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Not got the PHEV but my hybrid will do 600 miles and more on a full tank . Just begs the question " What's the point of a PHEV ? " , especially in the UK where it's about £8000 dearer than the Hybrid in the UK .
Not a criticism of your post just an observation :)
Well I would say that the point of a PHEV is to allow total electric driving virtually all the time if your daily use is 35 to 38 miles or less until you can return home. So you could in theory never use any gas but of course in that case you might as well have bought a used Leaf or something with only 100 miles of range or so for probably $10,000 or less.But a PHEV simply lets you do that but then still have the same hybrid when driving on a long trip. Also on any long trip, if you wish to be kind in driving through cities, you can simply drive in sport mode when you know you are 50 minutes from the city and you will arrive there with a full charge. With gas less than $1 a litre here in Canada and mostly less than $2.25 a gallon in the US any small loss in mpg while charging is well worth it and pretty much a wash when you then drive on the recovered electric charge. The average Mpg will shoot back up drastically when you drive for 34 to 38 miles on electric again through cities or heavy stop and go traffic.
you mentioned 8000 pounds difference in price which is nearly $14,000 in Canadian money. The difference here in Canada or the US is nowhere near that amount. Have to speak to my Hyundai dealer this a m so I will ask and let you know.
Just some alternative thoughts from my own experiences with my Ioniq.
😀
 

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TLDR: Based on engine efficiency considerations ActionJack was probably right, and it is likely that average fuel economy even with the gas engine charging the PHEV battery will end up in the 50mpg range even if the user spends a substantial portion of time in sport mode. On the whole it is probably a slight hit from hybrid mode, but its not as inefficient as I would have initially thought.

For what its worth, I tried it pretty non scientifically on a drive this past weekend for about a 10 minute stretch of driving. The numbers ended up ballpark what Action Jack described, with about ~35mpg in fifth gear in sport mode and ~45mpg in sixth gear in a 50-60mph range ( i was in the Greater Boston area so wasn't a good time to set the cruise).

I did notice that in fifth gear, the engine RPMs in this speed range was around 2000rpm, which is empirically the most mechanically efficient operating region for the engine, while in sixth gear for the speeds I was at, the engine RPMs were in the 1000rpm range which is good for fuel efficiency but not optimal from an engine efficiency/brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) standpoint. I went from 52.5% SOC to 66.5%SOC during this experiment. I have cumulative energy and cumulative energy discharged readings from my Bluetooth OBD as well and this went from 816.8/789.7 kWh to 819.1/790.6kWh, for a net charge of 1.4kWh into the battery in about 18 minutes. So this actually implies a charge rate of 4.7kW into the battery, or an equivalent of 5.4kW from a charger if 86% charging efficiency is assumed, which once again is consistent with Jack's claims.

In hybrid mode from the same meter in similar conditions I was averaging about 55-60mpg instantaneous. I was trying to keep the rpms of the engine in the 1500-2000 range whenever the engine engaged (pulse and glide operation), although I'm not sure how well I pulled it off.

My conclusion is for optimal efficiency HEV is probably still the right way to go, especially if you take the underlying lesson and try to load the engine whenever it engages (as opposed to cruising at low rpm), basically Pulse and Glide. But if you wanted to gain a reserve of 5-10 electric miles over an open stretch of highway anticipating traffic later this is indeed a viable method.

