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Discussion Starter #1
There has been an ongoing discussion on PriusChat regarding the comparisons. Unfortunately, not a lot is known about the Ioniq to date. Some have referred to the Sonata hybrid for answers, but others do not seem to think the Ioniq will share much with the Sonata.

I hope that as more is released, there will be an intense discussion on this thread, and also the technical thread.

Personally, based solely on pictures I've seen of both vehicles, IMHO, the Ioniq wins the visual comparison. It will remain to be seen how they compare in fuel efficiency. Hyundai says it will get better milage than the Prius on the highway. The conjecture is that it will not fare so well in the city. The general feeling is the Ioniq will out-perform the Prius at highway speeds, but be slower at lower speeds.

I'm just repeating some of the discussion. Do not ask me to explain, because I am not an engineer. If you have questions, search out PriusChat forum.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I am repeating a comment I made on another thread:
I hope that Hyundai is re-evaluating some of the design parameters of the Ioniq now that they have seen the new Prius. It appears, at least to me, the Ioniq is very competitive with the 3rd generation Prius. But Toyota made a lot of technical upgrades in the new Prius. If Hyundai wants to compete, adjustments will need to be made ..... and/or, priced considerably lower than the new Prius.

The Ioniq was boasted to be a "Prius killer." In my opinion, the Prius killed itself with it's goofy looks, and Hyundai can take no credit for that. But I have hopes the Ioniq will really be something special by the time it is released here in the USA.
 

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hmm,


prius 124PS or 91KW, compared to 143PSof the ioniq


prius 0-62mph 10.6sec, ioniq 0-62 I think I have seen 10.2 sec so not much in it


both have 0.24 drag coefficient


prius mpg figures look impressive, interesting figures below seem to suggest 15" wheels give a big economy benefit? why?


Alloy wheels 15"/17"
Fuel consumption
Combined (mpg) 94.1/85.6
Urban (mpg) 97.4/85.6
Extra urban (mpg) 91.1/85.6


that looks way better than suggested figures of 55 ish US mpg, about 65 uk mpg


BUT emmissions figures are nearly the same


I think it will come down to price and normal vs goofy looks, and the fact the ioniq has a standard dual clutch gearbox which many will probably prefer


 

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hmm,


prius 124PS or 91KW, compared to 143PSof the ioniq


prius 0-62mph 10.6sec, ioniq 0-62 I think I have seen 10.2 sec so not much in it


both have 0.24 drag coefficient


prius mpg figures look impressive, interesting figures below seem to suggest 15" wheels give a big economy benefit? why?





that looks way better than suggested figures of 55 ish US mpg, about 65 uk mpg


BUT emmissions figures are nearly the same


I think it will come down to price and normal vs goofy looks, and the fact the ioniq has a standard dual clutch gearbox which many will probably prefer


I would assume because of the rotational mass ?
 

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I am repeating a comment I made on another thread:
I hope that Hyundai is re-evaluating some of the design parameters of the Ioniq now that they have seen the new Prius. It appears, at least to me, the Ioniq is very competitive with the 3rd generation Prius. But Toyota made a lot of technical upgrades in the new Prius. If Hyundai wants to compete, adjustments will need to be made ..... and/or, priced considerably lower than the new Prius.

The Ioniq was boasted to be a "Prius killer." In my opinion, the Prius killed itself with it's goofy looks, and Hyundai can take no credit for that. But I have hopes the Ioniq will really be something special by the time it is released here in the USA.
In what way is the Ioniq not competitive with the gen IV Prius?

The gen IV Prius has improved rear suspension. Gone is the torsion bar suspension; it now has more sophisticated double-wishbone suspension. The Ioniq went one better with multi-link rear suspension. No wait, they went 2 better with aluminum components to lessen unsprung weight.

The gen IV Prius has improved engine efficiency claiming 40% thermal efficiency! That's turbo-diesel territory! Ioniq has matched that efficiency.

The gen IV Prius' drag coefficient improves from .25 to .24. The Ioniq matches that.

The gen IV Prius now offers a lithium-ion battery as an extra-cost option over their completely obsolete NiMH which is standard. The Ioniq has a lithium-ion battery as standard equipment. But wait, it's not just any lithium-ion battery, it's LG's state-of-the-art lithium-ion-polymer battery. But wait, the Ioniq battery has twice (twice!) the energy density of the Prius' crap batteries.

The Ioniq has a 6-speed DCT. The Prius has the droning eCVT. +1 for the Ioniq.

The gen IV Prius has improved EPA gas mileage. The Ioniq will equal or better that mileage on the road. But wait, the Ioniq also has ECO-DAS technology which will further improve real-life gas mileage. Advantage Ioniq again.

