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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone knows the Price of Ioniq 5 in USA? I believe if it's equivalent or lower than ID4, it will do well here in the USA. Otherwise, it's going to miss out the demand. Already ID4 is readily available with VW dealerships at least in Dallas,Texas.
I hope Hyundai will price it comparitively lower than VW ID4.
 

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Hi Nanda, It’s a better car (technology and design-wise) than the ID4, so expect it to cost a bit more. Prices for the US have not been released yet.
 

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Does anyone knows the Price of Ioniq 5 in USA? I believe if it's equivalent or lower than ID4, it will do well here in the USA. Otherwise, it's going to miss out the demand. Already ID4 is readily available with VW dealerships at least in Dallas,Texas.
I hope Hyundai will price it comparitively lower than VW ID4.
Just based on the matchbook sized Kona, which is 48K well equipped, I wouldn’t count on it.
 

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Does anyone knows the Price of Ioniq 5 in USA? I believe if it's equivalent or lower than ID4, it will do well here in the USA. Otherwise, it's going to miss out the demand. Already ID4 is readily available with VW dealerships at least in Dallas,Texas.
I hope Hyundai will price it comparitively lower than VW ID4.
Pricing in the US has not been announced yet. The best guess is that it'll be priced somewhere in the vicinity of the ID.4/Mach E/EV6. It is expected to perhaps be slightly cheaper than the EV6 (The first edition of which is around $58k, so maybe around $55kish top spec?) but we really don't know. Please note that the small battery configurations will not be offered in the US, so when we do know, make sure to compare like for like (unless you wanted the short range battery)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just based on the matchbook sized Kona, which is 48K well equipped, I wouldn’t count on it.
Hi Nanda, It’s a better car (technology and design-wise) than the ID4, so expect it to cost a bit more. Prices for the US have not been released yet.
Model Y costs 52k with a 326 mile range, more or less proven in terms of technology. Ioniq 5 is a newbie with a brand new platform. Even for that matter, ID4 has been around and somewhat people know it with all it's flaws (software glitches). Am not sure if it's worth if it costs anywhere over 42k. In relative terms, Hyundai is still an underdog compared to Toyota/Honda etc.
 

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Model Y costs 52k with a 326 mile range, more or less proven in terms of technology. Ioniq 5 is a newbie with a brand new platform. Even for that matter, ID4 has been around and somewhat people know it with all it's flaws (software glitches). Am not sure if it's worth if it costs anywhere over 42k. In relative terms, Hyundai is still an underdog compared to Toyota/Honda etc.
I agree, but like it or not, the Y is the car to beat……I hope it can, but fear it won’t even come close. Literally the Kona is 2K less than a Y, that’s 4 times what a Kona is.
 

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Model Y costs 52k with a 326 mile range, more or less proven in terms of technology. Ioniq 5 is a newbie with a brand new platform. Even for that matter, ID4 has been around and somewhat people know it with all it's flaws (software glitches). Am not sure if it's worth if it costs anywhere over 42k. In relative terms, Hyundai is still an underdog compared to Toyota/Honda etc.
Hyundai has been making EVs for a while. We own a Model 3 and its a great car. The IONIQ 5 has en equivalent to Autopilot (Tesla’s main feature next to full self drive which is still beta) and does it better than Tesla. It also has 360 surround video in 3D, has a retractable glass roof cover, and many other options Tesla doesn’t. So not sure I would call Hyundai an underdog from a technology perspective.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Just based on the matchbook sized Kona, which is 48K well equipped, I wouldn’t count on it.
Ioniq 5 costs anywhere above 42k, Tesla Model 5 is a better option. Paying slightly more
I agree, but like it or not, the Y is the car to beat……I hope it can, but fear it won’t even come close. Literally the Kona is 2K less than a Y, that’s 4 times what a Kona is.
You're right. Kona starts 38k in the US. Which idiot will buy a Kona when you can get a ID4 at 39K. Somewhere something is wrong with pricing. If LG/Samsung makes batteries in Korea which are used by VW ID4, how come Kona is as expensive as ID4. Doesn't make sense. I hope someone in Hyundai is thinking about it otherwise Ioniq 5 is destined to fail.
 

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Kona EV/eNiro have skewed pricing like the original Bolt EV as they were never set up for high volume manufacturing nor high volume. The Ioniq 5 is supposed to be a high volume world car so pricing should and needs to be competitive with both established EVs (Model 3 and Y, ID.4) and the traditional ICE segment in which it will compete. As others have already observed, Euro pricing seems to indicate Hyundai is putting a small premium on the Ioniq 5 over the ID.4.
 

