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I don't know anyone who drives 298 miles most days. Most journeys are shorter. Fast charging is more of a priority for me.
The cold and the wet (in west UK) has impacted my average consumption. I'm getting an average 3.2 miles per Kwh. The battery percentage goes down very fast when driving 70mph on dual carriageways. I mostly drive in 'normal' mode, 'eco' when on a long stretch of motorway.
 

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One aspect missing from the discussion is how flat the roads are where you are driving. Regeneration is probably about 50% efficient or less. A heavy car needs a lot more energy to climb each hill and you only get 50% back on the downhill at the most. Stop start traffic is very similar. A heavy car needs more energy to accelerate and less than 50% back as you decelerate.
All the reports I have seen for range suggest that the Ioniq 5 has very similar range parameters to the Soul EV I have at the moment. Almost all my driving is charge at home and less than a 200 mile round trip in a day. Longer trips are usually under 200 miles to destination where I charge overnight before the return trip. I have never had to worry about range with the Soul EV, or be concerned about heating etc. I don't expect my Ioniq5 AWD to be any different.
 

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The e-Niro and Kona don't suffer as badly. What have they got so wrong with the new platform? Motorway speeds similarly show big differences. It can't all be down to weight.
You would expect it to be better...

S.
It is not due to weight. It is due to Ioniq5 being big ineficcient un-aerodynamic cow. But that is what customers want these day - big fancy cars with lots of bling bling factor.
And not efficient aerodynamic Classic Ioniq (or a Toyota Prius with eco saver 15 inch wheels). :)
So Hyundai made what "market" wanted. :rolleyes:

And big inefficient fancy cars suffer even more when winter and/or higher speeds kick in.
 

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2021, Hyundai Ioniq 5 Ultimate 73KWh RWD
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I don't know anyone who drives 298 miles most days. Most journeys are shorter. Fast charging is more of a priority for me.
The cold and the wet (in west UK) has impacted my average consumption. I'm getting an average 3.2 miles per Kwh. The battery percentage goes down very fast when driving 70mph on dual carriageways. I mostly drive in 'normal' mode, 'eco' when on a long stretch of motorway.
One reason for purchasing the Ioniq 5 was to go be able to travel up to Mother's care home 240 miles away with minimal if any charging en-route. As the brochure quotes 298 I thought 240 would be reasonable! I am struggling to get 200 miles and that is using 90% of the battery.
 

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I don't know anyone who drives 298 miles most days. Most journeys are shorter.
Yep, I 100% get what you're saying but often for newbie EV converts they start their new EV lives by comparing the 650-mile tank range which they had in their previous BMW ICE vehicles to the first thing that hits them visually when they start-up an I5 in the morning, i.e the range guess-ometer on the 12" display.

Was 298, now 250, now 210, now 180 and so on.

Human nature is a funny old thing but for some strange reason we seem to want the exact same thing that we have just paid a huge amount of cash for; Strange eh!
 

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One aspect missing from the discussion is how flat the roads are where you are driving. Regeneration is probably about 50% efficient or less. A heavy car needs a lot more energy to climb each hill and you only get 50% back on the downhill at the most. Stop start traffic is very similar. A heavy car needs more energy to accelerate and less than 50% back as you decelerate.
All the reports I have seen for range suggest that the Ioniq 5 has very similar range parameters to the Soul EV I have at the moment. Almost all my driving is charge at home and less than a 200 mile round trip in a day. Longer trips are usually under 200 miles to destination where I charge overnight before the return trip. I have never had to worry about range with the Soul EV, or be concerned about heating etc. I don't expect my Ioniq5 AWD to be any different.
I hope you are correct in your assumption?:)
 

