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Discussion Starter #1
Anybody who knows:
1. Total weight.
2. Use of energy. KWh/100 km.
3. Battery chemistry?
 

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Anybody who knows:
1. Total weight.
2. Use of energy. KWh/100 km.
3. Battery chemistry?
I understand it’s the same battery used in the (lower spec) Kona & Niro, but performance in the Ioniq hasn’t been tested as far as I know.
 

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The battery case for the new Ioniq is not the same as used in the New Soul EV, Kona & Niro. These 3 all have an inspection cover on the bottom of the pack seen on the underside of the car, below where the passenger seat is. The new Ioniq pack is placed further back on the car and looks exactly the same as the existing Ioniq pack placement.

There is some info about the battery inside - https://pushevs.com/2019/05/02/new-hyundai-ioniq-family/
 

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The battery case for the new Ioniq is not the same as used in the New Soul EV, Kona & Niro. These 3 all have an inspection cover on the bottom of the pack seen on the underside of the car, below where the passenger seat is. The new Ioniq pack is placed further back on the car and looks exactly the same as the existing Ioniq pack placement.

There is some info about the battery inside - https://pushevs.com/2019/05/02/new-hyundai-ioniq-family/
Thanks for that. Very helpful.

TRT
 

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What battery improvements do the new HEV and PHEV Ioniqs get? Where could I read up on that?
The specs (see the link in “more info” section at the end of JejuSoul’s post) will give you the basics. I can’t see any significant changes from old model there but haven’t looked in detail.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hmmmm.
The old battery (28 kWh) is 360kg.
The new: 38,3/0,1122 = 341kg..... or do I miss something?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Took a new control.
Acording to Issuu.com it is 293kg on first edition.
Then the difference is 341- 293 = 48kg more
Make this sende?
 

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There is one thing I do not understand.

The current version of the Ioniq EV can charge with power up to 70 kW if you use fast chargers with maximal power of 100 kW or more. For the upgraded battery it is indicated 80% in 54 minutes. As 80% of a 38.3 kWh battery is 30.6 kWh, this indication relates to a maximal average charging power of 34 kW. So, that is less than half of the maximal charging speed of the current version, whereas you would expect that a 36% bigger battery would allow 36% higher charging power as well. Is this correct?

If this is true, long distance traveling will not become faster using the upgraded version.
 

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@Jan Treur
Part of the answer is that charging limitations are by current. The 38.3 battery nominal voltage is 319 V as compared to 360 V of the 28 battery, lower voltage means lower power for same current.
Also, the 34 kW charging rate is average, not maximal. The average rate of the 28 is less than 70 kW.

If this is true, long distance traveling will not become faster using the upgraded version.
Agree. As I said in another thread - the 70-80 km head start of the new Ioniq will almost disappear in the first 20 minutes stop at a 100 kW DC station in a long trip...
 

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I would add to my last post:
Another limitation for the refreshed Ioniq may be battery cooling. We don't know details but if it is still forced air cooling the smaller 28 kWh battery has an advantage of being cooled faster.
 

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@Jan Treur
Part of the answer is that charging limitations are by current. The 38.3 battery nominal voltage is 319 V as compared to 360 V of the 28 battery, lower voltage means lower power for same current.
Also, the 34 kW charging rate is average, not maximal. The average rate of the 28 is less than 70 kW.
Considered numerically this difference in voltage is 12%, so that would (for equal current) decrease the allowed charging power by 12% too, so from 70 kW to 62 kW. There is still a gap from 62 to 34 kW to be explained.

Besides, the current can now be distributed over 36% more cells you can say, so assuming the same current per cell, the maximally allowed total current may also be 36% higher. So, not 62 kW but 62 *1.36 = 84 kW. This number has a huge gap with 34 kW. The mystery remains.
 

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I would add to my last post:
Another limitation for the refreshed Ioniq may be battery cooling. We don't know details but if it is still forced air cooling the smaller 28 kWh battery has an advantage of being cooled faster.
Yes, I was also thinking in that direction. Maybe the new battery is more densely packed so that more heat per cm3 is developed?
 

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Considered numerically this difference in voltage is 12%, so that would (for equal current) decrease the allowed charging power by 12% too, so from 70 kW to 62 kW. There is still a gap from 62 to 34 kW to be explained.
As I said, the 34 kW for the Ioniq38 is an average rate while the 70 you mention for the Ioniq28 is maximum and the average is lower (~60?). So 34-60 before voltage effect?

Besides, the current can now be distributed over 36% more cells you can say, so assuming the same current per cell, the maximally allowed total current may also be 36% higher. So, not 62 kW but 62 *1.36 = 84 kW. This number has a huge gap with 34 kW. The mystery remains.
No, Ioniq28 has 96 groups (2 cells each) in series. Don't know about the Ioniq38 but my prediction is 88 groups of 2 in series. So, current limitation of, say, 150 A means 75 A per cell in both cases.
 

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There is one thing I do not understand.

The current version of the Ioniq EV can charge with power up to 70 kW if you use fast chargers with maximal power of 100 kW or more. For the upgraded battery it is indicated 80% in 54 minutes. As 80% of a 38.3 kWh battery is 30.6 kWh, this indication relates to a maximal average charging power of 34 kW. So, that is less than half of the maximal charging speed of the current version, whereas you would expect that a 36% bigger battery would allow 36% higher charging power as well. Is this correct?

If this is true, long distance traveling will not become faster using the upgraded version.
Bjorn Nyland did a road test between the 28kWh Ioniq and the 60kWh Ampera-e.


To start with, the Ampera-e had the advantage with the larger battery and fewer charging stops. However, the Ioniq won over the 1,000km distance because of the faster charging.
 

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No, Ioniq28 has 96 groups (2 cells each) in series. Don't know about the Ioniq38 but my prediction is 88 groups of 2 in series. So, current limitation of, say, 150 A means 75 A per cell in both cases.
I cannot follow these calculations. Should I understand that the battery of the new 38 kWh version has fewer cells (88x2) than the battery of the 28 kWh version (96x2)? How many series are there?
 
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