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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
There are plenty of information on the internet about carbon build up on intake valve on GDI engine and one of the ways to reduce the build up is to install a catch can between PCV and intake manifold.

Thought I share some pictures of the oil catch can installed on my Ioniq Hybrid to give some idea to those who are interested to install one on their Ioniq HEV or PHEV.

Things I bought for installation of the catch can :
Mishimoto Compact Baffled Oil Catch Can, 2-Port, some 3/8 fuel line, 2 brass 3/8" barbed adapter, 1 brass 3/8" barbed splicer, 4mm thick aluminum plate measuring about 100x26mm in size, some screw, nuts and washers for mounting.

Included in the attached pictures is drawing of the aluminum mount I made for my friend who helped cut, bend and drill the mount.
 

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lokks like a good mod! but how is your warranty affected? hyundai could say engine warrant affected as oil mist/vapour should be burnt off and is an upper cylinder lubricant!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
lokks like a good mod! but how is your warranty affected? hyundai could say engine warrant affected as oil mist/vapour should be burnt off and is an upper cylinder lubricant!

The only reason oil mist/vapor is send back into the combustion chamber is so that its burned off as exhaust gas which is better for environment than venting it to atmosphere (cars manufactured prior to 1960s does that). Feeding those oil back to the intake manifold would actually cause more problem in long run especially knowing that with direct injection engine, there is no fuel sprayed (acting as cleaning agent) on the intake valve and without anything to clean the valve those oil from PCV caught on the intake valve would turn to gunk and build up over time.


I have yet to send my car for servicing since I installed the catch can. The way I have the catch can is installed is easily reversible if I'm worry about warranty. I did however came across experience shared by others on another forum (hyundai volester) with catch can installed and have their car serviced at hyundai without any problem, but I guess its subjective to the person working on your car at the service center.
 

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The only reason oil mist/vapor is send back into the combustion chamber is so that its burned off as exhaust gas which is better for environment than venting it to atmosphere (cars manufactured prior to 1960s does that). Feeding those oil back to the intake manifold would actually cause more problem in long run especially knowing that with direct injection engine, there is no fuel sprayed (acting as cleaning agent) on the intake valve and without anything to clean the valve those oil from PCV caught on the intake valve would turn to gunk and build up over time.


I have yet to send my car for servicing since I installed the catch can. The way I have the catch can is installed is easily reversible if I'm worry about warranty. I did however came across experience shared by others on another forum (hyundai volester) with catch can installed and have their car serviced at hyundai without any problem, but I guess its subjective to the person working on your car at the service center.
The real reason for the PCV system is to Ventilate the crankcase. Blowby gasses are exhaust gasses that make it past the piston rings and that happens on every engine cycle from every piston. These gases contain Hydrocarbons, CO, and NOx along with mostly water vapor and CO2. Everything except the CO2 tends to accelerate the deterioration rate of the oil in the crankcase. A properly design PCV system constantly purges the crankcase with fresh air that is metered by the PCV valve, and is driven by the vacuum in the intake manifold. The engine is designed with oil mist separators in the path to the PCV valve, but these are not completely effective, so a small percentage of the oil droplets in the PCV flow path make it past the built-in oil droplet separator. The aftermarket catch can captures the rest of them. The effectiveness of the catch can will be highly deoendent on how well the factory system is designed and how hard the engine is run.

Dave
 

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For competition use a catch tank is compulsory, but its main purpose is in case of catastrophic piston or ring failure, to catch the oil rather than letting it get onto the track.The tank volume must exceed the capacity of one cylinder.
 

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I swear you need 2 catch cans 1 for PCV and other for line behind motor as it goes to throttle body.


I put mine in different location with a bracket I made.
Technically that is correct. The PCV system has 2 lines. 1 between the engine and the intake manifold whcih includes the PCV valve. This is the line that flows most of the crankcase fumes because it operates when the engine is at low to medium power. Flow is from the engine t other intake manifold through the PCV valve. During this operation the breather line (from the air cleaner) flows fresh air in from the aircleaner to ventilate the crankcase with air. At higher loads, the intake manifold vacuum goes to near zero and the blowby gas flow rate (past each piston) goes up, and so the crankcase fumes flow out the breather tube to the aircleaner. If you hardly ever run at high power levels you won't catch any oil in the breather line.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I swear you need 2 catch cans 1 for PCV and other for line behind motor as it goes to throttle body.