What you probably don't want to do is charge the battery this way and immediately kick into EV mode at a >70MPH cruising speed though. I have a hard time seeing EV mode operation being as efficient as the gas engine, since EV range degrades significantly at these kinds of highway speeds.
Mr. Wang:
Very interesting. I would be curious to know your results in some longer time and distance trials. Time to charge would seem to be the important factor here. You would see that in 6th gear it takes more than one and one half hours while in 5th gear it only takes 50 minutes.
Also I would agree with you about electric driving above 65 mph. You won’t get any 30 to 35 miles. More like 25 or 26 but saving that full electric charge for slower driving later could very much offset the lower mpg in 5th gear. Also maybe consider this. Look at a U S map and see Interstate 80 from Omaha to Cheyenne. US 34, a two lane hwy through many towns, runs totally parallel to 80 for nearly 500 miles. Supposing you were a retired person and not in any hurry to get anywhere? Every time you fully recharged, you could get off and drive US 34 for 1/2 an hour to 40 minutes at 55 to 60 mph on electric and travel 34 to 48 miles. This might add an hour or two during a thousand mile plus trip. Everyone’s driving style and driving time requirements are different and I think that guy Jack had some excellent points. I believe also, if I read your post correctly that you are saying that it does not have to be all one way or all the other. It appears one could drive in hybrid as much as they liked during the 600 mile range of the car but could easily insert 50 minutes of charge time also anywhere in the 600 miles and use as needed or desired. If one had the time to fool around and “play” with these features, (as Jack maintained he did), the results might be very very surprising.
I’m ‘jus’ sayin!
 

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And my hybrid does 700 miles to a tank. Not a meaningful metric.

Just as the mpg is completely irrelevant in a PHEV. All depends on the usual HEV performance (which is lower than the HEV only model) plus how often it is plugged in.

If it was more efficient to run cars as a serial hybrid, that is to run the engine extra on purpose to charge the battery, manufacturers would be designing them that way on purpose (a la the BMW i3 with range extender) and be recommending to current owners to leave the car in Sport mode for best efficiency.

But no, there is clearly a conspiracy on the part of manufacturers and the automotive press to hide the truth from us.
 

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Well I would say that the point of a PHEV is to allow total electric driving virtually all the time if your daily use is 35 to 38 miles or less until you can return home. So you could in theory never use any gas but of course in that case you might as well have bought a used Leaf or something with only 100 miles of range or so for probably $10,000 or less.But a PHEV simply lets you do that but then still have the same hybrid when driving on a long trip. Also on any long trip, if you wish to be kind in driving through cities, you can simply drive in sport mode when you know you are 50 minutes from the city and you will arrive there with a full charge. With gas less than $1 a litre here in Canada and mostly less than $2.25 a gallon in the US any small loss in mpg while charging is well worth it and pretty much a wash when you then drive on the recovered electric charge. The average Mpg will shoot back up drastically when you drive for 34 to 38 miles on electric again through cities or heavy stop and go traffic.
you mentioned 8000 pounds difference in price which is nearly $14,000 in Canadian money. The difference here in Canada or the US is nowhere near that amount. Have to speak to my Hyundai dealer this a m so I will ask and let you know.
Just some alternative thoughts from my own experiences with my Ioniq.
😀
No need to quote your dealer I don't intend emigrating to Canada in the future ...too old now ;) . As you say the PHEV is ideal for daily use of 35 to 38 miles , especially if you can charge it either end . Unfortunately it doesn't fit my driving patterns and would be pointless for me
 

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I enjoy reading the various ideas and opinions on this forum. And the lively discussion around Action John's experiences with the phev and now corroborated by BionxJack help to remind me to keep an open mind. I really enjoy my phev Ioniq and continue to be amazed at the technology that Hyundai has incorporated in it.
 

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To be fair based on consistent quirks in their postings, i'm pretty sure BionxJohn and ActionJack are the same guy :)

I'll consider my experiences to also corroborate Action Jack's initial posting, so I agree with keeping the open mind part.
 

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And my hybrid does 700 miles to a tank. Not a meaningful metric.

Just as the mpg is completely irrelevant in a PHEV. All depends on the usual HEV performance (which is lower than the HEV only model) plus how often it is plugged in.

If it was more efficient to run cars as a serial hybrid, that is to run the engine extra on purpose to charge the battery, manufacturers would be designing them that way on purpose (a la the BMW i3 with range extender) and be recommending to current owners to leave the car in Sport mode for best efficiency.