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Strangely, I got a few lease quotes in. The Ioniq 5 Ultimate with the Tech Pack beat the Enyaq and ID 4. The Skoda and VW were priced with the smaller battery.
Kona EV/eNiro have skewed pricing like the original Bolt EV as they were never set up for high volume manufacturing nor high volume. The Ioniq 5 is supposed to be a high volume world car so pricing should and needs to be competitive with both established EVs (Model 3 and Y, ID.4) and the traditional ICE segment in which it will compete. As others have already observed, Euro pricing seems to indicate Hyundai is putting a small premium on the Ioniq 5 over the ID.4.
 

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Ioniq 5 costs anywhere above 42k, Tesla Model 5 is a better option. Paying slightly more


You're right. Kona starts 38k in the US. Which idiot will buy a Kona when you can get a ID4 at 39K. Somewhere something is wrong with pricing. If LG/Samsung makes batteries in Korea which are used by VW ID4, how come Kona is as expensive as ID4. Doesn't make sense. I hope someone in Hyundai is thinking about it otherwise Ioniq 5 is destined to fail.
I'm assuming that 42 number is a typo and 52 was meant? In any case, The Model Y costs a few $ shy of 53k these days, and it's worth noting that The I5 has some capabilities that the Model Y does not, for instance a proper instrument cluster display, a HUD, by most accounts better handling and suspension, by most accounts more comfortable seats, proper backup door releases, there's probably more but idk (I think it's pretty neat that the panoramic roof has a retractable cover, but that's a minor thing). Granted, the Model Y accelerates faster, and is more efficient (though not as much as Tesla claims), and there's the supercharger network (but I don't really count that, because that advantage is fading over time). Oh, and in the US the I5's price will effectively be no more than nominal price - $7500. IMO the I5 looks better too (though I wish it had proper paint colors. What the heck is lucid pole Hyundai. Give me a nice red any day)

Point being, tesla's aren't nearly as superior as they used to be relative to the competition. If tesla's competitors were really smart, they'd try to undercut, so assuming the I5 tops out somewhere around 55k or so (though this is a wild guess) that's not the best strategic choice, but not the worst one ever either.
 

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Strangely, I got a few lease quotes in. The Ioniq 5 Ultimate with the Tech Pack beat the Enyaq and ID 4. The Skoda and VW were priced with the smaller battery.
The original 38/28 Ioniq always had lease rates that were competitive and seemed to undercut the actual list prices.

It's probably down to very strong residual values. If the lease companies can almost guarantee low depreciation you can offer much lower deals.

I'd almost completely ruled the 5 out as a replacement for my leased 38kwh Ioniq, but I'm seeing similar deals, and am tempted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hyundai has been making EVs for a while. We own a Model 3 and its a great car. The IONIQ 5 has en equivalent to Autopilot (Tesla’s main feature next to full self drive which is still beta) and does it better than Tesla. It also has 360 surround video in 3D, has a retractable glass roof cover, and many other options Tesla doesn’t. So not sure I would call Hyundai an underdog from a technology perspective.
I never owned an EV before. Find a Tesla to be expensive so me & a couple of friends were interested in Ioniq 5 hoping pricing would be affordable. But now I realize Hyundai Kona is almost similarly priced to a Tesla, meaning Ioniq 5 will be pricey too. :(. At this time fingers crossed.🤞Worst case, we will go with Model 3.
I'm assuming that 42 number is a typo and 52 was meant? In any case, The Model Y costs a few $ shy of 53k these days, and it's worth noting that The I5 has some capabilities that the Model Y does not, for instance a proper instrument cluster display, a HUD, by most accounts better handling and suspension, by most accounts more comfortable seats, proper backup door releases, there's probably more but idk (I think it's pretty neat that the panoramic roof has a retractable cover, but that's a minor thing). Granted, the Model Y accelerates faster, and is more efficient (though not as much as Tesla claims), and there's the supercharger network (but I don't really count that, because that advantage is fading over time). Oh, and in the US the I5's price will effectively be no more than nominal price - $7500. IMO the I5 looks better too (though I wish it had proper paint colors. What the heck is lucid pole Hyundai. Give me a nice red any day)

Point being, tesla's aren't nearly as superior as they used to be relative to the competition. If tesla's competitors were really smart, they'd try to undercut, so assuming the I5 tops out somewhere around 55k or so (though this is a wild guess) that's not the best strategic choice, but not the worst one ever either.
Somehow I can't fathom I5 to be in the same league as Tesla. Maybe am wrong. Tesla is comparable to luxury segment to BMW/Acura/Lexus/Genesis while Hyundai is comparable to Honda/Toyota/VW. So Hyundai should be priced close to VW ID4. Hyundai always had a few features more than Toyota/Honda/VW and priced lower. If Hyundai prices base version of I5 any closer to Tesla(45000$ and above), I wouldn't consider Hyundai I5. If I have to pay 45k, I would spend a little more and go for Tesla. Maybe, Hyundai should undercut some features for the base version like glass roof and price it comparitively to ID4 (Around 38-41k range). Otherwise, I5 doesn't stand a chance. When they bring in Genesis EV, they should target Tesla, not with a Hyundai.
 

