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Bjorn just posted another video. His conclusion is that you only get full charging speed if the battery temp is between 20 and 45c. A charging session starts out slower than it could, since battery does not preheat on the way to a charger. Then when it rises to over 45, it starts throttling again. He's calling it "rapidgating".

Battery temp over 45 also limits motor output and acceleration, once you are on the road driving. Hotter summer temps could make the situation worse.

 

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2021 Project 45
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Bjorn just posted another video. His conclusion is that you only get full charging speed if the battery temp is between 20 and 45c. A charging session starts out slower than it could, since battery does not preheat on the way to a charger. Then when it rises to over 45, it starts throttling again. He's calling it "rapidgating".

Battery temp over 45 also limits motor output and acceleration, once you are on the road driving. Hotter summer temps could make the situation worse.

Yeah I watched that earlier. My P45 seems to have its vents open most of the time, certainly the times I’ve gotten out to charge or open/close the gates up at my allotment I’ve noticed them wide open.

Every time he pulled back enough to show the vents they were shut on his P45, I wonder if that’s why the battery kept getting so hot and throttling?
 

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I not sure if it’s a wide spread problem at the moment. As Bjørn mentioned, he him self is unsure if it’s a problem with just that car (it is the same Gold P45 demo car Kris Rifa tested) or if it is every IONIQ 5. I don’t think he had the same problems with the Black (non P45) he tested first. There he had no thermal throttling and got much better charging speeds from the start.

We also have to take in consideration that Bjørn and Kris where preforming their 1000/625km challenges/race at the time. They are DC fast charging and unplugging when they have enough SOC to get to the next DC fast charger.

The way I see it at the moment is that there’s a problem with that car. Same car, same testing and the same problem.

Is it just the P45 problem? Does anyone here that has a non P45, AWD model have the same problem?
 

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I’ve done a few long journeys in my P45 and used the Ionity ultra fast chargers. I would have noticed if the car was 100bhp down on power. I noticed that the dealer’s demo car had incorrect tyre pressures just by driving the car. (One was 52psi and the other three 36psi)
 

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2021 Chevy Bolt, reserved Ioniq 5
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Several months ago I observed the charging of Ioniq 5s on you tube. I noted the charging rate versus the % charge for one in Korea and one in Germany. Both show a notch at around 50%. Note the red line starts after the blue line - about 15% versus 5%. I think the notch is due to the rise in battery temperature.
Rectangle Slope Plot Font Parallel

Here is another from Insideevs that show the notch at about 60%. Note the Teslas do not have a notch as they charge at a lower rate after a few %.
Rectangle Slope Font Plot Parallel
 

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Bjorn just posted another video. His conclusion is that you only get full charging speed if the battery temp is between 20 and 45c. A charging session starts out slower than it could, since battery does not preheat on the way to a charger. Then when it rises to over 45, it starts throttling again. He's calling it "rapidgating".
It's interesting though that in his charging test where he tested another vehicle, the temperature goes far beyond 45 C and the speed is not limited.
 

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2021 Chevy Bolt, reserved Ioniq 5
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It's interesting though that in his charging test where he tested another vehicle, the temperature goes far beyond 45 C and the speed is not limited.
I have viewed this viedo several times. The Ioniq 5 drops to the 150 to 180 range at about 55%. But it never drops to the 100 to 130 range I saw in the other videos. I wonder if it has more updated software?
 

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MY20 Kona Highlander electric
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Several months ago I observed the charging of Ioniq 5s on you tube. I noted the charging rate versus the % charge for one in Korea and one in Germany. Both show a notch at around 50%. Note the red line starts after the blue line - about 15% versus 5%. I think the notch is due to the rise in battery temperature.
View attachment 36086
Here is another from Insideevs that show the notch at about 60%. Note the Teslas do not have a notch as they charge at a lower rate after a few %.
View attachment 36087
Yeah, I’ve been thinking that myself. As you suggest in post #29 it should be a fairly easy software fix.
 

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used Ionity fast chargers 3 times last week and did not noticed any throttling.
to 80% brugnato and drive immediately. Max rate I noticed was 184kW.
to 90% versilia, and drove immediately. Outside temp 25c, battery module temp were 29c to 32c. No sign of throttling afterwards. Took some screenshots checking battery temps During the charging for curiosity.