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But isn't the results a case of 'it depends': on how heavy your right foot is, how fast you accelerate, how much you judge the distance to brake, how much weight you carry, what you normal 'road' mix is etc. All the stuff that made a difference with a ICE vehicle. How many of you carefully compared your WLTP (or the previous version NEDC) quoted by the manufacturer of your ICE vehicle. Mine ICE certainly wasn't near the figures stated (and one of them was a PHEV which had laughable projected figures). To me it depends what you want to achieve, same as an ICE, if you want long range, drive in ECO with a light foot and I find Auto Regen helps. I am just over 1000 miles and averaging 3.9miles/kw overall - I occasionally get 4.1 on a single journey - the other day I had to go out very early, wasn't warm, drove straight to the dual carriageway 1/2 mile away to do a 20 mile burst quickly, didn't worry about range, put it in sport and had a fun drive - and got 2.4 but didn't care as I won't do that everyday. Relax, enjoy, if you really believed you where going to get the stated manufacturers figures you will be disappointed on every car you buy. And I bet that those of you who still had ICE when the petrol shortage was on managed to improve you ability to get more mpg :) . Obviously, if you are clearly getting very low range whilst driving gently it needs investigation.
 

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But isn't the results a case of 'it depends': on how heavy your right foot is, how fast you accelerate, how much you judge the distance to brake, how much weight you carry, what you normal 'road' mix is etc. All the stuff that made a difference with a ICE vehicle. How many of you carefully compared your WLTP (or the previous version NEDC) quoted by the manufacturer of your ICE vehicle. Mine ICE certainly wasn't near the figures stated (and one of them was a PHEV which had laughable projected figures). To me it depends what you want to achieve, same as an ICE, if you want long range, drive in ECO with a light foot and I find Auto Regen helps. I am just over 1000 miles and averaging 3.9miles/kw overall - I occasionally get 4.1 on a single journey - the other day I had to go out very early, wasn't warm, drove straight to the dual carriageway 1/2 mile away to do a 20 mile burst quickly, didn't worry about range, put it in sport and had a fun drive - and got 2.4 but didn't care as I won't do that everyday. Relax, enjoy, if you really believed you where going to get the stated manufacturers figures you will be disappointed on every car you buy. And I bet that those of you who still had ICE when the petrol shortage was on managed to improve you ability to get more mpg :) . Obviously, if you are clearly getting very low range whilst driving gently it needs investigation.
Thanks for your observations, all good points.
Whilst my Ioniq 5 is at the dealers having problems with the 12V battery shorted out they have lent me an Ioniq EV, with no effort at all I can get between 4.8-5.3 m/KWh from it. In fact I think I go as far in that with its 38KW battery I could as far in that as I could in my Ioniq 5 with it's 72.6 KW battery.
Hyundai have always had reputation for their EVs achieving the WLTP figures! So what have they got so wrong with the Ioniq 5?
Recently I have been seeing about 2.7m/KWh from my car, that is driving it the same as the Ioniq EV in ECO mode. The temperature outside was 13'C
 

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Since it got a bit cooler I'm getting 3m per kWh, down from 3.4 miles per kWh. Once winter hits (and I use things like the heated steering wheel and heated seats for longer periods of time) I'm expecting it to drop further, so very likely putting me under 200 miles. Not great, but this is my first EV so I have nothing to compare it to.

I've switched to the ECO driving mode, which actually suits me better most of the time, and use Auto regen at max.
 

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As said, it depends on the terrain. My battery percentage also went down very quickly when I took a 90% motorway journey and was driving 70 mph.
I have my climate set to 19c most of the time and haven't needed heated seats or wheel yet.
 

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One aspect missing from the discussion is how flat the roads are where you are driving. Regeneration is probably about 50% efficient or less. A heavy car needs a lot more energy to climb each hill and you only get 50% back on the downhill at the most. Stop start traffic is very similar. A heavy car needs more energy to accelerate and less than 50% back as you decelerate.
All the reports I have seen for range suggest that the Ioniq 5 has very similar range parameters to the Soul EV I have at the moment. Almost all my driving is charge at home and less than a 200 mile round trip in a day. Longer trips are usually under 200 miles to destination where I charge overnight before the return trip. I have never had to worry about range with the Soul EV, or be concerned about heating etc. I don't expect my Ioniq5 AWD to be any different.
OP is from Denmark. A.k.a the flattest country in the North. :LOL:
 