The gen IV Prius retains the heavy 12-v pb-acid battery. The Ioniq gets rid of it and derives the 12-v from the traction battery; saving 26 lbs and saving the owner from replacing the expensive battery every 4 or 5 years.

I could go on and on. This is before we even talk about styling and all the features that the Ioniq will have standard that Toyota will gouge their customers for. So again, I have to ask how is the Ioniq not competitive with the gen IV Prius? To my way of thinking it completely slams the gen IV Prius.

I can't wait till the car magazines and bloggers do comparison tests. The Ioniq is going to smash the Prius in nearly every category, but especially in the categories that really matter: fuel economy, comfort, handling, styling, and overall value.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Jay - Your points are all well made, and I accept them without debate. But we haven't seen or been able to test one yet. I completely agree, and anxious await test comparisons. Personally, as for the CVT compared to the Ioniq 6 speed .... I have no idea until I drive the two. Remaining questions in my mind are reliability, fit and finish,handling, interior quietness, and rear seat head room (we have read that it is short).

But I do like the looks of the Ioniq over the Prius.
 

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In what way is the Ioniq not competitive with the gen IV Prius?

snip...


The gen IV Prius now offers a lithium-ion battery as an extra-cost option over their completely obsolete NiMH which is standard. The Ioniq has a lithium-ion battery as standard equipment. But wait, it's not just any lithium-ion battery, it's LG's state-of-the-art lithium-ion-polymer battery. But wait, the Ioniq battery has twice (twice!) the energy density of the Prius' crap batteries.


snip,,.

in UK prius 4 has no option for Li Po batteries, the online configurator and brouchure don't show that option, where you seeing the option
 

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I don't think Stirfelt meant that the Ioniq isn't competitive, just that Toyota shot itself in the foot when it came to the Prius even if you don't compare it to our models like the Ioniq. All the points listed have merit and it'll be interesting to see a comparison from journalists.
 

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Toyota's Prius plug in sales are probably going to dip once the Ioniq comes out. I took at look at their plug in sales for this year so far in NA and they only sold 31.
 

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in UK prius 4 has no option for Li Po batteries, the online configurator and brouchure don't show that option, where you seeing the option
No Prius that I know of offers lithium-ion polymer batteries. In the US, the base model (Prius 2) still has the Ni-MH battery standard with no option to upgrade. The higher level trims ditch the Ni-MH and go to lithium-ion. Regardless the battery type, the Ioniq has twice the battery capacity of the gen IV Prius.
 

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In what way is the Ioniq not competitive with the gen IV Prius?
The gen IV Prius now offers a lithium-ion battery as an extra-cost option over their completely obsolete NiMH which is standard.
I wouldn't call it an extra cost option as you can't get opt for it in a trim that doesn't offer it. For example, a Prius two has NiMH battery but you can't add a Li-Ion to a two. Besides, NiMH has been working for over a decade. It's not like all of the sudden it doesn't work anymore now that Li-Ion is here.

The Ioniq has a lithium-ion battery as standard equipment. But wait, it's not just any lithium-ion battery, it's LG's state-of-the-art lithium-ion-polymer battery. But wait, the Ioniq battery has twice (twice!) the energy density of the Prius' crap batteries.
Also keep in mind that Li-Po is far more dangerous than standard Li-Ion. Any mismanagement on the battery could result in thermal run away.

The Ioniq has a 6-speed DCT. The Prius has the droning eCVT. +1 for the Ioniq.
eCVT is what kept the city mileage higher than highway mileage. eCVT has been tried and true at getting the most mileage in city driving. Toyota has been doing it for over a decade.
Double clutch has its own problems http://www.autonews.com/article/20151207/OEM06/312079988/once-promising-dual-clutch-transmissions-lose-favor-in-u.s.

The gen IV Prius has improved EPA gas mileage. The Ioniq will equal or better that mileage on the road. But wait, the Ioniq also has ECO-DAS technology which will further improve real-life gas mileage. Advantage Ioniq again.
Toyota has under estimated the Prius's fuel economy. Many Prius owners are reporting 60's, 70's and even 80's mpg. That's not just for the trip but for the whole tank. The Prius can easily do 700 mile tank. Some have done 800+ mile tank. One even did 1000 mile tank. I have done several 700+ mile tank on my 2010 Gen 3 Prius with 17" rims.
Hyundai has a history of over estimating the fuel economy on their cars. We'll see how the Ioniq will do.


The gen IV Prius retains the heavy 12-v pb-acid battery. The Ioniq gets rid of it and derives the 12-v from the traction battery; saving 26 lbs and saving the owner from replacing the expensive battery every 4 or 5 years.
That is an advantage for the Ioniq if it's done right. However, will the Ioniq save itself from draining the HV battery to death if ACC or IGN-ON is accidentally left on over night? Does this also mean that Ioniq can't give other people a jump? Prius is capable of jumping other cars if done right. Also for the Prius, since there's no starter to crank, you can jump start a dead Prius with a 12V drill gun battery.


