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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, my first post here - greetings from Dublin!

Planning to buy an Ioniq EV today or tomorrow, just getting best prices from dealers / negotiating at the moment

Here in Ireland we get a €5k subsidy on full EV, then we get a €5k discount on the VRT (kind of like a registration tax) and to top that off, Hyundai is giving €4k scrappage when you trade in any old car you have. And we get a free home charging point (€1k). This is just too good to miss, had the Ioniq on an extended 24h test drive yesterday and I just have to buy one >:)
 

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Welcome, unkel!

Did you consider anything else? Will you use your car mainly for commuting, and around Dublin? What's the charging network like outside Dublin?

Blooming' heck, does that mean that you get your Ioniq EV for free :)
I'm jealous of of the incentives you get in Ireland! I think I received a £700 subsidy for my Prius purchase back in 2004...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks asfafa! I'll rub it in a bit more. All public charging in Ireland is free too :laugh:

The CCS network is not great, just about adequate in most of the country south of the Galway - Dublin axis. Go north of the axis and you'd struggle. To go from Dublin to the north west of the country, there is a 174km (109 mile) gap between 2 CCS chargers. No problem in the Ioniq if you keep your motorway speeds legal, but still.

Car is used for all sorts, mostly short trips around Dublin. Family of 5, but I do have another car for my driving pleasure >:)

My dear old Jaguar S-type 3l V6 petrol is going to be traded in. The Ioniq EV will be an adjustment down in terms of space, comfort, luxury and refinement. But I will enjoy not forking out big money at the petrol station once a week. And a car that is virtually maintenance free and 100% covered by warranty for a long time. Planning to hold onto the Ioniq for 5-6 years, so depreciation is not a big worry. I know that better cars will come along with more range and what not, but that's the nature of evolving tech. I'm not too worried about it. Nice time to be alive and all that jazz :)
 

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welcome Unkel


glad you liked the Ioniq, we only get a 15-20 minute test drive over here, so we are jealous of you getting a 24hour testdrive


I love Dublin, fantastic place, people are so friendly loads of history and atmosphere


and by the sounds of it they are all but giving the EV's away


will be interesting to if the taxi drivers start trading in their prius's or skoda's for Ioniqs at those give away prices


what was your list of good and bad points of the EV
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This was the review I posted on my local forum last night after my 24h testdrive :

"
Drove the Ioniq EV for about 160km since yesterday. Mix of all sorts of roads, town driving, up the Dublin mountains, and motorway (120km/h). And I drove it hard. Harder than I would have driven my normal car. Plenty of foot down acceleration, had the car in sports mode most of the time. And the range went down by about 160km too. That is doubly impressive. Not only is the range indicator seemingly very accurate, but also that the car does have a substantial range. There's no doubt in my mind the car can come very close to the promised 280km range if you don't push it like I did

Now for some negatives. This is a cheap car. It looks cheap and it feels cheap. The interior is cheap, the materials are cheap and the seats are basic and cheap. Not much back support there either. Cheap. But not quite so cheap it is nasty. My last 10 or so main cars were mainly BMWs, with a Saab, Rover and a Jaguar thrown in, so I guess I'm used to substantially better interiors. I guess if you came from another cheap car like a Toyota Avensis or a Skoda Octavia, Nissan Leaf, you would perceive of the car being in about the same class.

The car is loaded with bells & whistles as standard, nothing is an optional extra. I won't go into the details much, but everything you expect is there and then some. LED lights, active cruise control with lane assist (something not even standard on some €50k cars, never mind a car half that money), 8" touch screen satnav, rear camera with radar warnings, bluetooth, Android auto / Apple carplay, wireless charging of your phone. The latter actually works amazingly well. The phone easily slots in at an angle and charges without interruption. The regenerative braking level can be controlled by steering wheel paddles. There are 4 settings from 0 (coasting like a manual car not in gear), 1 (coasting like an automatic car in drive), 2 and 3 for active and aggressive regen braking. Use whatever you like. I quite like level 2 and 3 myself. Herself preferred 1 (it's like what she is used to)

The Ioniq drives well, it is light for an EV (1420kg) but has a very low centre of gravity because of the heavy battery. It accelerates from standstill very well, particularly in sport mode. This is a huge benefit of an EV. All the torque is available immediately. You'd need a 3l or 4l petrol engined car to keep up for the first bit off the lights. Then it flattens off, but the official 0-100km/h time is 9.9s is by no means slow. It is a lot quicker than the Leaf and funny enough the exact same time as my previous car, an '04 BMW 520i 2.2l 6 cylinder petrol automatic.