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Does anyone knows the Price of Ioniq 5 in USA? I believe if it's equivalent or lower than ID4, it will do well here in the USA. Otherwise, it's going to miss out the demand. Already ID4 is readily available with VW dealerships at least in Dallas,Texas.
I hope Hyundai will price it comparitively lower than VW ID4.
I did happen to see a brand new white ID.4 for the first time driving around by its owner. All other times, someone was taking out for a test drive. I guess they scored, lol.
 

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Ioniq 5 costs anywhere above 42k, Tesla Model 5 is a better option. Paying slightly more


You're right. Kona starts 38k in the US. Which idiot will buy a Kona when you can get an ID4 at 39K. Somewhere something is wrong with pricing. If LG/Samsung makes batteries in Korea which are used by VW ID4, how come Kona is as expensive as ID4. Doesn't make sense. I hope someone in Hyundai is thinking about it otherwise Ioniq 5 is destined to fail.
As Motor-Man has said on his Youtube page, Hyundai is a "metal manufacture distinguished as a car company," they also make food, underwear, and other items according to a friend I have in Korea. This all translates that they have multiple resources at their disposal and seem to build their cars very effectively. However, the cost of batteries is still very expensive in which the customer ends up paying more for an EV. As soon as the price of batteries goes down, Hyundai will be one of the few that will deliver a great product at a terrific price.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I'm assuming that 42 number is a typo and 52 was meant? In any case, The Model Y costs a few $ shy of 53k these days, and it's worth noting that The I5 has some capabilities that the Model Y does not, for instance a proper instrument cluster display, a HUD, by most accounts better handling and suspension, by most accounts more comfortable seats, proper backup door releases, there's probably more but idk (I think it's pretty neat that the panoramic roof has a retractable cover, but that's a minor thing). Granted, the Model Y accelerates faster, and is more efficient (though not as much as Tesla claims), and there's the supercharger network (but I don't really count that, because that advantage is fading over time). Oh, and in the US the I5's price will effectively be no more than nominal price - $7500. IMO the I5 looks better too (though I wish it had proper paint colors. What the heck is lucid pole Hyundai. Give me a nice red any day)

Point being, tesla's aren't nearly as superior as they used to be relative to the competition. If tesla's competitors were really smart, they'd try to undercut, so assuming the I5 tops out somewhere around 55k or so (though this is a wild guess) that's not the best strategic choice, but not the worst one ever either.
Maybe it's
I'm assuming that 42 number is a typo and 52 was meant? In any case, The Model Y costs a few $ shy of 53k these days, and it's worth noting that The I5 has some capabilities that the Model Y does not, for instance a proper instrument cluster display, a HUD, by most accounts better handling and suspension, by most accounts more comfortable seats, proper backup door releases, there's probably more but idk (I think it's pretty neat that the panoramic roof has a retractable cover, but that's a minor thing). Granted, the Model Y accelerates faster, and is more efficient (though not as much as Tesla claims), and there's the supercharger network (but I don't really count that, because that advantage is fading over time). Oh, and in the US the I5's price will effectively be no more than nominal price - $7500. IMO the I5 looks better too (though I wish it had proper paint colors. What the heck is lucid pole Hyundai. Give me a nice red any day)

Point being, tesla's aren't nearly as superior as they used to be relative to the competition. If tesla's competitors were really smart, they'd try to undercut, so assuming the I5 tops out somewhere around 55k or so (though this is a wild guess) that's not the best strategic choice, but not the worst one ever either.
Hyu
I don't understand this reasoning. Tesla, Hyundai, Genesis are just brands. If the Hyundai has more features than the Tesla, why should it be priced lower just because it is a Hyundai?
Good point. I guess a Toyota Avalon and Lexus ES have same platform/engine/HP/features etc, but Lexus costs more. Hyundai Sonata costs less than Toyota Camry though there are more features in Sonata and is heavily discounted. Infact Hyundai has a higher warranty.
Hyundai doesn't have a EV track record at least in US with very little sales of Kona/Nero
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hyundai sold over 100,000 Kona EVs globally as of July 2020. That’s nothing to sneeze at.
Is it? Sorry I didn't knew that. I have seen lots of other Hyundai's but not seen Kona's in Texas. Maybe I didn't notice. Infact I had a Hyundai Sonata (2019), and I liked it.
 

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The original 38/28 Ioniq always had lease rates that were competitive and seemed to undercut the actual list prices.

It's probably down to very strong residual values. If the lease companies can almost guarantee low depreciation you can offer much lower deals.

I'd almost completely ruled the 5 out as a replacement for my leased 38kwh Ioniq, but I'm seeing similar deals, and am tempted.
I think you're totally wrong about the Ioniq 38/28 have 'very strong residual' values... I'm in CA and I bought my 2019 CPO 28kW Ioniq EV for $17k plus tax... I think the sticker on it was over $32k... that's some pretty brutal depreciation.
 
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