But no, there is clearly a conspiracy on the part of manufacturers and the automotive press to hide the truth from us.
Well Mr Yticolev perhaps you are right. The president clearly sees a lot of conspiracies that no one else seems to. I guess I was just happy to learn about a totally alternative way to use my Ioniq from someone posting on this forum. It was great and he was dead accurate.
For point of interest, I just received an e mail from Hyundai Canada Customer Service that I had requested a reply about this.
I will quote for you as follows but it seems to answer what I had asked,
”Dear Mr .......
Sport mode is designed to give the feeling of performance. When Sport Mode is selected gear shifting will be delayed by the Transmission control unit and the engine RPM will increase compared to ECO and normal mode. The Hybrid control unit will take advantage of this by having the output of the hybrid starter generator increased so that another strategy of sport mode is to use the drive motor as a generator at steady cruising speed(highway cruise control). These two strategies will increase fuel consumption which will be regained back when switching to electric mode again. Also in sport mode the re-generative braking level will be the same as in ECO (level 2). The strategy result will differ depending on driving condition: driver, road condition, climate condition. This will not harm the system in any way. This strategy is used by drivers of our Ioniq’s in many different parts of the world”
We hope you find this information helpful.

Best regards,

signature and employee number of the person who responded to me

so I guess this totally sums it up from the company. Maybe you are right yticolev and the company had been hiding this as part of a conspiracy but in any case Mr Jack seems to have been totally correct in the findings he reported.
Hope this was helpful to you.
😀
 

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To be fair based on consistent quirks in their postings, i'm pretty sure BionxJohn and ActionJack are the same guy :)

I'll consider my experiences to also collaborate Action Jack's initial posting, so I agree with keeping the open mind part.
Again, very interesting.
 

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No need to quote your dealer I don't intend emigrating to Canada in the future ...too old now ;) . As you say the PHEV is ideal for daily use of 35 to 38 miles , especially if you can charge it either end . Unfortunately it doesn't fit my driving patterns and would be pointless for me
I understand. I did just finish with them on the phone however and with the Federal rebate payable on the PHEV, the difference is less than $4,000 Canadian.
In any case they are fun, gas sipping inexpensive cars to operate.
 

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I understand. I did just finish with them on the phone however and with the Federal rebate payable on the PHEV, the difference is less than $4,000 Canadian.
In any case they are fun, gas sipping inexpensive cars to operate.
As I said , and this applies to the UK , it is far more expensive over here . No government rebate for the PHEV ( EV only ) and far more expensive gas/petrol .They spoil you that side of the pond :) . And in all honesty, I don't think I'd be pleased with a range of 600 miles on a tank with the PHEV when I already get/gotten more range on my last 2 Ioniq hybrids
 

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As I said , and this applies to the UK , it is far more expensive over here . No government rebate for the PHEV ( EV only ) and far more expensive gas/petrol .They spoil you that side of the pond :) . And in all honesty, I don't think I'd be pleased with a range of 600 miles on a tank with the PHEV when I already get/gotten more range on my last 2 Ioniq hybrids
I would say they have obviously served you well!
 

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Not got the PHEV but my hybrid will do 600 miles and more on a full tank . Just begs the question " What's the point of a PHEV ? "
A bit late to this conversation but fortunately there was a government rebate when I bought my PHEV. It was 3 years ago today when I went to my grandaughter's birthday party and parked behind a 'strange' car which I noted was an Ioniq. Thus began a love affair that has continued to this day. Anyway back on topic, sort of.
I last filled up on 15th March, that in itself is quite rare as I usually only put about 10litres/2 gallons in. Since then I have done 681 miles and my petrol range is 502 miles. I hasten to add that is not my usual pattern. However during the freak effects of lockdown I actually did 340 miles without using any petrol! Charging overnight on a cheap electric tariff it cost me about 1p per mile. In case you are wondering why I did not go full EV at that time. I am retired and being free to roam I have enough journeys close to or beyond that range to make it too much hassle.
 