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If you are intending to purchase any EV as a first time buyer you should visit the EV database site which quotes real world mileage rates. The WLTP is a theoretical value so you can compare like for like but I don't know any WLTP figures that are accurate. With my I-Pace I have at the moment with an 84.7kWh usable battery I'm lucky to get 2.6 miles per kWh in the summer and nearer 2 miles per kWh in the winter where I live (Highlands of Scotland). Everybody will get different values depending on where they live and the way they drive and it's no different to driving an ICE vehicle. The faster you drive the less mpg you get but for some reason people seem to think an EV should give them the quoted range at all speeds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
If you are intending to purchase any EV as a first time buyer you should visit the EV database site which quotes real world mileage rates. The WLTP is a theoretical value so you can compare like for like but I don't know any WLTP figures that are accurate. With my I-Pace I have at the moment with an 84.7kWh usable battery I'm lucky to get 2.6 miles per kWh in the summer and nearer 2 miles per kWh in the winter where I live (Highlands of Scotland). Everybody will get different values depending on where they live and the way they drive and it's no different to driving an ICE vehicle. The faster you drive the less mpg you get but for some reason people seem to think an EV should give them the quoted range at all speeds.
My Ioniq 2020 is closing up to 2y and 53.000km - so hardly a EV first time buyer ;)
 

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I've switched to the ECO driving mode, which actually suits me better most of the time, and use Auto regen at max.
I played with Autogen on various levels and for economy have found that Auto without limiting to a particular level works better as it allows the car to cruise when there is nothing in front and therefore strengthens if it needs to slow because there is something in front.
 

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I never believe any of those stats! My Qashqai is quoted at 62 mpg lucky if I get 45mpg and my old Volvo XC90 couldn’t even do 250 miles on a tank.
 

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Thanks for your observations, all good points.
Whilst my Ioniq 5 is at the dealers having problems with the 12V battery shorted out they have lent me an Ioniq EV, with no effort at all I can get between 4.8-5.3 m/KWh from it. In fact I think I go as far in that with its 38KW battery I could as far in that as I could in my Ioniq 5 with it's 72.6 KW battery.
Hyundai have always had reputation for their EVs achieving the WLTP figures! So what have they got so wrong with the Ioniq 5?
Recently I have been seeing about 2.7m/KWh from my car, that is driving it the same as the Ioniq EV in ECO mode. The temperature outside was 13'C
A few notable differences:
  • I5 is nearly 400kg heavier (RWD, 72kwh)
  • I5 is 10cm wider
  • I5 is 13cm taller
  • I5 has significantly bigger wheels
Bigger, heaver cars use more energy to move them, period.
 

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As said, it depends on the terrain. My battery percentage also went down very quickly when I took a 90% motorway journey and was driving 70 mph.
I have my climate set to 19c most of the time and haven't needed heated seats or wheel yet.
Not sure if that was aimed at me or a general reply to the thread, but I tend to drive to and from the same locations so give or take a couple of journeys there is no real variance in terrain. The thing that has made the difference as far as I can tell is the five minutes or so that I spend heating the car, which, when it's 5C outside and the car has been out in it all night I don't really see as unreasonable useage. I'm not overly bothered about losing some range to keep my pinkies warm.

I played with Autogen on various levels and for economy have found that Auto without limiting to a particular level works better as it allows the car to cruise when there is nothing in front and therefore strengthens if it needs to slow because there is something in front.
Thanks, that's useful to know. I've tried various permutations and find using the regen set to Auto at max level suits me the best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
A few notable differences:
  • I5 is nearly 400kg heavier (RWD, 72kwh)
  • I5 is 10cm wider
  • I5 is 13cm taller
  • I5 has significantly bigger wheels
Bigger, heaver cars use more energy to move them, period.
Which is why you don't get a WLTP of 622Km even thou the battery is nearly double the size of the Ioniq 2020 ;)
Still. Doesn't explayn why I see so much more difference between WLTP vs Real :/
 

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Which is why you don't get a WLTP of 622Km even thou the battery is nearly double the size of the Ioniq 2020 ;)
Still. Doesn't explayn why I see so much more difference between WLTP vs Real :/
Since WLTP is still done in a lab, under fixed conditions, it stands to reason that it would be difficult to achieve in the real world. I can only assume the bigger variance comes from the all of the previously mentioned differences increasing drag for the Ioniq 5.
 
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