View attachment 35993 View attachment 35994
temp went up to 31c at Pisa, so it was not a cold day, but I never noticed high battery temps so far that might warrant any throttling.

to 90% piacenza, but ended up driving 30 mins later due to eating all you can eat sushi
Seems the thermal power output throttles when max battery is >45C so your temps are fine. Bjorn's temp got to 45 every high speed charge (200kW) so I suspect a coolant circulation pump fail, or pump not circulating during charging maybe.
 

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I’ve never experienced it after using the high capacity chargers but the fastest I’ve charged at has been 218kW and I didn’t try and use full power afterwards.

How big a problem is it really though?
I think it is a big deal. In Australia we get days at 40 degrees so unless there is active heat pump cooling the car will be power restricted all the time after hi speed charging. Any sudden/unexpected/unnotified drop in power output is a serious safety hazard anyway. The car is specified with high power output not sometimes 70kW power for a while.
 

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I think it is a big deal. In Australia we get days at 40 degrees so unless there is active heat pump cooling the car will be power restricted all the time after hi speed charging. Any sudden/unexpected/unnotified drop in power output is a serious safety hazard anyway. The car is specified with high power output not sometimes 70kW power for a while.
Yes, unless new software throttles the charging, rather than the driving, long trips on hot days are going to be a problem.
 

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Given Bjorn saw the problem nearly every hi speed charge with about 50% SOC added it seems his cars were not cooling the battery under normal driving, normal charging conditions. Either a terrible design or a failure in the cooling system such as a faulty circulation pump allowing rapid heat accumulation during charge and general high temps during driving. The early charge curves (out of spec videos) for EV6 were very up and down too suggesting battery thermal limits at 45C and above, so will be interesting to see if the EV6 has the same power output throttle after charging too???
Yes, unless new software throttles the charging, rather than the driving, long trips on hot days are going to be a problem.
Yep I thought that too. I was thinking a manual max charge rate setting maybe, but autothrottle much better.
 

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It's interesting though that in his charging test where he tested another vehicle, the temperature goes far beyond 45 C and the speed is not limited.
This is fascinating, the Ioniq5 had dropped to ~100kW by the time it got to 50C as reported here and ie as expected. It started throttling the charger at 45c I think. The battery fan stayed in zero state throughout too. If Bjorn had taken that car for a spin directly after charging at the point where the temp was 51C it would have been limited to about 70kW motor power. Indeed the charge rate was dramatically cut to keep below 50C. It settled to 48C at about 45kW charge rate at the high SOC near the end.
 

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2018 Soul EV, Ioniq 5 reserved
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This is a concern. What's the point of the ability to rapid charge if it won't rapid charge! It's a major design flaw if it will only rapid charge under ideal conditions, and also when it does overheat it cuts power to the drive motors until the battery temp drops, however long that takes.
 

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No one else on here on the other forums are reporting this issue. If it was such an issue it would be getting reported more widely.
Could just be the car but the fault may also not be appearing because not many users are taking such long non-stop trips with repeated fast charging? Those of us with routine Summer temperatures of 30-40C are looking at this with particular concern as his ambient was closer to 15C!
 

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This is fascinating, the Ioniq5 had dropped to ~100kW by the time it got to 50C as reported here and ie as expected. It started throttling the charger at 45c I think. The battery fan stayed in zero state throughout too. If Bjorn had taken that car for a spin directly after charging at the point where the temp was 51C it would have been limited to about 70kW motor power. Indeed the charge rate was dramatically cut to keep below 50C. It settled to 48C at about 45kW charge rate at the high SOC near the end.
Not sure if the battery fan state is relevant to the ioniq5, does it have forced cooling of the battery coolant radiator? The cooling heating plumbing diagram I saw a while back is complex and I don't pretend to understand how it works.
 

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Not sure if the battery fan state is relevant to the ioniq5, does it have forced cooling of the battery coolant radiator? The cooling heating plumbing diagram I saw a while back is complex and I don't pretend to understand how it works.
The other possibility mentioned by others is a faulty coolant pump in the particular car being tested by Kris and Bjorn (bjorn checked his grill flaps were open), meaning the battery hangs at higher temperature triggering the low power output after charging. The charge curve is similar in all tests and even the EV6 prototype tests. Have no idea if the EV6 test was power limited after. The big charge rate drop off, at the high SOC end of charging, combined with a possible normal cooling process, might get the battery temp down to ~45C (see the video above), enough to allow normal motor power in these other tests. Although the drivers might not have tested high power either. Will be interesting to see how this all pans out.
 
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