer takes over and without any action on your part the on-board starter/generator will engage and recharge to 15%. This took place on cruise control at 72mph without changing anything. The car’s computer is programmed to protect the battery pack from severe discharge.
 

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Discussion Starter #79
My first fill-up on the PHEV was very satisfying. 51.2 mpg. 547 mi and 10.085 gal. Used all modes during this period. Some charging, some Sport mode, a lot of EV mileage. Mostly city and suburban driving and hilly city.

Second fill-up was at 970 mi and after 454.2 mi. 10.194 gal for 46.6 mpg. This time I stayed out of EV mode most of the time and no charging from AC line at all. Tried to keep the power meter between half and three quarters. A couple of times, when the charge got below half, I ran in Sport mode until battery charged to three quarters, then went back to strictly HEV. Some mileage was expressway but 70% was as the first run.

Now I plan to try to use as little gas as possible for this third run. Lots of charging and all EV if possible.
OK, here are the results of my experiment with the worlds best "golf cart", LOL. On 9/11/20 I had to fill my tank because I needed to go on a 140 mi round trip and was showing about 170 HEV miles left and didn't want to push my luck what with unexpected detours or such. Filling tank took 8.889 U.S. gal. Trip odometer which was set to zero at last fill-up now reads 1907.8 mi. So that gives us 214.6 mpg. Whoa, I can live with that. Even motor scooters don't do that good. I love my IONIQ.
 
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