I could go on and on. This is before we even talk about styling and all the features that the Ioniq will have standard that Toyota will gouge their customers for. So again, I have to ask how is the Ioniq not competitive with the gen IV Prius? To my way of thinking it completely slams the gen IV Prius.
On paper, the Ioniq is very competitive with the new Prius. However, there are many tried and failed so call Prius killers. I really hope the Ioniq is not one of them. If the Ioniq can deliver what's on paper, I might ditch my Prius for one.

I can't wait till the car magazines and bloggers do comparison tests. The Ioniq is going to smash the Prius in nearly every category, but especially in the categories that really matter: fuel economy, comfort, handling, styling, and overall value.
I'm just here trying to learn as much information as I can about the Ioniq before replacing my 2010.
 

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Hyundai could always install fail safes to take care of potential power loss and things you would typically use a fail safe or something that serves the same purpose. I wouldn't be too concerned about it but it will really come down to seeing how it will do in the hands of owners for at least 6 months.

I suggest you hold on to your car for at least a year more.
 

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Cproaudio, I'm not going to spend much time rebutting your battery points because it's hard to get specs on specific batteries. There are many types of Li-ion and li-ion polymer chemistries and even LG custom formulates Li-ion polymer battery chemistries for clients. Here's a partial list of who's using LG Li-ion polymer batteries:

GM
Hyundai-Kia
Ford
Volvo Renault
Southern California Edison
Eaton

LG Chem Power (LGCPI) Milestones - LG Chem Power (LGCPI)

Here's a list of auto manufacturers that still use Ni-MH batteries:

Toyota

And even Toyota won't/can't use them in their PHEVs. I won't belabor the point because even Toyota is moving away from Ni-MH in their HEVs.

Regarding DCTs: it's pretty well known that the weak point of DCTs is getting the vehicle moving from a complete stop. Very low speed operation is also jerky. The control systems have difficulty controlling clutch action when slipping is required. This is a complete non-problem with Hyundai's hybrid drivetrain because a smooth, torquey electric motor always gets the vehicle underway. It's completely inappropriate to attribute DCT weaknesses to a hybrid vehicle where an electric motor is effectively first gear and acts as a torque converter.

Regarding FE: We'll have to see. EPA tests won't show the Hyundai in it's best light because of its ECO-DAS technology. Real world driving tests are what matters and both cars will be excellent in that respect. No doubt Wayne Gerdes at CleanMPG will run extensive real world comparative tests because of all the interest.

Regarding the elimination of the 12v pb-acid battery: No. You almost certainly won't be giving conventional cars jump starts with Hyundai-Kia's 12-v electronic power supply vs a heavy pb-acid battery. Maybe a jump start to a Prius. :) On the other hand, you won't be needing jump starts which is more important to me.
 

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I think the prius has a problem


£19,995 for the Ioniq SE
£21,795 for the Ioniq Premium


prius 4 starts at £23,295


that is a good price, and well undercuts the prius 4 price, tech in car is good as well


disappointed LED headlights only on the electric version and bi-xenon only on premium models
 

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...disappointed LED headlights only on the electric version and bi-xenon only on premium models
This is an area where Toyota is clearly superior, not only to Hyundai, but to most other makes as well. Even Toyota's base trim Corolla gets LED headlights. LEDs are much more efficient than xenon and take no time to warm up. Xenons take at least 5 minutes to warm to full output.
 

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I've been enjoying LED headlights since 2010. It is amazing. It lights up the road so much brighter than HIDs and the highway reflectors shows farther than HIDs. The corolla's LED is a single emitter. It's probably a higher wattage emitter compare to my 2010 Prius which has 3 emitters.
A lot of Prius owners have sat in the Ioniq and they all seem to think that it's smaller than the Prius. They say it's about the size of a Volt. I hope this is not true.
Does anyone know if the Ioniq is beltless? I would hate to replace belts as part of the maintenance. Also beltless allows the AC to work when the engine is off. Insight has a big problem with this during summer.
Back to the DCT, has anyone driven the Ioniq? How does the shift feel? I'm spoiled by the CVT. I really hate the feeling of noticeable shifts. I had a 92 Accord automatic and that thing shifts like a manual trans. Every gear pulls. My Tacoma and Sienna all feel silky smooth with absolutely no feeling of noticeable shifts. I really hope the Ioniq is like that.
I have a couple of questions regarding the radar cruise control and the precollision system. Does the radar cruise control work all the way down to complete stop? If not how slow does it go before cutting out? My 2010 works down to 23mph then cuts out and the new 2016 works all the way down to stop like the Tesla Autopilot. Does the PCS system stop the car completely before collision like the Subaru Eyesight?
 
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