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A bit late to this conversation but fortunately there was a government rebate when I bought my PHEV. It was 3 years ago today when I went to my grandaughter's birthday party and parked behind a 'strange' car which I noted was an Ioniq. Thus began a love affair that has continued to this day. Anyway back on topic, sort of.
I last filled up on 15th March, that in itself is quite rare as I usually only put about 10litres/2 gallons in. Since then I have done 681 miles and my petrol range is 502 miles. I hasten to add that is not my usual pattern. However during the freak effects of lockdown I actually did 340 miles without using any petrol! Charging overnight on a cheap electric tariff it cost me about 1p per mile. In case you are wondering why I did not go full EV at that time. I am retired and being free to roam I have enough journeys close to or beyond that range to make it too much hassle.
David, it seems to me that it would be the prime example of why to have a PHEV. In what you describe you have as much of an EV as any Tesla, yet you can drive anywhere without concern if you choose to or need to but you have spent likely only 60% or so of the cost of a Cheaper model Tesla.
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To be fair based on consistent quirks in their postings, i'm pretty sure BionxJohn and ActionJack are the same guy :)
Good catch! Some people will do anything for validation.
 

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A bit late to this conversation but fortunately there was a government rebate when I bought my PHEV. It was 3 years ago today when I went to my grandaughter's birthday party and parked behind a 'strange' car which I noted was an Ioniq. Thus began a love affair that has continued to this day. Anyway back on topic, sort of.
I last filled up on 15th March, that in itself is quite rare as I usually only put about 10litres/2 gallons in. Since then I have done 681 miles and my petrol range is 502 miles. I hasten to add that is not my usual pattern. However during the freak effects of lockdown I actually did 340 miles without using any petrol! Charging overnight on a cheap electric tariff it cost me about 1p per mile. In case you are wondering why I did not go full EV at that time. I am retired and being free to roam I have enough journeys close to or beyond that range to make it too much hassle.
That's as it should be and exactly why I said I'd be disappointed with 600 miles on a full tank
 

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Good catch! Some people will do anything for validation.
Good theory but untrue. Does not change that the numbers are correct.
Good catch! Some people will do anything for validation.
not sure who you think needs validation. Sure isn’t Acting Jack. Mr Wang has already totally validated everything he said. Not Me?? I have personally done it and although I don’t have Mr Wang’s technical expertise so I don’t understand half of what he says. But I do understand when he says it appears Jack’s figures are accurate. I tried it and I know what the vehicle can do. Plus Hyundai Canada sent me an e mail answer that I typed verbatim for you also confirming what Jack said. What does it take to get you to say, “gee. I am surprised. I would not have thought it worked like that! I..... GUESS.......I...... WAS.... WRONG....
Very, very difficult for some folks I guess.
cheers. 🍺🍺
 

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Wow, you guys are as alike as two peas in a pod! Prose, punctuation, argumentativeness.
 

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Wow, you guys are as alike as two peas in a pod! Prose, punctuation, argumentativeness.
You..... are.... wrong..... in.... everything........ you have.... said.... about what.... is..... impossible.... for..... an Ioniq..... PHEV.....to do.... ! And you sir, have the ultimate lock up on argumentativeness
I have stated what the vehicle can and will do and you continue to argue that it cannot and won’t do these things. Who is the one arguing here?
what is it that keeps you attacking me personally and prevents you from admitting you were wrong about the Ioniq. You continue to argue all over the place about trolls and magic and fantasy but something is preventing you from replying to Mr Wang and telling him he cannot be correct in saying that Jack’s figures are accurate. Many people are alike in this world and have similar personalities but when people come to the same conclusions from the same sets of facts, it does not make a conspiracy, just a simple arrival at the correct answer. Driving an Ioniq PHEV while charging it is simply not a bad, wrong, dumb, impossible or unreasonable way of using the vehicles’ capabilities. It is merely an alternative way to doing something from the way that you do it. And the net result is a more or less equal balance. How many different people do you require to tell you this before you are able to accept it?
One more time for your clarification! Charging a PHEV while driving is not a wrong way to use the car. It is an alternative way and can prove very useful in many circumstances.
This is supposed to be a friendly, open forum where Ioniq owners share ideas and actual experiences. It is not intended to be some sort of “lay in wait to criticize “ someone doing something you don’t do. You have continued to insult me for hours now and I have no idea why. How about just answering one simple question? Do you, yes or no, accept that an Ioniq PHEV will Perform exactly as Mr Acting Jack said it would in his original post? Remember Mr Wang says it appears it will. I have tried it and I say it will. Hyundai customer service put it in writing that it will. Your answer if you please? Yes? Or No?
 
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