That said, it is not a sports car. It is not a drivers car. It has front wheel drive, which is never good, but less so again for a car with a good bit of torque. Accelerate hard from standstill while turning the steering wheel and the torque steer is so bad the car feels like it is going to eat its own wheel. Terrible. Treat it a bit gentler and it's fine, accelerating while in and coming out of a slower bend is actually quite fun. The car has a comfortable ride. Not too soft, but certainly not too hard either

Space is adequate for a family of 5 but I'm a bit concerned going forward 4 or 5 years when I'll have 3 teenagers in the back. Leg space is ok, but I don't think anyone over about 1.78m (5'10 or 5'11) in height would have enough head space. Boot is not big, but more than big enough for the weekly shop and the rear bench can be folded down (in two unequal parts). Fine for my needs, but if you use a large double buggy and some other stuff, you might be in trouble

Now the value for money. Let's not make any mistakes. This is an almost €40k retail price car. We get a €5k subsidy from the government and another €5k discount on the VRT. Then Hyundai give you another €4k scrappage, so this ends up as a €25k car (plus delivery charges and extras), which is incredible value for money, considering it costs just €120 to tax it, is in the cheapest insurance bracket, costs almost nothing in maintenance, and last but not least, you can charge this car up at home from empty to full for just €2. And completely free on any public charge point. You also get a free charging point installed at your home

5 year full warranty on the car and 8 years on the battery

The future was always going to be electric cars, but now there is one that actually looks and feels like a normal car. A car that is cheaper to own than a similar car with a fossil fuel burning engine. With a range that most people can easily live with. That future is the Hyundai Ioniq EV.
"
 

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interesting write up from a different point of view, most of us think the interior is good quality and plenty of space in the boot, but we are coming from similar size / type cars in the main


you are coming from the larger / higher end of the market, which goes to show everything is relative to the starting point you are coming from


quick question, why do you say the materials are cheap? I assume coming from the cars you are its the lack of wood / chrome, just an expanse of grey plastics is some of the reasons,


but how much would it add to the price of the Ioniq be if the more expensive / higher quality materials were used? and would the car still have the appeal and market it seems to be generating at the higher price?


some of the interesting things I find is the range of people that are looking at and buying the Ioniq's, people like me coming from smaller cars like the i20, people from similar cars like the Prius, and people from the higher end like BMW's etc.


also the number of people for who the Ioniq is their first hybrid or EV


it does seem to have quite broad appeal across a wide range of customers
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes, you assume right. I'm used to higher end (but older and fairly low value) cars. The motor tax system in Ireland is punitive for older cars. My Jaguar S-type, although worth very little, costs €422 per 3 months to tax. I also have a classic sports car (well from the 90s, so a youngtimer), that I rarely use. Still the tax on it is €305 per 3 months. So basically, while my total annual mileage is low and my cars depreciate very little, my tax bill alone is just short of 3 thousand euro per year! Shocking, right?

I couldn't hack that any longer. So when finally a decent family size EV comes along that has a decent range and is heavily subsidised by our government, I just had to take the leap! By comparison, the annual tax on the Ioniq is €120 here.
 

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In another topic I have shown how my 29-er mountainbike easily fits in the car, without adapting anything of the bike. This big Specialized bike (I am 180 cm) with 29 inch wheels and a very wide steer shows there is a lot of space.

In the back seats there is still enough head room for my son of 185 cm sitting straight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Vroeg op, Jan! ;)

That's an interesting point. I didn't try sit in the back myself but from reading reviews I though people over about 1.78m would struggle. I'm 1.87m myself and my daughters might reach 180cm, so I thought I might have a problem in a few years time.

I presume you are tall yourself, and your son doesn't sit behind you in the Ioniq or he would not have enough leg room?
 

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Ja, vroeg ritme.

Leg room is also good for the back seats, on both sides. There is more leg room than in my previous 2013 Prius Plug In, at least 10 cm more. My son of 185 cm is usually on the front passenger seat, but I once used him to measure the back seats. Some of his team members are often on the back seats when I drive them to a football match a bit further away. I think your 187 cm is just about 2 cm too much to sit straight on the back seats. Then you have to sit or rather hang like you perhaps usually hang on your couch at home, maybe with a small pillow in your lower back... Then it is good to have enough leg room.
 
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I'm 6'1" and after my test drive I jumped into the back behind the drivers seat before turning it off (so the seat was in the same position I drove it) and I fitted comfortably in the back with enough room to get my hands between my knees and the seat back.
Then again I have a natural slouch (bad posture) so maybe that's why I found headroom OK!
 
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