I put mine in different location with a bracket I made.
I have yet to ran my car on full throttle. The following pdf talks about different setup and in what situation another catch can on the breather will be beneficial from keeping oil and vapor recirculating back to your engine intake. I came across this when I was researching for catch can for my ioniq hybrid.

https://www.shophemi.com/images/media/p-2591-p-2273-arrington_ccv_bible.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I swear you need 2 catch cans 1 for PCV and other for line behind motor as it goes to throttle body.


I put mine in different location with a bracket I made.
Also, I like how short your hose route from PCV to catch can then to the intake. I was wondering if I should mount it at where you're mounting your catch can to shorten the route from PCV back to intake, if that will actually improve anything?
 

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If anyone doubts that we need at least one oil catch can then this will give you a fair view on GDI engines and where the gunk goes...

Also starring the hyundai GDI engine....
 

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I don't have 20 mins to watch a video and I don't know what this relates to...
Maybe a short post would be better ?
Maybe... ;) modern life, who'd have one...

At the risk of repeating all the info from the rest of the thread... and placing "plenty of info about the issue on Google" on here.

Direct injection engines fire fuel direct into the cylinder NOT INTO THE INLET MANIFOLD, so any oil that gets evaporated along with blow by fuel and travels from the crankcase through the emmisions pipework back to the air intake. Any of this vapour that does not get burnt at ignition ends up in the air intake system as an oily crud in the inlet manifold and on the back of the inlet valves, valve seats and valve stems.

Additives in fuel will not clean this crud but will help the expensive injectors.

A well fitted sealed catch can with baffles will help remove 95% of the crud that gets sent to the air intake. The pipework works under vacuum conditions and will upset the engine, if the catch can does not keep this vacuum in place.

Getting a garage to blast some ground nut shell's through the intake area with the valves shut every 30k miles also helps clear the crud.

You can also spray a cleaning additive into the air intake after the MAF sensor... to soften and remove the carbon build up... And driving like you stole it... Or was that another video...

The hyundai GDI engine features at 4 mins 40 secs but Direct injection features in first 2 mins before the alternatives...

"So you don't have to"
 

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Migration to DI on new cars was the primary reason I paused buying new ICE cars and just kept driving my older port injection ones(thankfully with a lot of life left in those) and moved on to EV. If I Would own the car with DI engine, I would put oil catch without much of hesitation, as I keep my cars for very long time. Not doing it - would be very pricey, because of it would happen right after warranty expires. I am not compelled to buy any used car with DI engine, because of it would have contaminated intake already. Really sad situation.
 

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I have yet to ran my car on full throttle. The following pdf talks about different setup and in what situation another catch can on the breather will be beneficial from keeping oil and vapor recirculating back to your engine intake. I came across this when I was researching for catch can for my ioniq hybrid.

https://www.shophemi.com/images/media/p-2591-p-2273-arrington_ccv_bible.pdf
I ran my Hybrid at full throttle on many occasions and covered 60,000 miles with no failures, warning lights, compression issues, or starting smoke.
Nor did it consume any oil between services, and it didnt drop any on the drive either...

Are you actually in possession of any evidence that this alleged thing is a problem? I think it's a fuss over nothing, total bollox and just an excuse to fubar a perfectly serviceable car.
Try reading less, trusting things you read on the interweb with a healthy dose of scepticism, and driving more...

Blow-by is typically an issue on high-mileage vehicles treated badly by their owners. It DOES NOT exist on modern vehicles that meet the latest emission regulations, and don't piss oil down your driveway.
And if it's doing either of these things it's straight back to the dealer for warranty rectification, not some ersatz tinpan solution under the hood! >:)
 

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@SEvans I'm inclined to agree with your assessment.

To all those people who think installing catch cans is a great idea on new GDI engines, under the misconception that because fuel isn't injected into the intake port, somehow causes problems with intake valves to gum up, how about diesel engines? Diesel engines have never had fuel injected into the intake system (apart from poorly designed pre heating systems of years gone by) and some of these engines can reach in excess of 1,000,000 miles without problems. The main scurge of modern diesel engine problems is EGR. As diesel is more oily than petrol consequently the exhaust gasses are more oily. That's what causes the EGR problems.

Because the Ioniq doesn't have a turbocharger, the oil in the intake system is vastly reduced, and if good quality oil is used in the crankcase there is absolutely no need for a catch can.
 
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